A Technocentric Metropolis

Last May students of the dual degree programme between Sciences Po and the University of British Columbia landed in Chongqing, China to participate in the first edition of the UBC - SWUPL (Southwest University of Political Science and Law) Global Seminar. Zachary Pascaud shared his account of this futuristic month-long experience.

The fact that most people in the West have never heard of the Chinese city of Chongqing, which on a technicality holds the title of the most populous city in the world, speaks volumes about our understanding of the Asian superpower. After three days in smoggy Beijing, I landed in the massive, futuristic Chongqing Jiangbei International Airport, where I was greeted by two extremely kind (and just a little bit intimidated) students who insisted on carrying my bags although they were about half my size. One of them, who went by the English name Theresa, had been assigned as my ‘buddy’ for the trip and would routinely take me out for meals and check in on me throughout the trip. Each of the 20 UBC students received a similarly warm and attentive greeting from the SWUPL students in our programme, and most of us had never been exposed to such hospitality - least of all in a university setting.

Our schedules in Chongqing were absolutely packed. On weekdays, we would wake up at 8, have breakfast, and head towards our assigned classroom for a 9am lecture. Each lecture was delivered by a different SWUPL professor (except those delivered by Yves Tiberghien, the programme’s organiser on the UBC side and a Sciences Po alumnus) on topics ranging from Urban Planning in Chongqing to Chinese environmental protection policy. The classroom was filled with equal parts UBC and SWUPL students, and students from both schools were strongly encouraged to participate. Prior to our departure, we had been warned of a line in the sand regarding what could and could not be discussed in class regarding certain political and historical topics. To be clear - that line did exist, but to our surprise, the SWUPL students generally seemed more willing to cross it than we were (likely because they had a better understanding of exactly which topics were off-limits).

After lunch, we would board a bus for our daily afternoon excursion. We were able to visit such diverse places as an Intellectual Property courtroom in session, an electric vehicle manufacturing plant, an ancient rock carving and an Anti-Japanese War Site Museum. A personal favourite was our outing to Chengdu, a city most famous for its panda reserve, where we spent a very heartwarming day.

Chongqing is a unique administrative division

When I say that Chongqing is only technically the world’s biggest city, it’s because Chongqing isn’t really a city. The Chongqing metropolitan area, with its area of 82,000 km2, is roughly the size of Austria. The urban area of Chongqing (known as central Chongqing) hosts about 9 million people but represents only a fraction of the municipality. There is a good reason behind Chongqing’s special administrative status - it is one of four municipalities under the direct control of the central government, and the only one away from the coast. The municipality was placed under direct government control in 1997 as part of an effort to develop the country’s SouthWest region, which for a long time has lagged behind the East. Now a major manufacturing center and transportation hub, Chongqing is a testament of the success of China’s decentralization policy.

Technology is omnipresent

Chinese cities such as Chongqing are virtually cash free. Those that have visited China within the past several years are well aware of this but for newcomers it remains a shock to see an elderly woman paying a street vendor for her meal by scanning a QR code with her phone. In fact, most of the students I spoke to hadn’t used cash in years and didn’t even carry a wallet. Most of China’s digitally literate population depends on platforms such as WeChat, a sort of mega-app with almost 1 billion monthly users which is probably best described as a combination of facebook, venmo, whatsapp and instagram. Technological progress has already disrupted the Chinese workforce - many restaurants and coffee shops have entirely replaced waiters and cashiers with digital kiosks. Unemployment, however, remains low: the Chinese government expends significant resources in its Public Employment Service System and has made curbing the impact of technological unemployment a priority.

The various ways in which technology is used in Chongqing go from the very practical to the extravagant. Every evening a dozen of massive buildings on the bank of the Yangtze river in Chongqing’s massive downtown area would light up as one, forming an animated canvas on which a handful of exotic fish could be seen swimming around. At times things verged on the bizarre: like when we were escorted into a private karaoke room by a very slow, human sized robot on wheels.

There are a million more things that I could add, but in the interest of brevity I’ll finish by thanking UBC, SWUPL and Sciences Po, three schools without which this incredible experience would never have been possible.

Zachary Pascaud graduated from the University of British Columbia in the dual degree programme with Sciences Po in June 2018.

More information

Qui est Roland Marchal, incarcéré en Iran depuis juin 2019 ?

Qui est Roland Marchal, incarcéré en Iran depuis juin 2019 ?

Par Sandrine Perrot et Didier Péclard - Roland Marchal, incarcéré en Iran depuis juin 2019, est sociologue, chercheur CNRS au Centre de recherches internationales (CERI) de Sciences Po depuis 1997. Il a consacré l’essentiel de son œuvre à l’analyse des guerres civiles en Afrique subsaharienne, notamment dans leur rapport à la formation des États. Homme de terrain, chercheur infatigable, méticuleux et exigeant, Roland Marchal est l’un des plus fins connaisseurs de la Somalie, mais son expertise s’étend à toute la Corne de l’Afrique, au Tchad, à la République centrafricaine et au Mali.

Lire la suite
Soutien à Fariba Adelkhah et Roland Marchal

Soutien à Fariba Adelkhah et Roland Marchal

Jeudi 17 octobre 2019. 

La détention en Iran de notre collègue Roland Marchal, directeur de recherche CNRS au CERI, vient d'être rendue publique. Pour des raisons de sécurité, les autorités françaises n'avaient pas encore révélé la nouvelle de son arrestation et nous avaient demandé de respecter cette consigne de discrétion.

Lire la suite
Qui est Fariba Adelkhah, incarcérée en Iran depuis juin 2019 ?

Qui est Fariba Adelkhah, incarcérée en Iran depuis juin 2019 ?

Par Jean-François Bayart - Incarcérée depuis le début du mois de juin en Iran, Fariba Adelkhah, spécialiste de l’anthropologie sociale et de l’anthropologie politique de l’Iran postrévolutionnaire, est chercheuse au Centre de recherches internationales de Sciences Po (CERI) depuis 1993. Ses travaux initiaux portaient sur les femmes et la Révolution islamique. Ses recherches actuelles portent sur la circulation des clercs chiites entre l’Afghanistan, l’Iran et l’Irak. Portrait scientifique de cette chercheuse de terrain, reconnue internationalement et respectée par ses pairs, aujourd'hui prisonnière scientifique.

Lire la suite
“Venir d’un lycée de zone rurale et faire Sciences Po

“Venir d’un lycée de zone rurale et faire Sciences Po"

A l’origine association dédiée uniquement aux jeunes basques, “Des territoires aux grandes écoles” est aujourd’hui une fédération établie à l’échelle de toute la France. Son objectif ? Encourager les lycéens des zones rurales à oser candidater dans l’enseignement supérieur. Interview avec Mandine Pichon Paulard, étudiante et présidente de l’antenne Sciences Po de l’association. 

Lire la suite
16 nouveaux chercheurs à Sciences Po

16 nouveaux chercheurs à Sciences Po

16 académiques permanents ont rejoint Sciences Po en cette rentrée 2019. Une grande diversité les caractérise, qu'il s'agisse de leurs universités d'origine, de leurs parcours, de leurs disciplines ou encore de leurs spécialités.

Lire la suite
Erasmus : Vivre L’Europe

Erasmus : Vivre L’Europe

Sur l'année universitaire 2018-2019, plus de 500 étudiants de Sciences Po ont participé à un programme Erasmus+, et 650 ont été reçus à Sciences Po : comme chaque année, Sciences Po participe activement au programme Erasmus ! Notre université n’est pas seulement membre active de ce programme, elle est aussi impliquée dans de nombreuses initiatives visant à construire une Europe plus forte et plus unifiée dans les domaines de l'éducation et de la mobilité. 

Lire la suite
Qu'apprend-on au Collège universitaire ?

Qu'apprend-on au Collège universitaire ?

La pluridisciplinarité. La troisième année à l’étranger. L’histoire. La science politique. Étudier à Paris. Ne pas étudier à Paris. Chaque étudiant a sa raison bien à lui de choisir le bachelor de Sciences Po. Mais de quelles sciences humaines et sociales parle-t-on ? À quoi cela peut-il bien servir plus tard ? Entretien avec la doyenne du Collège universitaire, Stéphanie Balme, sur cette formation “iconique” du parcours à Sciences Po.

Lire la suite
De Sciences Po au Parlement européen

De Sciences Po au Parlement européen

Diplômée de Sciences Po en 2012, Charlotte Nørlund-Matthiessen a effectué son premier cycle sur le campus de Dijon en choisissant le programme européen - Europe centrale et orientale, un cursus de Sciences Po spécialisé dans l’approfondissement des enjeux européens. Puis, pour son second cycle, elle a rejoint le master Affaires européennes. Aujourd’hui assistante parlementaire, elle travaille aux côtés d’un député français au Parlement européen. En quoi consiste le travail d’un assistant parlementaire ? Comment ses études à Sciences Po l’ont-elles aidé dans sa carrière ? Témoignage.

Lire la suite