Campus In Progress

At the start of the 2020-21 academic year, Sciences Po will open its new Parisian address, an expansion to its current campus in Saint-Germain-des-Prés, located at 1, place Saint-Thomas d’Aquin. The former site of the Hôtel de l’Artillerie will have completed its transformation into the future Parisian campus by then, but for the moment, it is a vast playground for excavators, shovels and construction workers. Our photographer, Martin Argyroglo, had the chance to roam the construction site and capture the work in progress.

The first machines and workers arrived on the site at the end of 2018. This first phase of preparatory work involved exposing the buildings’ true colours, and in the months that followed the cleaning process revealed the extent of fatigue they had suffered from several generations’ worth of occupants.

Reportage photos sur les travaux du 1 Saint-Thomas

The Sebastopol courtyard, for instance, had at one time ceased to be a place of wandering: the former novitiate passed into the hands of military authorities at the end of the 18th century. After the First World War, the administration was anxious to optimise the available space and thus multiplied the number of offices located in these stone alleys, which retain traces of these renovations even today.

Reportage photos sur les travaux du 1 Saint-Thomas

The Treuille de Beaulieu courtyard has been cleared out. It is destined to be excavated so as to accommodate the Sciences Po Journalism School and an adjoining garden.

Reportage photos sur les travaux du 1 Saint-Thomas

Inside the buildings that surround the Gribeauval courtyard, lining elements and plasterboard cladding have been removed. The structure appears naked, allowing us to observe traces of work conducted nearly a decade ago. The interiors have been redesigned to allow for the addition of a first floor.

Reportage photos sur les travaux du 1 Saint-Thomas

In March 2019, under the first rays of the spring sun, the great metal jaws of the excavator swallowed whole, section-by-section, the large building that sat in the middle of the Gribeauval courtyard, leaving room for a courtyard lined with trees.

Reportage photos sur les travaux du 1 Saint-Thomas

In the Gribeauval courtyard, all that falls to the ground is not simply whisked away without a second thought; the objective of a “green construction” such as that of 1, place Saint-Thomas d’Aquin implies a deep commitment to being ecologically responsible. Waste materials are not disposed en masse, but rather they are inspected and sorted towards their respective recycling methods. Each one will be granted a new life: metal will be recycled, while concrete will be pulverized for reuse.

Reportage photos sur les travaux du 1 Saint-Thomas

This July, from the place Saint-Thomas d’Aquin, the construction crane was mounted onto the site and the foundation stone was inlaid: the construction phase could now begin.

A detailed narration of the progress and more photos of the construction work can be found below:
The site in pictures: episode 1, the work begins
The site in pictures: episode 2, demolition (FR)
The site in pictures: episode 3, a gigantic crane (FR)

For all the latest news about the upcoming campus extension, visit the blog of the project, Campus 2022.

Photo credits: Martin Argyroglo

Support Us

Where are our graduates now?

Where are our graduates now?

The 2020 Graduate Employability Survey asked the Class of 2018 what they were up to now. Their responses reaffirm Sciences Po graduates’ attractivity on the job market, with 9 out of 10 graduates currently working. Amongst them, 86% landed a job less than 6 months after graduating, and ¾ of them in a permanent contract. More and more graduates work abroad (37%), and more and more report being satisfied with their jobs! Discover the full results of our survey below.

More
LSE becomes the eighth full member of CIVICA

LSE becomes the eighth full member of CIVICA

On 16 June 2020, the European Commission updated the status of The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) from “associated partner” to “full member” of CIVICA - The European University of Social Sciences, following a request submitted by the alliance.

More
Key takeaways from a semester unlike any other

Key takeaways from a semester unlike any other

The 2019/2020 academic year has come to an end, and our students have experienced a semester unlike any other. What takeaways can we draw from this unprecedented period? How did this hurried switchover go over for students and teachers? The verdict that we are able to draw today shows a successful adjustment for the vast majority and provides useful lessons for the upcoming semester.

More
Prof. Anne Cullerre: “Ruling the seas”

Prof. Anne Cullerre: “Ruling the seas”

Students both with and without previous military experience are able to enrol in Vice-Admiral Anne Cullerre’s course, “Ruling the seas”, provided that they have an interest in the “untamable realm” that is the ocean, with all of its geopolitical rivalries, territorial disputes, environmental challenges...and pirates. While “a smooth sea never made a skilled sailor”, a skilled sailor certainly makes a great teacher!

More
A Deep Dive Into the Heart of the Startup Nation

A Deep Dive Into the Heart of the Startup Nation

After a trip to Silicon Valley in 2017 and to the MIT in 2019, the Centre for Entrepreneurship’s third Learning Expedition took participants to Israel, a country equivalent in size to a French département that has the highest number of startups per capita in the world (1 in 6,000). What are the reasons for this “entrepreneurial miracle”, and how does it work? Loanne Guérin and Laura Salesse (first and second year students respectively in the Master’s in Finance and Strategy), two of the twelve students chosen to take part in the adventure, tell us about their experience.

More
Mobility as a Catalyst for Resilience and Renewal

Mobility as a Catalyst for Resilience and Renewal

International academic mobility has been a cornerstone of universities dating back as far as the 12th and 13th centuries when they began to flower throughout the European continent.  With a clear understanding of the multiple benefits of academic mobility and the rich and diverse learning environment it created, the University of Bologna, the oldest university in Europe, adopted the Constitutio Habita, an academic charter that ensured and protected the rights and free movement of a traveling scholar in the pursuit of education.  The widely referred to concept of “academic freedom” today stems from the idea of this charter.

More
Basic Relationships Between Epidemic, Economy, and Inequalities

Basic Relationships Between Epidemic, Economy, and Inequalities

The public debate on the current economic crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic has focused on rich countries. But how is this crisis truly “global”? What are the current inequalities with developing countries? Here is an overview with Jérôme Sgard, Professor of Political Economy at the Centre for International Studies (CERI) at Sciences Po and specialist in the construction and regulation of markets.

More
Study Abroad in Buenos Aires: Flora’s Urban Dream

Study Abroad in Buenos Aires: Flora’s Urban Dream

At Sciences Po, all third-year undergraduate students spend a mandatory year abroad studying at one of our 478 partner universities or pursuing an internship. After two years on our Paris campus, Flora Cerda chose to spend her third year at the Universidad Católica Argentina in Buenos Aires. In this video, she tells us about her experience and how it helped reinforce her passion and interests, and better define her choice of Master’s and future career goals.

More