2018 Admissions: More Applicants, Greater Selectivity

In 2018, for the first time, the number of candidates applying to Sciences Po exceeded the 20,000 mark. Up by 16%, the number of applications shows Sciences Po has an unprecedented appeal, in particular for Master’s programmes where reforms made to the French entry procedures have caused a spike in additional applications. Since 2009, the number of international applications has tripled. This year, the top 10 countries of origin of our admitted candidates via the international procedure, are: the United States, Germany, Italy, India, China, Canada, Great Britain, Brazil, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Undergraduate College: Higher Selectivity

This past year, we observed an 8% increase in undergraduate applications from 2017, which has led to a competitive acceptance rate of 17%, compared to 19% in 2017. 46% of admitted candidates to the undergraduate college applied through the international procedure.

The 2018 intake of first-year students came from 93 different countries: European students make up 16% of those admitted, followed by students from Asia (9.3%), and the Americas (6%). 64% of the intake were French students, coming from 1,585 different high schools, and the majority come from regions outside of the capital, (61% of successful French applicants come from different regions or overseas). 

This overview testifies Sciences Po’s continued efforts to encourage social diversity, with more than 1,900 students admitted since 2001 via our Equal Opportunity Programme. On a wider scale, 26% of students have received scholarships, illustrating the efficacy of our unique social assistance and tuition fee policy. In 2017-2018, one in three students did not pay any tuition fees, and 37% of them received financial aid.

Master’s Students: Applicants From Across the Globe

Master’s applications peaked with a 30% increase compared with 2017. As the number of applications increased, so has selectivity: out of 8,915 applications, 2,108 were offered places. The acceptance rate is now 24%, comparative to 30% in 2017.

Another trend is the increase in the number of international applicants, with dual degrees gaining in popularity, producing a 16% rise since 2017. In 2018, Sciences Po received international applications coming from 124 different countries. 

In general, after several years without change, the admissions reforms adopted in 2017 resulted in a 53% increase in applications throughout the French system. In turn, more applicants have tried their hand at applying to Sciences Po following the removal of the written exam and the introduction of a dual evaluation by means of a dossier.

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Tēnaka: A Sciences Po start-up wins the Columbia Alliance Social Enterprise Challenge

Tēnaka: A Sciences Po start-up wins the Columbia Alliance Social Enterprise Challenge

Tēnaka, a social business founded by Anne-Sophie Roux, recent graduate of the Sciences Po School of Research and supported by the Centre for Entrepreneurship, is the winner of the 2021 Alliance Social Enterprise Challenge! This social entrepreneurship competition organized by the Columbia Alliance awards a prize of U$25,000 to support the development of a social venture project.

According to a NASA study, 27% of the world’s coral reefs have disappeared in the last 50 years, and 32% are threatened with extinction.. Yet corals are the lungs of our planet, guarantors of the balance of the Earth's ecosystem and the survival of 60 million people around the globeTēnaka is the first social enterprise that rebuilds these key ecosystems alongside corporations, scientists and local NGOs and communities. And while Tēnaka targets corporations, the programme My Coral Garden allows individuals to plant their own coral.

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CIVICA Scholars Discuss: How Have Growth Regimes Evolved?

CIVICA Scholars Discuss: How Have Growth Regimes Evolved?

How have advanced capitalist economies and their welfare systems evolved since the early 1990s? To answer this question, Bruno Palier, CNRS Research Director at Sciences Po’s Centre for European Studies, and Anke Hassel, Professor of Public Policy at the Hertie School, co-wrote the book Growth and Welfare in Advanced Capitalist Economies: How Have Growth Regimes Evolved?, recently published by Oxford University Press. The volume was discussed by distinguished scholars from CIVICA universities in a webinar on 29 March 2021. We asked the authors a few questions.

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French Graduate Admissions: Tips for the Interview

French Graduate Admissions: Tips for the Interview

You applied for a Master’s programme at Sciences Po via the French procedure* and have been pre-selected? Congratulations! Next step: the interview. This final stage of the admissions procedure will take place remotely between 19 April and 30 April 2021 (from 13 April for the Journalism School only). For many students, the interview can be the most stressful element of their application: what kind of profile are we looking for, how can you demonstrate your motivation, how best defend your ideas? Preparation is key! We've laid out some simple guidelines to help get you succeed in this final stretch.

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Food (In)Security and Waste: Lessons from the Pandemic

Food (In)Security and Waste: Lessons from the Pandemic

By Marie Mourad (Center for the Sociology of Organizations)

Since March 2020, the coronavirus pandemic has caused severe economic downturn and generated a spike in food insecurity in the country. At the same time, farmers had to destroy significant quantities of food because they could not find markets for their products. The crisis has revealed weaknesses and contradictions in our food system – but also opens up opportunities for reform.

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David Camroux: “The Myanmar military junta has fallen for its own propaganda”

David Camroux: “The Myanmar military junta has fallen for its own propaganda”

On 1 February 2021, just minutes before the swearing-in of newly elected members of parliament, Myanmar’s military junta seized power in a coup. The country erupted in a wave of protests that has mutated into multiple forms and, in particular, a mounting movement of civil disobedience. What is at stake in this politically volatile country, where post-colonial tensions were never resolved? We spoke to David Camroux, a senior researcher at the Centre for International Studies (CERI) and a specialist in Southeast Asian affairs.

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Enrico Letta: "Sciences Po was one of the smartest choices in my life"

As politics calls him back to lead the Italian Democratic Party, Enrico Letta is leaving Sciences Po and his position as Dean of the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA), which he directed for six years. A final interview to celebrate his exceptional track record, and tell him ... arrivederci!

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"Across the Blocks": A Learning Expedition Into Smart Cities

In January 2020, recent graduates Benoît Gufflet and Dimitri Kremp set off on a learning expedition to explore seven “smart cities”. They published their report, "Learning Cities", on 22 March, 2021: an immersive and interactive account exploring and deconstructing the fantasies of the Smart City. We spoke to them in October 2020 about their journey, what they’ve learned about “smart cities,” urban dwellers and pursuing a learning expedition during a global health crisis.

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