Home>The Journey Of Three Sciences Po’s Students At The COP 27 In Egypt

24.11.2022

The Journey Of Three Sciences Po’s Students At The COP 27 In Egypt

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GAUC students day at the COP 27. (credits: DR)

Sciences Po is a leading social sciences international university, as such, the school sent a delegation of nine persons to the Conference of the Parties of the UNFCC 27 (COP 27) that took place at Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt from 6 to 18 November 2022. Some researchers, as Carola Kloeck or Charlotte Halpern, were part of the delegation but also students, as youth ambassadors of the Global Alliance on Climate Change (GAUC), of which Sciences Po is a founding member. Three of these students – Garance Breuil, Naman Kapoor and Arimiyaw Saasi – relate this one of a kind experience.

In which context were you present at the COP 27 in November 2022? What did you learn and gain from this experience? 

Garance Breuil: I graduated from the Master Governing the Ecological Transition in European Cities of Sciences Po's Urban School and I had the opportunity to be part of the "Climate x" programme 2022 of the GAUC. Being selected as a youth ambassador of the GAUC gave me the chance to be at the COP 27, thanks to the project Brace for impact I have developed. We were indeed invited to present our projects to NGO, leaders and stakeholders. As young people, we have to be involved as it is our future that is at stake. I learned the importance of gathering all countries for action in one single place, so negotiations can be done face to face. This COP has to be a success, we have six years to deviate from our track and not go over 2.5 degrees of global warming. Actions will speak louder than words.

Naman Kapoor: After months of training during the Climate X program by GAUC and creating our final project online, the Global Youth Ambassadors part of GAUC’s Youth Delegation to COP 27 finally had a chance to meet. What comes from the experience is learning, friends and truth. The most important lesson was that we cannot let the status quo remain unchanged, especially when it comes to a potential existential threat. As much as I have gained from this experience, I have realised that we have time to solve this problem but we don’t have time to procrastinate. Nevertheless, meeting youth from around the world with sincere passion towards solving these challenges strengthens my optimism that together we can rise to the challenges and opportunities of our times, and jointly create the net-zero future for all!

Arimiyaw Saasi: I am a graduate of the Master in Environmental Policy from Science Po’s Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) and a GAUC Youth Ambassador. I often describe myself as an enthusiast of climate change and it has always been my dream to participate and learn more about the negotiation process of the COP. Since Glasgow, cataclysmic climate events have occurred more rapidly than scientist’s grimmest warning. The opportunity to participate in COP 27 helped me to expand my knowledge in climate negotiations, to advocate for youth engagement and to collaborate with fellow activists.  As a participant of  the GAUC climate summit week hosted by China Pavilion, I co-planned and moderated panel discussions on multiple topics. We, as GAUC youth delegates, also made a press statement on youth engagement in climate decision-making and implementation.

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Garance Breuil, Naman Kapoor and Arimiyaw Saasi at the COP 27. (credits: DR)

How can young students like yourselves take action on a major issue such as environmental transformation? Has your education at Sciences Po empowered you to act for change?

Garance Breuil: As students of Sciences Po, we first acquire knowledge about the stakes of climate change, in order to be ready for action. For instance, I have acquired knowledge about cities strategies for mitigation and adaptation, green mobility, circular economy, green building and many other topics. I could then apply what I learned to real life situations : when I worked as junior project manager for a real estate company, I gave insights and ideas about car sharing that spread to other departments after I convinced them of the gain it would allow. This fresh knowledge we can bring leads to more innovation. I feel the young generation is determined to refuse the status quo, which is necessary to lead for change.

Naman Kapoor: I tend to look at the problem of climate change as a multi-faceted one and attribute this habit to the Transdisciplinary Approaches to Inequalities course I chose in my first year as an undergraduate at Sciences Po. At COP 27, I had the opportunity to meet the leading minds working to solve this problem. I suggested they find ways to make the insights from their work easier for everybody to understand, particularly those that don’t have the bandwidth to understand climate change, emissions, or COP. It's hard to care about climate change when someone cannot provide the basic needs for their family. I also observed the disparity in consequences wherein the poor that contribute the least to the problem are the real victims of this problem. 

My responsibility as a person with the privilege of a world-class education and as a citizen of the world is to take charge and find solutions for climate change. Through my education at Sciences Po’s Undergraduate College, the training that I have received during GAUC’s “Climate x” programme and experiences from COP 27, I am confident that I am equipped with the tools and knowledge to advocate and take action to change the status quo. 

Arimiyaw Saasi: I believe that my academic training gave me the right tools to successfully participate in the COP 27. The design of my master’s programme allowed me to specialise in environment and sustainability with my academic training covering critical areas including climate and biodiversity finance, sustainable development, demand-side energy policies, and climate geopolitics in the net-zero context. As part of my grad studies, I also gained experience through an internship in the private sector where I worked in corporate decarbonisation strategies, environment business incubation and business development. My generation has inherited a planet beleaguered with a “trilemma” including biodiversity loss, climate change and geopolitical crisis, which underlines the urgency to prioritize sustainability. This trilemma requires that young people strongly collaborate to offer lasting solutions in order to make the world a better place, for us and the generations after us.

MORE INFORMATION:

24.11.2022

The Journey Of Three Sciences Po’s Students At The COP 27 In Egypt

alt
GAUC students day at the COP 27. (credits: DR)

Sciences Po is a leading social sciences international university, as such, the school sent a delegation of nine persons to the Conference of the Parties of the UNFCC 27 (COP 27) that took place at Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt from 6 to 18 November 2022. Some researchers, as Carola Kloeck or Charlotte Halpern, were part of the delegation but also students, as youth ambassadors of the Global Alliance on Climate Change (GAUC), of which Sciences Po is a founding member. Three of these students – Garance Breuil, Naman Kapoor and Arimiyaw Saasi – relate this one of a kind experience.

In which context were you present at the COP 27 in November 2022? What did you learn and gain from this experience? 

Garance Breuil: I graduated from the Master Governing the Ecological Transition in European Cities of Sciences Po's Urban School and I had the opportunity to be part of the "Climate x" programme 2022 of the GAUC. Being selected as a youth ambassador of the GAUC gave me the chance to be at the COP 27, thanks to the project Brace for impact I have developed. We were indeed invited to present our projects to NGO, leaders and stakeholders. As young people, we have to be involved as it is our future that is at stake. I learned the importance of gathering all countries for action in one single place, so negotiations can be done face to face. This COP has to be a success, we have six years to deviate from our track and not go over 2.5 degrees of global warming. Actions will speak louder than words.

Naman Kapoor: After months of training during the Climate X program by GAUC and creating our final project online, the Global Youth Ambassadors part of GAUC’s Youth Delegation to COP 27 finally had a chance to meet. What comes from the experience is learning, friends and truth. The most important lesson was that we cannot let the status quo remain unchanged, especially when it comes to a potential existential threat. As much as I have gained from this experience, I have realised that we have time to solve this problem but we don’t have time to procrastinate. Nevertheless, meeting youth from around the world with sincere passion towards solving these challenges strengthens my optimism that together we can rise to the challenges and opportunities of our times, and jointly create the net-zero future for all!

Arimiyaw Saasi: I am a graduate of the Master in Environmental Policy from Science Po’s Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA) and a GAUC Youth Ambassador. I often describe myself as an enthusiast of climate change and it has always been my dream to participate and learn more about the negotiation process of the COP. Since Glasgow, cataclysmic climate events have occurred more rapidly than scientist’s grimmest warning. The opportunity to participate in COP 27 helped me to expand my knowledge in climate negotiations, to advocate for youth engagement and to collaborate with fellow activists.  As a participant of  the GAUC climate summit week hosted by China Pavilion, I co-planned and moderated panel discussions on multiple topics. We, as GAUC youth delegates, also made a press statement on youth engagement in climate decision-making and implementation.

alt
Garance Breuil, Naman Kapoor and Arimiyaw Saasi at the COP 27. (credits: DR)

How can young students like yourselves take action on a major issue such as environmental transformation? Has your education at Sciences Po empowered you to act for change?

Garance Breuil: As students of Sciences Po, we first acquire knowledge about the stakes of climate change, in order to be ready for action. For instance, I have acquired knowledge about cities strategies for mitigation and adaptation, green mobility, circular economy, green building and many other topics. I could then apply what I learned to real life situations : when I worked as junior project manager for a real estate company, I gave insights and ideas about car sharing that spread to other departments after I convinced them of the gain it would allow. This fresh knowledge we can bring leads to more innovation. I feel the young generation is determined to refuse the status quo, which is necessary to lead for change.

Naman Kapoor: I tend to look at the problem of climate change as a multi-faceted one and attribute this habit to the Transdisciplinary Approaches to Inequalities course I chose in my first year as an undergraduate at Sciences Po. At COP 27, I had the opportunity to meet the leading minds working to solve this problem. I suggested they find ways to make the insights from their work easier for everybody to understand, particularly those that don’t have the bandwidth to understand climate change, emissions, or COP. It's hard to care about climate change when someone cannot provide the basic needs for their family. I also observed the disparity in consequences wherein the poor that contribute the least to the problem are the real victims of this problem. 

My responsibility as a person with the privilege of a world-class education and as a citizen of the world is to take charge and find solutions for climate change. Through my education at Sciences Po’s Undergraduate College, the training that I have received during GAUC’s “Climate x” programme and experiences from COP 27, I am confident that I am equipped with the tools and knowledge to advocate and take action to change the status quo. 

Arimiyaw Saasi: I believe that my academic training gave me the right tools to successfully participate in the COP 27. The design of my master’s programme allowed me to specialise in environment and sustainability with my academic training covering critical areas including climate and biodiversity finance, sustainable development, demand-side energy policies, and climate geopolitics in the net-zero context. As part of my grad studies, I also gained experience through an internship in the private sector where I worked in corporate decarbonisation strategies, environment business incubation and business development. My generation has inherited a planet beleaguered with a “trilemma” including biodiversity loss, climate change and geopolitical crisis, which underlines the urgency to prioritize sustainability. This trilemma requires that young people strongly collaborate to offer lasting solutions in order to make the world a better place, for us and the generations after us.

MORE INFORMATION: