“To Kill The Coronavirus, We Have to Kill the Economy”

“To kill the virus, we have to kill the economy, because the economy is about social interactions, which is exactly what we don’t want.” Sciences Po Professor of Economics Philippe Martin explains in this interview (below) conducted by The Wire that the economic freeze that we are experiencing throughout the world due to the Covid-19 pandemic is unlike anything we’ve encountered before. (April 2020)

This economic crisis is very different from a financial crisis, which typically comes from an imbalance (too much debt, too much leverage, etc.). This crisis stems from an internal shock - which, Professor Martin argues, is better in a sense because it is a shock on an economy that is not imbalanced or weakened. However, at this point in the health crisis, an economic recession - in Europe, in the United States, and in Asia - is unavoidable. The question today is how can we avoid a prolonged downturn of the world economy?

To begin to respond to this, Philippe Martin compares the responses in Europe and in the United States:

In Europe, many responses have been based on a system of a welfare state: the state is insuring workers’ income, basically on the same model used by Germany during the last financial crisis. Work contracts are preserved, and workers are paid almost or entirely by the state. The advantage to this response is that workers are not forced into unemployment - incomes may decrease but not drastically overall - and companies are spared their labour costs. This model enables the stabilisation of income and is the best way to prevent this disruption of the economy from generating a huge recession due to a fall in demand.

In the United States, due to the absence of a welfare state, unemployment has skyrocketed (from 3% to 10%; estimates predict that it may even reach 20%), which could, at the exit of the health crisis, lead to a huge economic recession due to low demand from a population with very little spending power.

In this episode of The Wire Business Report, Mitali Mukherjee interviews Professor Philippe Martin, who analyses the different economic responses to the current crisis and attempts to predict what lies ahead for the state of the world economy.

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2021 Admissions: Over 15,000 applications through the French Parcoursup platform

2021 Admissions: Over 15,000 applications through the French Parcoursup platform

For its first French undergraduate admissions campaign running entirely through the Parcoursup national platform, Sciences Po recorded 15,284 validated applications at the end of the first phase, which closed on 8 April 2021. This is double the number of applications recorded in 2020 for the French undergraduate entry procedures.

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“An interlude of wellness in this difficult context”

“An interlude of wellness in this difficult context”

To overcome the challenges of the health crisis, Sciences Po has developed new mechanisms to provide students with the best possible support. Sébastien Thubert, Director of Campus Life and Student Engagement, answered a few questions about these new initiatives.

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Undergraduate admissions: stay calm and relaxed

Undergraduate admissions: stay calm and relaxed

Each year, half of new students at the Sciences Po Undergraduate College come from outside France. Starting in 2021, all applicants - whether French or international - are evaluated in the same ways, on identical criteria, in four separate evaluations. Candidates who have obtained the required mark set by the jury in the first three evaluations will be admitted to the fourth and final one: the interview.

Here are some tips to help you prepare for the interview!

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Tēnaka: A Sciences Po start-up wins the Columbia Alliance Social Enterprise Challenge

Tēnaka: A Sciences Po start-up wins the Columbia Alliance Social Enterprise Challenge

Tēnaka, a social business founded by Anne-Sophie Roux, recent graduate of the Sciences Po School of Research and supported by the Centre for Entrepreneurship, is the winner of the 2021 Alliance Social Enterprise Challenge! This social entrepreneurship competition organized by the Columbia Alliance awards a prize of U$25,000 to support the development of a social venture project.

According to a NASA study, 27% of the world’s coral reefs have disappeared in the last 50 years, and 32% are threatened with extinction.. Yet corals are the lungs of our planet, guarantors of the balance of the Earth's ecosystem and the survival of 60 million people around the globeTēnaka is the first social enterprise that rebuilds these key ecosystems alongside corporations, scientists and local NGOs and communities. And while Tēnaka targets corporations, the programme My Coral Garden allows individuals to plant their own coral.

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CIVICA Scholars Discuss: How Have Growth Regimes Evolved?

CIVICA Scholars Discuss: How Have Growth Regimes Evolved?

How have advanced capitalist economies and their welfare systems evolved since the early 1990s? To answer this question, Bruno Palier, CNRS Research Director at Sciences Po’s Centre for European Studies, and Anke Hassel, Professor of Public Policy at the Hertie School, co-wrote the book Growth and Welfare in Advanced Capitalist Economies: How Have Growth Regimes Evolved?, recently published by Oxford University Press. The volume was discussed by distinguished scholars from CIVICA universities in a webinar on 29 March 2021. We asked the authors a few questions.

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French Graduate Admissions: Tips for the Interview

French Graduate Admissions: Tips for the Interview

You applied for a Master’s programme at Sciences Po via the French procedure* and have been pre-selected? Congratulations! Next step: the interview. This final stage of the admissions procedure will take place remotely between 19 April and 30 April 2021 (from 13 April for the Journalism School only). For many students, the interview can be the most stressful element of their application: what kind of profile are we looking for, how can you demonstrate your motivation, how best defend your ideas? Preparation is key! We've laid out some simple guidelines to help get you succeed in this final stretch.

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Food (In)Security and Waste: Lessons from the Pandemic

Food (In)Security and Waste: Lessons from the Pandemic

By Marie Mourad (Center for the Sociology of Organizations)

Since March 2020, the coronavirus pandemic has caused severe economic downturn and generated a spike in food insecurity in the country. At the same time, farmers had to destroy significant quantities of food because they could not find markets for their products. The crisis has revealed weaknesses and contradictions in our food system – but also opens up opportunities for reform.

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