13 June 2022

How Work Became a Revolutionary Concept

On the eve of the 1848 revolution, the founders of contemporary socialism—primarily Karl Marx and Pierre-Joseph Proudh——saw the working class as a unified entity: a […]
13 June 2022

Dying at Work? Industrial Society and the Relationship to Risk

On December 27, 1974, an explosion occurred in one of the tunnels of the Liévin coal mine in northern France. Forty-two miners were killed on […]
16 February 2022

The State in France and the United States: So Far, So Close

by Nicolas Barreyre, EHESS and Claire Lemercier, Center for the Sociology of Organisations (Sciences Po) Contrasting political life in France to that in the United […]
12 February 2022

Counting Populations to Better Govern?

The Birth of the Census in Spain and its Empire in the 19th Century How did the Spanish state set up a census of its […]
12 February 2022

‘Too many civil servants’: History of a Mantra

Some presidential candidates are calling for a massive reduction in the number of civil servants: they are not cost-effective enough. There is nothing new about […]
12 December 2021

Are Communicable Diseases Only Communicable?

By Catherine Cavalin, IRISSO & LIEPP, and Paul-André Rosental, Centre for History Scope and Discussion of the Epidemiological Transition For half a century, the so-called […]
8 July 2021

Reading and Rereading Halévy

A theorist of Liberalism and the Crisis of Democratic Societies By Marie Scot, Centre of History In 2015, Éditions Les Belles Lettres, in partnership with […]
8 July 2021

Writing the History of the Future

For her doctoral thesis, Sibylle Duhautois set herself the challenge of writing the history of the future as it was imagined within international organisations during […]
17 May 2021

United States: a Tired Democracy Under Attack from Trumpian Populism

By Mario Del Pero The last US elections seem to have once again shown the vitality and adaptability of American democracy. The country had record […]