The Paris Agreement: what can we expect from the US?

The Paris Agreement: what can we expect from the US?

On June 13th, the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI) welcomed Sue Biniaz, adjunct professor at Columbia Law School and the US State Department’s former lead climate attorney, to Sciences Po. Having played a key role in international climate negotiations, such as COP21 and the Paris Agreement, she delivered her analysis on what we can expect today from the US following the announcement to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.

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Redefining the Field of History

Redefining the Field of History

How does one tell the history of any given country or actor?  What role should social processes have in the discussion and analysis of international relations and politics? What is the significance of collaboration among historians?
 
Watch Professor Gienow-Hecht discuss the recent controversy and debate among historians as well as current developments and innovations in the field. 
 
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A career in research, from Sciences Po to Harvard

A career in research, from Sciences Po to Harvard

Tom Chevalier was recently awarded a John F. Kennedy Memorial Fellowship, providing him with funding to carry out a one-year research project at Harvard University's Center for European Studies. Having completed a doctoral thesis at Sciences Po which focused on how the welfare state takes care of young people across Europe, he now intends to turn his attention to the field of comparative political economy, taking a wider look at the ways institutions interact.

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How financialization has driven an increase in inequality across the world

How financialization has driven an increase in inequality across the world

The modern era has witnessed a dramatic increase in wage inequality across the developed world since the late 1990s. While previous assumptions might have predicted that Europe could resist such forces, Sciences Po researcher Olivier Godechot of MaxPo and the OSC finds that France, too, has fallen prey to increasing inequality.

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Telling history through comics

Telling history through comics

Comics have really earned their stripes in recent years and are now a research subject in their own right. Isabelle Delorme, who has just been awarded her PhD from Sciences Po’s Centre for History, is interested in what she calls “historical memory narratives in comics”: works in which authors interweave family history with general history, such as in the immensely popular Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi. What does the study of comics contribute to research? We asked Dr Delorme, a researcher who is passionate about her subject. 

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How Marine Le Pen could win the French presidential election even if she polls lower than 50%

How Marine Le Pen could win the French presidential election even if she polls lower than 50%

(By Serge Galam, Sciences Po). Never before in modern history has a French presidential election been punctuated by so many unforeseen events of all kinds, judicial and electoral. It ended up on the April 23 first-round vote with a four-way split, ranking centrist Emmanuel Macron first with 24.01%, followed by Marine Le Pen of the Front National (FN) on 21.30%. François Fillon of Les Républicains was on 20.01% and Jean-Luc Mélenchon of the far left on 19.58%. The Conversation

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Experimenting with Basic Income in Finland

Experimenting with Basic Income in Finland

On 23 February 2017, the Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Public Policies at Sciences Po hosted a talk by Olli Kangas, Director of Governmental Relations in Kela - the Finnish Social Insurance Institution, on the basic income experiment in Finland. The current Finnish government, a Center-True Finns-Conservatives coalition, launched an experiment on basic income at the start of 2017, with Olli Kangas in charge. 

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