“The question of ethics hasn’t been sufficiently addressed”

In the run up to the French presidential election, the famous weekly Paris Match invited international students from the Sciences Po Undergraduate College to shed some light on the words that matter to them in politics. Lukas Hochscheidt, 19, a German student in the dual Bachelor's degree programme with Freie Universität Berlin on the Nancy campus, chose the word ‘ethics’.

Why did you choose the word ‘ethics’?

Because I think that the question of ethics hasn’t been sufficiently addressed with regard to all the scandals that have arisen since the beginning of the presidential campaign in France. The candidates concerned try to blame the justice system and the media, analysts often refer to the presumption of innocence, and many voters believe that they are “all corrupt” at the head of state anyway. What’s missing is a substantive debate on what is acceptable or not if you’re running for president. Personally, I believe that a presidential candidate should be doubly irreproachable:legally and morally. Having no criminal record is not enough to meet both criteria.

As a German, what’s your view of the French presidential campaign?

For a German, the presidential campaign is a rather strange experience; the scandals and revelations of the past weeks would have had very different consequences in Germany. For instance, Mr. Fillon would certainly have resigned after his indictment; the same goes for Marine Le Pen who has refused to comply with a police summons. Given their history, Germans are very attached to the moral integrity of their representatives. A candidate for the Chancellery involved in a legal case? It’s completely inconceivable!

Personally, what did you get out of collaborating with a media publication like Paris Match?

It was the first time I’d taken part in this kind of editorial project, and I’m very happy to have done so. Paris Match’s supervision of my drafting helped me to use my ideas to full advantage and write a coherent and interesting article. Even if I’m not planning a career in journalism, the media remains a very important player in public life, which I will certainly have something to do with some day, no matter what field I work in myself. Being involved in this collaboration let me discover journalistic work from another point of view, and I will not forget it.
 
Related articles

Access to Sciences Po sites reestablished

Access to Sciences Po sites reestablished

After two days of blocking by a group of students mobilized against the law on the Orientation and Success of Students (ORE), the occupation of the main campus of Sciences Po Paris ended on Friday, 20 April in the early afternoon. Access to all Sciences Po sites has been reopened for students, teachers and employees. Classes have resumed normally as of Friday afternoon (3:45 pm).

More
Reconciling Human with Human Rights

Reconciling Human with Human Rights

Vanessa Topp is German but grew up in the United States. She studies Human Rights and Humanitarian Action at PSIA, the Paris School of International Affairs. Alongside her Master's, she volunteers her time and engages in aiding refugees in Paris. This summer, she plans to volunteer in a refugee camp in Greece.

More
Cheers to 10 years of SPIT

Cheers to 10 years of SPIT

This past month, SPIT, the Sciences Po International Tasting competition celebrated its 10th anniversary. A blind wine and champagne tasting competition organized by Sciences Po’s oenology association, In Vino Veritas, gathers each year twelve student teams from French and International universities at Maison Bollinger. 

More
Lifting the barriers to women entrepreneurship

Lifting the barriers to women entrepreneurship

Whether setting up a new business, negotiating a pay rise or taking on more responsibility in the workplace, women can be supported in reaching leadership positions. Sciences Po's new Women in Business Chair aims to improve understanding of the obstacles women face and spearhead action to remove them. Interview with Anne Boring, researcher in charge of the Chair. Anne’s work focuses on the analysis of gender inequalities in the professional world.

More
Corporate & Social Responsibility at the heart of the brew

Corporate & Social Responsibility at the heart of the brew

Coffee is in danger. In a context of climate change and high utilization of pesticides and fertilizers, how does a company like Nespresso innovate to be and remain a positive company, with Corporate Social Responsibility at the heart of its business and brand purpose? Arnaud Deschamps, CEO of Nespresso France, came to Sciences Po invited by the School of Management and Innovation, to share his vision and discuss the brand's engagement to save coffee while respecting farmers and the planet.

More
Rethinking the city

Rethinking the city

Patrick Le Galès, CNRS research director at Sciences Po’s Center for European Studies and Comparative Politics (CEE), dean of the Urban School and Fellow at the British Academy, has just received the prestigious CNRS silver medal. The distinction recognizes the quality of his research in political science and sociology, as well as his participation in the creation of the CEE, a leading laboratory for the social sciences in Europe, and the creation of Sciences Po’s Urban School three years ago.   

More
Summer in Paris is a moveable feast

Summer in Paris is a moveable feast

Every summer, Sciences Po opens the doors of its Parisian campus to students from all over the world for the Sciences Po Summer School. An exceptional opportunity for cultural exchange, immersion and discovery, this year’s activities programme includes theatre and cinema outings, wine tasting classes, day trips to Monet’s home and garden in Giverny, the Loire Valley castles, Normandy, Reims and more. Discover in this video some of the highlights of the 2017 edition from the students themselves.
 
More