The Nancy Campus is 20 Years Old!

Our very first regional campus hosts the European programme with a focus on Franco-German relations
  • Nancy campus © Martin Argyroglo / Sciences PoNancy campus © Martin Argyroglo / Sciences Po

In October 2000, 42 first-year and second-year students arrived on Sciences Po’s first international campus outside of Paris, in Nancy. Inaugurated by Richard Descoings, then President of Sciences Po, the Nancy campus hosts the Undergraduate College’s European programme with a focus on Franco-German relations. In twenty years, over 2,000 students have studied at the Nancy campus.

Close to Germany and Luxembourg, and an hour and a half by high-speed train from Paris, Nancy is a student town (approximately 50,000 students live and study in the city) with a strong European identity and international dimension. Visitors to Nancy discover a rich historical legacy, featuring the renowned architectural ensemble around the Place Stanislas—a Unesco World Heritage site—and the École de Nancy, the spearhead of Art Nouveau in France. The campus itself is located in a prestigious eighteenth-century building, the Hôtel des Missions Royales.

A European Specialisation with a focus on Franco-German relations

The Nancy campus hosts 300 students on its campus, for the first two years of their undergraduate degree. Students follow Sciences Po’s multidisciplinary programme in the social sciences with a geographical focus on the political, economic and social aspects of the European Union from a comparative perspective between France and Germany—the engines of European integration and community building. 

The programme is taught mainly in French with some courses in English and German. It covers major European issues such as the creation of a European political area and an integrated economic market while deepening students’ knowledge of the French and German-speaking area, particularly through the seminar run through the Alfred Grosser Chair. Students can study the languages of the region such as German, English and Italian, but also Spanish, Russian, or Swedish. Students on this campus can also choose to pursue a dual degree with University College London (UCL) or Freie Universität Berlin.

Since 2005, students of the Nancy campus take an annual study trip to a European city to visit and meet professionals of European and governmental institutions. In 2019, second-year students went to Brussels to visit the European Parliament, the European Commission, amongst others, and first-year students had the choice between Berlin or Vienna.

Campus life in Nancy also includes annual simulations of the Franco-German Council of Ministers where students take the roles of the German Chancellor and the French President. Sciences Po’s campus in Nancy is also an integral part of CIVICA, the European University of the Social Sciences.

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Back to School 2020: a "dual campus" model

Discover the modalities for the Fall 2020 semester
  • Student in the library © Paul Rentler / Sciences PoStudent in the library © Paul Rentler / Sciences Po

In response to the uncertainty facing universities worldwide with regards to the start of the next academic year, Sciences Po is mobilising to guarantee all its students as complete and demanding an education as ever. Sciences Po remains faithful to the university’s vocation of training free, critical and socially engaged minds, intellectually informed through research and interaction with professionals at the heart of our teaching. It is this wholesome and well-balanced education that will give you the means to act in a world more uncertain now than ever.

A new and innovative system will allow us to open the entirety of the university’s courses to all 14,000 students enrolled in them, as of the 14 September 2020.

In compliance with all new health regulations, Sciences Po will continue to promote the excellence of its courses and will base its new start to the academic year on three central principles:

  • Equality of access for all students to their courses, regardless of their location.
  • Hybridity of course content, which will combine remote learning and on-campus teaching.
  • Adaptability, so that all courses can be adapted according to the evolution of the health situation.

A new and adapted start to the academic year, following the “dual campus” model

Throughout the entire Autumn Semester 2020, all Sciences Po students will have access to a dual campus:

  • A digital campus, providing all course content in a variety of formats, adapted to each class. Any student will be able to complete their entire course remotely.
  • A physical campus, in the seven cities where Sciences Po is lucky enough to be based, will be open and will focus on student activities in small groups: course sessions, tutorials, group projects, small group work, supervised community activities, etc. This physical campus will, of course, remain connected to the rest of the community in order to guarantee the participation of students unable to reach our premises.

This dual campus will combine the advantages of digital and face-to-face teaching by linking them closely. It will remain flexible, so as to offer the most complete and rewarding academic experience possible, including for those who are geographically distant and regardless of how long that distance lasts. It will give special attention to the events of all kinds that punctuate life at our institution and ensure the continuity of Sciences Po’s rich student life for all. Emphasis will be placed on personalised support, in both teaching and technical matters, so as to offer all students optimal access to the digital campus.

This system will build on experience gathered since the end of February, with measures adopted across the board as of the 23 March, during which time all Sciences Po courses have been conducted remotely.

The academic staff of the Undergraduate College and each of the Graduate Schools will provide further information by mid-June regarding the pre-back to school terms as well as the curricula and course modules to be offered for the next academic year.

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Solidarity

Solidarity ©Viktoria Kurpas / ShutterstockMany organisations are currently seeking volunteers to care for individuals in isolation, to maintain a sense of community throughout confinement, and to help those who are most vulnerable and disadvantaged.

Safety Guidelines

Simple actions to help protect your health and those around you:

  1. At all times, strive to maintain a safe distance of at least 1 metre between yourself and others.
  2. Always apply barrier gestures to protect yourself and others.
  3. Uphold and champion the safety measures and barrier gestures that you are recommending to beneficiaries and other volunteers.
  4. If you are at all concerned that you might be infected, inform the association and stay at home.
  5. If you suffer from an underlying illness, only engage in remote volunteer work that you can do from home, in order to best protect your health and that of others.

Volunteer or Get Involved

  • jeveuxaider.gouv.fr (FR): urgent and local assignments from the reserve civique (government platform).
  • benevolat.fr (FR): remote assignments, supporting organisations that have been seriously affected by the current situation, facilitated by intermediary organisations.
  • Give blood with the French Blood Establishment (EFS) (FR): blood donations need to continue during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to respond to patients’ needs. You are allowed to travel to a donation centre so long as you are not experiencing any flu-like symptoms.
  • Voisins solidaires (FR): the organisation is offering a free kit entitled “Coronavirus: come together as neighbours” with the objective of helping citizens to organise mutual aid (posters, leaflets, contact details and request forms for assistance to distribute between neighbours). Download the kit (FR).
  • Frontline (FR): if you are young and in good health, get involved in the fight against the epidemic and help a frontline worker or a high-risk individual in your community by helping look after their child or doing their shopping.

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Entertainment

Entertainment ©Visual Generation / Shutterstock

Culture

Shows and concerts

Cinema

Virtual museum Tours

Cooking

Fed up of eating pasta? Join the community of student chefs at Cuisine Étudiant (FR).

Open Library Resources, eBooks and Publications

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Well-Being Activities

Physical activities

Well-Being Activities ©Unitone Vector / ShutterstockEven if rackets, balls and oars may be stowed away for some time, there is no reason why we should have to stop moving during confinement. Certain activities can be done without requiring much space or specific equipment. Classes and tips can be found all over the internet, but for quick and easy access you can also enjoy guidance from our tai chi, pilates, stretching and even yoga instructors, using the short clips that we will regularly make available here and on our Student Life Facebook page.

Tai-chi

Yoga

The Association Sportive's Programme

Check out the Association Sportive’s Facebook page for lots of ideas and tips, including a daily programme they have put together.

Also check out...

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Stay in touch

Stay in Touch ©GoodStudio / ShutterstockDuring this confinement period, we feel it is still extremely important for each and every student to maintain links with the Sciences Po community. Student associations - both cultural and athletic - are not limited to campus walls, and we know that very many of you are continuing to bring your projects to life online.

Find student associations’ digital programmes on the Sciences Po Student Life Facebook Page ( FR).

Schedule

From 30 March to 6 April

From 6 to 10 April

Zoom

The Zoom application is the new platform for all of your classes, but it can also be used to stay in touch with your community, hold video conference calls, participate in webinars, and meet for associative or personal projects online.

Find out more: All you need to know about Zoom (FR)

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Support: Resources and Services here for you

If you are alone during this confinement period, let us know

Support: Resources and Services here for you ©tanyabosyk / ShutterstockIf you are spending this confinement period alone, you can notify the Student Life Services services by filling in this form. Please do not hesitate to do so: we are here to help!

Continued Support from the Sciences Po Health Centre

The Sciences Po Health Centres of each campus remain available and equipped to help you if you need.

Particular attention is being given to psychological support: the measures of confinement adopted by the government to restrict the spread of the virus can disrupt our routine, force changes upon our daily lives and create stressful situations.

Students requiring medicinal treatment will be able to receive their medication in pharmacies, even if the prescription has expired. The validity of prescriptions has been extended until the end of May.

Adapted support for students with disabilities

Our team is here to help you establish arrangements in regards to the changes in teaching formats, to support communication between you and your professors, and to take into account any other needs that you may have at this time.

You may be eligible for support in living conditions

Student support services are available online: contact us using this form.

Help Lines

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Advice for coping with isolation

Advice for coping with isolation ©Nina Puankova / ShutterstockIn times of stress, it is important to pay attention to your own needs and feelings. A few simple practices can be helpful in coping with isolation: stay in touch with loved ones, establish a routine, don’t be afraid to log out...

Staying in touch with your community

  • Keep in touch with your loved ones and your close friends (via email, through social media, video calls, over the phone…) Set aside several moments every day for making these calls.. 
  • Offer valuable assistance to those who need you. Don’t hesitate to reach out to people who you know might be isolated and who might need help. 
  • If you are in complete isolation, you will find that many others are in the same situation! Call them regularly, catch up with one another… It will break up your isolation as well as theirs.

Find your routine

Even astronauts say so! To best habituate ourselves in this confinement period, we need to establish a routine, consisting of regular habits as well as moments of fun and leisure. Some important practices:

  • Limit time spent in bed, and if your living space allows, try to allocate a dedicated workspace.
  • Get dressed in the morning as though you were going out.
  • Prepare balanced meals at regular times of the day. 
  • Maintain physical activity at home, using the activities suggested by student societies
  • Separate your time between work and recreation (by setting out a timetable, for instance) and give yourself regular short breaks: open the window, stretch, look as far away as you are able to (to steady your eyesight). 
  • If you are working in a network with other people, greet them when you come online and signal to them when you finish working for the day - just like you would say “good morning” or “bye”! 
  • Set aside half a day, at least once a week, for rest and recuperation
  • Use an agenda, post-its, or any other tool that helps you to visualise your activities in time, and reserve windows of time in your timetable for progressing with background tasks that require more time. 

And don’t forget to schedule time for fun and leisure in your agenda! An elaborate meal, a phone call, time to meditate…

Log out regularly

  • An incessant stream of information can generate anxiety: stay informed by setting specific points during the day (such as one hour in the morning and another in the evening, or when health authorities make important announcements), and otherwise minimise time spent watching, reading, or listening to information that makes you feel anxious or distressed.
  • Try to limit your screen time (FR), which might mean taking certain measures to reduce temptation: disabling notifications, keeping track of screen time on your devices, etc.
  • Be sure to get information from reliable sources, and with the intention of organising and protecting yourself and your loved ones. Try to stick to official channels and be cautious of rumours and misinformation that frequently circulate over email and messenger services such as Whatsapp. The following two links may be helpful in this: 

If you are in self-isolation

If you are alone in self-isolation, let the Student Life Services know using this form. Please do not hesitate to do so: we are here to help!

If you are taking care of children

  • During this isolation period, when all routine seems to be disrupted, children can experience stress, and might express this in various ways: by being more “clingy”, anxious, elusive, irritable, agitated, or with behaviours such as beginning to wet the bed again. They also observe adults’ emotions, behaviours, and reactions, looking for cues for managing their own emotional upset during this difficult time.
  • Try to respond sympathetically to these changes in behaviour. Listen to their worries, which will often be particular to their age, and give them more affection and attention than usual. Help them find constructive ways to express their emotions, and join in with creative activities (games, drawing…) that can help them to share their emotions. If they have questions, talk to your children sincerely and honestly about COVID-19, using age-appropriate vocabulary.
  • For yourself as well as for them, try to keep your routine as close as possible to normal, and organise every day a rotation between “serious” time (devoted to learning and exercise, for example) and time for relaxation (naps, play, etc). If you are not able to “homeschool” as well as you would like to, or if your child is not cooperating, remember that it’s not the end of the world: sometimes exceptional circumstances require us to be more lenient than usual!

If you have specific health conditions

If you have a cognitive impairment, you may be feeling more anxiety, stress or agitation than usual, or the desire to withdraw. Allow yourself to be supported by your family and friends, if you find this support helpful and effective, or contact a professional or a specialist service.

If you suffer from a chronic illness, ensure that you have at least 15 days worth of medication. If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact people in your community or the Sciences Po Health Centre.

If you are a person at high risk, or if you are feeling anxious, plan ahead by writing a list of numbers you might need with contact details for medical services, food delivery services, and family and friends who would be able to help you.

Sources

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Student Life During Confinement

Advice and resources on how to stay calm, cope, look after yourself, and keep learning under these circumstances.
  • Experience your confinement in a serene and peaceful way ©Marish / ShutterstockExperience your confinement in a serene and peaceful way ©Marish / Shutterstock

With the COVID-19 pandemic and measures of confinement in effect in France and many other countries, we are navigating an unprecedented period, one for which we have had little time to prepare ourselves. While circumstances may seem different for every one of us, and although some may appear to have less difficulty adapting than others, it is important to remember that the situation is and remains disorienting for us all.

The following information aims to provide you with advice for making it calmly through the confinement period with the support of the teams at Sciences Po. You will also find below some guidelines for continuing to spend time together and stay in touch (online!), to relax, to keep learning, or to help others - depending on your wishes and your availability… Your peace of mind should be the priority!

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Covid-19: Letter to our Communities

In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, Olivier Duhamel and Frédéric Mion address our communities
  • Le jardin de Sciences Po © Sandrine Gaudin / Sciences PoLe jardin de Sciences Po © Sandrine Gaudin / Sciences Po

Frédéric Mion, Director of Sciences Po, and Olivier Duhamel, President of the FNSP, address our communities in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, in this communication sent on March 16, 2020. For the latest updates on the situation at Sciences Po and frequently asked questions, visit our Covid-19 Information page.

Dear students, faculty and colleagues,

Over the last few weeks, Sciences Po, like our entire country, has been mobilised to deal with an unprecedented phenomenon, the coronavirus COVID-19 epidemic.

Following the announcements made by the French President and Prime Minister, and in accordance with the instructions we have received from the Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation, as of today, all Sciences Po sites in Paris and the regional campuses will be closed until further notice.

In these grave and exceptional circumstances, please be assured that Sciences Po, in all its constituent parts, is fully mobilised around one essential objective: ensuring the continuity of the essential activities of our institution while preserving the health of all.

You have already been informed of the various arrangements that we have made so far. The Sciences Po teams continue to develop and implement the changes necessary to ensure the smooth running of our institution.

Most importantly, we would like to thank each and every one of you for the patience, understanding, spirit of responsibility and solidarity you have shown since the beginning of this crisis. These virtues will no doubt, alas, be put to further good use in the days and weeks to come. We have no doubt that you will continue to deploy them.

We would also like to express our deepest gratitude and pay tribute to the teams at Sciences Po who have been working tirelessly with admirable dedication, to ensure that our institution can continue to fulfil its mission.

The ordeal that we are currently experiencing goes far beyond the confines of our institution and our communities. It requires us to demonstrate composure, adaptability and a sense of innovation, so that the educational, scientific and intellectual life of our institution may continue in new ways. It also demands that we rally around Sciences Po's fundamental values: knowledge, reflection, debate, exchange and sharing.

With sincere and warm regards,

Olivier Duhamel                      Frédéric Mion
President of the FNSP             Director of Sciences Po

More information

Covid-19: Latest Updates from Sciences Po and Frequently Asked Questions

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COVID-19: Remote learning

Documents and tutorials for getting started with remote learning
  • © AHGraphic / Shutterstock© AHGraphic / Shutterstock

In order to ensure the pedagogical continuity of your learning, you will have access to a new web-conference service called Zoom. You will be invited by your teachers to join your classes remotely, and you will also be able to create your own meetings for study and group work. You can also use this service to contact your families and thus keep a social link with your loved ones, friends, etc.

You will find below all the documents and tutorials for getting started with this service. We particularly invite you to read the document "Remote learning" in which you will find the operating methods and training tutorials.

How to use ZOOM

Any Questions ?

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Paving the Way For A Green Future

PAVéS: the self-managed and green student association
  • CAFéS at 28 rue Saint Pères ©Sciences PoCAFéS at 28 rue Saint Pères ©Sciences Po

Eco-friendly, self-managed, and militant, PAVéS is an association committed to tackling questions on climate change at Sciences Po. But it is also well known by students for CAFéS, its ethical and solidarity-focused cafeteria run by students from the Paris campus. We met to talk with two of its members, Ilytie Piroit and Clémentine Sainclair, over an organic coffee. 

What is PAVéS?

Ilytie Piroit: PAVéS is a self-governed, active student association which is essentially orientated around political ecology. The association was created in 2005 in the context of the student protests over the “CPE”, or the First Employment Contract.

Clémentine Sainclair: PAVéS stands for “Plateforme Autogérée à Visée écologique et Solidaire”, or self-governing platform for ecology and solidarity. It is an association which is a springboard for creating and supporting all initiatives linked to ecology and solidarity work. It is also an association that speaks up, as we have a critical view of the productivist and liberal model and its social and ecological consequences. But we also go beyond that by proposing concrete alternatives - even if they are far from being perfect - to what we are against.

What does the association do?

IP: Our two main projects are CAFéS, our self-managed cafeteria, and Sciences Potirons, the school’s AMAP (fruit and vegetable co-operative). The cafeteria takes up a lot of our time, we have about 70 people who work there. It is a meeting place and also a space for debate; we try to forge links with people and to talk about ecology. Thanks to fundraising, we are able to fund projects every term. As for the AMAP, about 300 people benefit weekly from a basket of organic vegetables. These are our main projects, but there are also lots of initiatives which vary year to year. For example: the ethical and solidarity careers fair, orders of reusable menstrual cups, board-game evenings with the association Rolling Dice at CAFéS, and support for Sciences Po Refugee Help and Paris Solidaires. 

CS: We co-organise the Semaine de l’Agriculture paysanne in partnership with several other Parisian universities - this year, with Ecole Polytechnique, the Sorbonne and AgroParisTech - and with the Amis de la Confédération paysanne. Throughout the week we aim to raise awareness surrounding the challenges faced by farmers. For example, we have a lecture on where mass retail fits into a sustainable agricultural system, and a celebratory apéro and other talks. 

Are debate and discussion important for you?

CS: Yes, more than anything we try to contribute to debates about ecology and solidarity. PAVéS slogan is “moins de biens, plus de liens”, which means “fewer goods, greater ties”. As well as being a place where we sell things, our cafeteria is above all a place for discussion, where the coffee becomes a pretext for starting conversation: “We are selling you an organic, fairtrade coffee which comes from this country, why this choice? Let’s talk about it!” But we can also just talk about your day, exams, etc. At CAFéS we are all students, even those of us who are on the other side of the counter!

IP: We strongly encourage discussion and debate! Some people for example put forward their arguments for vegetarianism, whilst others question different ways to protest for climate justice etc. All of this comes out of debate, without us forcing a specific dogma. People have very different positions surrounding such things.

A self-managed association, what does that mean?

CS: The association works horizontally, we do not have a superior decision maker when it comes to group decisions and anyone is free to put forward their own ideas. Anyone who invests their time in the association has as legitimate a claim to make their voice heard and to decide freely how involved they want to be. 

IP: For example, somebody who goes and gets their vegetable basket from Sciences Potirons, has as much of a right to take part in decision-making as someone who has been involved with several projects. Also, we think that all members have equal responsibility in the day-to-day working of the association. Thus, for anybody who wishes to propose a project… they just do it! PAVéS in turn will provide them with the resources to get their project started. 

On a larger scale, what do you think we need to do today so that people know more about ecology and discuss it more often?

IP: At PAVéS, we turn ideas into reality. If they work, it is because people are ready to start the transition and we then offer them a space to grow their project. Nevertheless, few people at PAVéS think that this is enough. Governments and institutions, like Sciences Po, need to put real policies into action, which join together the social and the environmental in an approach where the economy and politics work in the interests of humans and nature. This is our political and ecological vision. 

CS: In order for people to understand ecology, I think we need to be careful that we do not depoliticise it by making it a simple question of a way of life and individual choice. Although the changes and actions each individual takes are very important, it is the whole economic and political system that we need to rethink to create an ecological society.

What are your ambitions for the future?

IP: That all our projects grow bigger! But we keep in mind that when projects grow, you also risk losing control of the quality of things. It would be great if, above all, our projects have a bigger impact! More concretely, we are currently thinking about a second cafeteria project at Sciences Po and we have also suggested to set up a self-managed cafeteria on the future campus of Sciences Po which will open in 2022. We are also working hard to create a “CAFéS Network”; we would like to group together student initiatives like ours in one forum. The aim is to promote the model; we have created a file which describes how to easily set up a self-managed cafe in a university. We realised that people would often ask us questions and that we have developed a true expertise in this field.

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Ecological Transition: Sciences Po Launches a Three-Year Action Plan

Courses, research, campus: all the measures
  • Paris campus - the garden ©Martin Argyroglo/Sciences PoParis campus - the garden ©Martin Argyroglo/Sciences Po

In the face of a climate in crisis and a planet experiencing profound ecological disruption, Sciences Po has set itself an ambitious three-year action plan. This plan will form one part of the much wider Climate Action: Make It Work initiative, launched in 2015. It responds to the institution’s obligations as both a place of study and work and a centre for teaching and learning, in Paris and across the six regional campuses.

Putting environment at the heart of teaching and research

Sciences Po also recognises its responsibility as a site of teaching and the transmission of knowledge. Meeting regularly between April and October 2019, our research and teaching review committee, led by Bruno Latour, has produced an encouraging first report on the place of environmental concerns within our educational ecosystem. A significant and varied range of teaching and research on the environment already exists, which now needs to be expanded and rendered more visible and more accessible to a wider audience. This is the objective of the 2020-2023 roadmap (fr, pdf, 120 Kb) that the institution has set for itself with regards to teaching and research. The roadmap establishes environmental issues as a priority theme for the university, which should feed into all aspects of our teaching and research. Key measures include: 

At undergraduate level

  • The creation of a mandatory core course on the history/sociology of the environment
  • Introduction of exploratory seminars and active educational exercises on each campus
  • An ecological issues certification
  • More opportunities within this field for the Civic Learning Programme

At master’s level

  • A core foundational course in environmental issues for all master’s students
  • Creation of a skills certificate
  • New dual degrees on ecological issues

For doctoral students

  • Creation of an interdisciplinary programme of doctoral research on the subject
  • Creation of a summer school to introduce candidates to the challenges of social science research on the environment

For research

  • Recruitment of at least 15 academics working on issues related to environmental disruption between now and 2023. 

10 Objectives for a “Sustainable Campus”

Sciences Po has also taken action as an organisation, presenting a action plan to reduce the ecological footprint of all its campuses and activities (pdf, 150 Kb). Directly inspired by our climate consultation, organised with students, teachers, and employees in November 2019, this plan takes the form of ten concrete objectives that will reduce our carbon consumption over the next three years:

  1. Reduce pollutant professional trips
  2. Reduce our water and energy consumption
  3. Reduce digital pollution
  4. Reduce single-use plastic waste
  5. Reduce paper consumption
  6. Improve recycling
  7. Promote reuse
  8. Plant new green spaces and implement sustainable management of existing ones
  9. Reinforce our policy on responsible purchasing
  10. Improve the catering offering on our campuses

This plan will build on various other initiatives launched over the course of the last few years: our eco-responsible travel policy, introduced in 2018, the establishment of environmental specifications in public tenders as of 2014, the removal of plastic bottles from our campuses in 2019, communal printer-photocopiers, recycling of waste, and so on.

These institutional commitments follow on from agreements made by Sciences Po and partner universities at the U7+ Alliance international summit, and as part of its collaboration in the European University project, CIVICA. “These plans are the result of a collaboration across the entirety of Sciences Po, with the common goal of taking firm action in response to the climate crisis and mobilising to prepare the world of tomorrow, both with and for our communities", summarised Frédéric Mion, Director of Sciences Po.

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"The Environment is at the heart of students' concerns"

Interview of Carole Meffre, coordinator of the student association Sciences Po Environnement
  • Portrait of Carole Meffre ©Judith Azéma / Sciences PoPortrait of Carole Meffre ©Judith Azéma / Sciences Po

Involved in the association Sciences Po Environnement (FR) since her first year at Sciences Po, Carole Meffre is the coordinator of the Paris campus chapter today, and a master’s student at the School of Public Affairs. She discusses the vision and the challenges of this flagship fixture of campus life which is celebrating its 12th year in 2020.

You joined Sciences Po Environnement during the first year of your bachelor’s degree. You are now a master’s student. What are the reasons behind this long-standing commitment? How has the association evolved over the years?

The environment was one of the main topics of my personal statement when I applied to Sciences Po: my concerns about the subject went back a few years. However, I was truly a novice back then, contrary to the students who join us today: they’re well informed, proactive, and are often deeply invested in multiple associations. They often contact us for information even before arriving at Sciences Po! In the past few years, Sciences Po Environnement has evolved greatly: it’s now a permanent and national structure which brings together more than 250 people across seven campuses. Above all, when the association was born 12 years ago, the subject was considered marginal… Today, the environment is at the heart of students’ concerns. Nonetheless, this doesn’t mean we don’t spend a lot of time trying to convince students to take action at all levels, both individually and collectively. 

Today you’re the coordinator for the Paris campus, but you’ve previously occupied other positions within the association. What is Sciences Po Environnement’s role?

We have two missions: on the one side, raising awareness among the student community, and on the other, the transformation of Sciences Po into a sustainable establishment. We organise a large number of events, conferences, themed weeks - most recently, the European Week for Waste Reduction - and very diverse activities that range from thrift sales to cooking classes and DIY workshops. The sensitisation also works through student services, with very simple things like our ‘tassothèque’ (tasse = mug) which allows students to borrow mugs and avoid using disposable cups. But we’re not going to content ourselves with just this: individual actions are necessary, but are not at all sufficient in the face of climate change. We thus have another mission which focuses on eco-empowerment within Sciences Po.

What message and what actions do you undertake on this theme?

Sciences Po Environnement is one of five permanent associations: it is a particularity of Sciences Po. We rely on this strength to project a message of transformation at the level of our own university: this is the objective of our Sustainable Campus team. We have a place at the debate table, and we try to be constructive, professional and credible. We look at what is practiced elsewhere to show what works, not only in France but also in the international universities that students discover during their year abroad. It is a long-term job, not always easy to reconcile with turnover, which is the rule in a student association, but we obtain results, such as a compost, the vegetable garden or waste-sorting. However, from our point of view, these accomplishments are still too few, and we want the institution to be more ambitious, especially in terms of its carbon footprint. We now have a single contact with the new Chief Sustainability Officer at Sciences Po, which is a good sign. Overall, we are also campaigning for more environmental education in our courses - we are eagerly awaiting the report from the Latour committee which has been commissioned to present its findings on the subject. We hope that the initiatives will become a fundamental movement on practices and lessons.

Would you say that Sciences Po Environnement is a political association?

We are a political association, but not a partisan one! For us the environment is without question an issue that transcends all political parties. We try our best to unite all the different trends in political ecology, but this ecumenism is not without debate! But that's what I find fascinating. Some are also involved in other projects, in their own party, neighborhood or city. Others reconcile their commitment to the association with other modes of action, occasional mobilisations, and even civil disobedience. Sciences Po Environnement remains a gateway for students who want to get involved in ecology: it aims to remain wide open!

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Social Sciences Through the Prism of Gender

PRESAGE celebrates 10 years of existence
  • Hélène Périvier and Françoise Milewski ©Thomas ArrivéHélène Périvier and Françoise Milewski ©Thomas Arrivé

PRESAGE, Sciences Po’s Research and Educational Programme on Gender Studies, was created in 2010. With the triple aim of promoting gender-related research, developing the university’s curriculum, and disseminating knowledge within the field, PRESAGE was among the first cross-cutting, interdisciplinary research programmes dedicated to gender studies in France. Meet its founders, Hélène Périvier et Françoise Milewski, both researchers at the Paris-based Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques (OFCE). 

How did PRESAGE come in to being?

Hélène Périvier: The PRESAGE programme was born out of my first encounter with Françoise Milewski. We were both economists at the French Economic Observatory (OFCE), one of Sciences Po’s research centres, and we found that we had a shared interest in issues of gender equality, inequality, discrimination, and the whole concept of gender in general.

Françoise Milewski: In 2010 there were a few people at Sciences Po working on these themes but their research was not really visible to the wider public. That’s what made us want to create a multidisciplinary programme that could incorporate both teaching and research.

Hélène Périvier: The idea was to build bridges between research and public debate. Academic research on the subject is extremely rich – conceptually but also in terms of controversy – yet it doesn’t always seem to feed into public debate. That seemed a shame to us because, while each of us may have our own view on issues of gender equality, in reality it is a subject of eminent complexity.

How are gender studies perceived and taught at Sciences Po?

Hélène Périvier: The term ‘gender studies’ is often used to describe a fairly restricted field of research, which looks at issues of sexual identity, sexuality, and socially constructed identity. At Sciences Po we use the term much more broadly to incorporate the study and better understanding of the origins of gender inequality but also of discrimination of all kinds: discrimination on the basis of sexuality, appearance, sex, ethnicity, and so on. The approach to gender here is extremely varied and the axis of the social sciences has a clear impact: Sciences Po’s five key disciplines – history, sociology, political sciences, economy and law – are all brought to bear on the wider field of gender.

Françoise Milewski: What’s really important for us at PRESAGE is the interdisciplinary, cross-cutting approach, which is a question of outlook as much as procedure. The fact of gender studies having its place amongst the body of other research centres at Sciences Po generates exchange between disciplines and reinforces the scientific nature of the work that the centre produces.

10 years on since the creation of the programme, how do you feel about how far it has come?

Hélène Périvier: We’re pretty pleased. We have always been made to feel extremely welcome and our colleagues have contributed enthusiastically to the success of the programme. I could cite Bruno Perreau, now a professor at MIT, Janine Mossuz-Lavau, who was one of the first researchers at Sciences Po to work on themes of gender, and then, of course, the members of our steering committee: Marta Dominguez Folgueras, Réjane Sénac, Elissa Mailänder and Marie Mercat-Bruns.

We have also had the warm support of the philosopher of feminist thought Geneviève Fraisse, who has only taught once over the course of her academic career and chose to do that at Sciences Po. It was a very proud moment! We are also grateful to Françoise Héritier, who supported us a great deal and whose presence on the academic landscape is sorely missed.

Françoise Milewski: Our greatest satisfaction is to have championed interdisciplinarity in research and teaching and to have been able to develop teaching which remains open to the contradictions existing in the field. PRESAGE’s researchers have contributed to academic but also popular debates in relation to current affairs.
Hélène Périvier: We have just established an Advanced Certification in Gender Studies, which will allow Sciences Po graduates with a firm grounding in the field of gender studies to highlight that for potential employers or other institutions. Going forward, we hope to develop the range of courses on offer still further. We are also planning to devise a rolling programme of training courses on gender equality for people already in employment.

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Ekota: Helping Migrants in the Face of Climate Change

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  • The founders of EKOTA ©EKOTAThe founders of EKOTA ©EKOTA

Mas Mahmud and Leen Youssef, former refugees and alumni of Sciences Po, transformed their experiences into a mission to help displaced persons while taking action to counter climate change. Interview.

You recently launched an association called EKOTA. Can you tell us about it? What is the significance of the name EKOTA?

We are four co-founders who share the same values ​​and ideas. A large number of actors work to address the issues of integration of displaced persons (refugees, asylum seekers, migrants, stateless persons). However, we believe displaced persons often know best what their needs are, as well as the barriers they face when addressing those needs. Their awareness of their own resilience and strengths puts them in a better position to act than external actors. Members of host societies that interact daily with displaced persons also have a deeper understanding of integration. The equal participation of these two groups in integration programmes and measures can strengthen support and social cohesion.

That is why we created EKOTA, which means 'unity' in Bengali, with the aim to facilitate and highlight collective and individual actions that address integration issues faced by displaced persons while contributing to raising awareness on climate crisis. Our ultimate objective is to ensure that refugees become actors as opposed to subjects.

Regarding your own journey as a refugee, what were the greatest challenges you had to overcome?

Leen: Starting over is never easy. The language was one of the biggest barriers, but administrative procedures and making new friends were also challenging. Finding a way to validate experiences and transform skills into a job opportunity and trying to build a new life with the weight of the old on our shoulders are not easy, but with our resilience and the support of the host community we manage to do it.

Mas: I would argue that for me there are three challenges: first, constantly being disapproved of and not taken seriously, as a form of stigmatisation and victimisation, especially by those working in the humanitarian field. Second, finding a balance between my life at home and my life here surrounded by a newly built support system is very challenging. Third, just as most displaced persons, another challenge is to be professionally integrated in the employment sector. Overall, because I work in the humanitarian and migration sector, my personal experiences of displacement and the emotions derived from them could also hinder my professional input in some ways.

Leen Youssef and Mas Mahmud

Are there certain issues that impact the lives of displaced persons that are overlooked in the mainstream discussion on the subject of migration?

Leen: All policies and efforts go towards fulfilling basic needs and because we are still struggling with the basics, many problems are overlooked, such as psychological health: there are problems like isolation, depression, post-traumatic stress disorders, the challenges of adapting to a new culture, dealing with grief and loss; these problems affect employment and integration and they are seen as secondary problems and sometimes not even acknowledged or considered. That's why it's important to include persons concerned in all aspects of policy and programming, letting them speak and taking into consideration their views. And in addition to this, the fulfilment is based on the needs of the host society who receive them directly, not just displaced persons - and we need to take both points of view into consideration.

Your goal with EKOTA is to link the fields of migration and sustainability. Can you tell us more about how and why these issues are intertwined?

Mas: The climate crisis will lead to more displacement in the decades to come. It will be necessary to be prepared and anticipate responding to a large number of displaced persons who are likely to have different needs. We aim to link migration and sustainability by working with displaced persons and members of host societies to reduce their individual environmental footprint and raise awareness on the issue. Drawing on the lessons learned, we aim to provide our understanding of the root causes of displacement, the different needs of displaced persons due to the climate crisis and provide support to actors to better respond to these needs.

Do you feel that the media treats the subject of migration fairly?

Leen: I feel migration is often associated with threats to the host society. As a carrier and facilitator of news, the media plays a role in contributing to creating fear, in a sense of losing cultural identity due to migration influx, and by using terms such as ‘crisis’. It also plays a role in creating and spreading negative connotations around migration issues, mainly by portraying displaced persons as a mass of people who are primarily vulnerable and in need, and not distinguishing between migration and forced displacement. Migrants are also instrumentalised, especially around election periods.

EKOTA is hosting its first event on 23 December. Can you tell us about it; what is the purpose of this event?

Mas: It is important to come together and share the spirit of Christmas. Many among us, including refugees, are not able to do so. Traditional actors tend to be absent during the festive period. Therefore, we are organising a festive dinner event to create social bonds and promote social cohesion. This event aims at bringing marginalised displaced individuals and Parisians together in the hope that people from different backgrounds can celebrate the end of year festive activities together. We are also asking for people to support us in organising this event by contributing to our crowdfunding campaign.

What are your hopes for the association in one, two, five years from now?

Mas: During the first couple of years, we aim to facilitate the roles of displaced persons with any and all actors that work with them and addressing the issue of climate crisis by:

  • organising workshops on reducing individual carbon footprints;
  • organising awareness raising campaigns on issues faced by displaced persons;
  • strengthening the capacities and resilience of displaced individuals and accompanying them in becoming self-sufficient.

Our goals for the association in five years’ time are broader. We aim to ensure that displaced persons possess the ability to influence each decision that affects their well-being, and that these decisions are bolstered through their equal and meaningful participation - while also contributing to the shift towards a sustainable and carbon-neutral society.

If you could change something immediately, from today, what would it be?

Leen: I would enact strict legislation against smugglers who endanger the lives of displaced persons and threaten their families, forcing them to work illegally during their displacement, and often in host societies, to pay off huge debts.

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Have you heard about the Welcome Programme ?

The deadline for registration is 9 December 2019, 10am
  • Welcome Programme Student ©O.H.N.K / Sciences PoWelcome Programme Student ©O.H.N.K / Sciences Po

What is the Welcome Programme?

The Welcome Programme is an integration week for exchange students which will be held in the campus of Paris from 20 to 25 January 2020 and which will offer you the possibility of:

  • Learning the methodology of Sciences Po
  • Understanding French political life
  • Knowing Sciences Po and its functioning
  • Discovering Paris in the best conditions
  • Meeting other international students of more than 50 different nationalities

What are the highlights of the Welcome Programme?

  • An opening ceremony accompanied by a welcome breakfast
  • Workshops on the working methodology, to integrate more effectively into the pedagogy of Sciences Po
  • A conference on French political life
  • Information sessions on housing, administrative registrations, residence cards and student associations
  • Campus visits and an "escape game" in the library
  • Cultural activities: Orsay Museum, discovery of Paris, boat tours on La Seine, wine and cheese tasting
  • Integration activities: Ice breakers, French-speaking times, ...

These activities are offered in French and in English, according to your choice of language during the registration to the Welcome Programme.

How to register?

If you wish to participate in the Welcome Programme, you can register on your Sciences Po student account.

The deadline for registration is 9 December 2019, 10am.

Please note that this programme is optional and costs 250 euros.

Contact us

Student Exchange Team: candidature.echange@sciencespo.fr

Find out more

Welcome Programme for exchange students on the Paris campus.

126 Mastercard Scholars to study at Sciences Po

An exceptional scholarship programme for students from Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Current Mastercard scholars ©Sciences PoCurrent Mastercard scholars ©Sciences Po

The Mastercard Foundation, partnered with Sciences Po, provides full scholarships to students from Sub-Saharan Africa who have great academic potential but limited financial resources. Over six years (from 2017 to 2023), this programme will support a total of 126 students admitted to its undergraduate, graduate and summer programmes. This exceptional scholarship programme aims to recruit talented students who aspire to shape the future of the African continent and help them develop their full potential.

In 2020, 5 scholarships at the Bachelor’s level, 15 scholarships at the Master’s level and 12 scholarships for the Summer School will be awarded to students from Sub-Saharan African countries with an outstanding academic record and strong leadership potential, but who face financial and other barriers to higher education.

Mastercard Foundation scholarships are awarded in collaboration with a network of partner institutions authorised to nominate candidates. 

Deadlines to apply are December 5, 2019 for the Master's scholarship, January 29, 2020 for the Bachelor's scholarship and January 19, 2020 for the Summer School scholarship.

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Stiglitz et Zelizer, doctors honoris causa

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  • J.P. Fitoussi, J. Stiglitz, V. Zelizer and J. Lazarus ©Alexis LecomteJ.P. Fitoussi, J. Stiglitz, V. Zelizer and J. Lazarus ©Alexis Lecomte

During a moving ceremony on 13 November 2019, Sciences Po awarded the sociologist Viviana Zelizer and the economist Joseph Stiglitz the titles of Docteur honoris causa. This distinction was given to Dr. Zelizer for her work as the founder of a new school of economic sociology, and to Dr. Stiglitz as the figure of the new Keynesian economy. The invaluable contributions made to their respective disciplines were highlighted in the praises of Jeanne Lazarus and Jean-Paul Fitoussi, respectively.

Created in 1918, the title of Doctor honoris causa is one of the most prestigious distinctions awarded by French higher education institutions to honour "people of foreign nationalities because of outstanding services to science, literature or the arts, to France or to the higher education institution that awards the title."

Source: Sorbonne Université

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Sustainable campus: share your ideas and vote!

An online consultation is open from 4 to 15 November 2019
  • An online consultation is open from 4 to 15 November 2019An online consultation is open from 4 to 15 November 2019

How can Sciences Po become a more sustainable university and workplace? An online consultation, "Sustainable Campus", is open now until 15 November in order to gather your ideas, proposals and votes to help us become a more ecologically responsible university. This consultation is one of the pillars of our Climate Action: Make it Work initiative and concerns all of the Sciences Po campuses.

To participate, visit the Climate Action: Make It Work collaborative platform and log in using your Sciences Po address.

You can suggest one or more ideas and/or vote on other ideas amongst any of the six themes of the consultation:

  • Waste Management
  • Transport & Food
  • Suppliers & Partners
  • Energy Consumption
  • Green Spaces
  • Events & Debates

Following the consultation, the ideas with the most votes under each theme will be subject to a comprehensive review. These ideas along with a summary of all contributions will be presented to the governing entities of Sciences Po. This consultation will nourish the institutional action plan on sustainability and our ecological transition, which will be presented early 2020 by our sustainability officer.

We're counting on you !

Reims students will now study in the Dean Awn Library

A Tribute to the Late Dean Emeritus of Columbia University’s School of General Studies
  • The Reims campus library, renamed in honor of Peter J. Awn ©Martin ArgyrogloThe Reims campus library, renamed in honor of Peter J. Awn ©Martin Argyroglo

Energetic. Supportive. Eccentric. Intellectual. Non-traditional. Witty. Brilliant. Passionate. When colleagues and alumni are asked to describe the late Dean Emeritus Peter J. Awn of the Columbia University School of General Studies, adjectives begin to flow. As of September 2019, his name will adorn the state-of-the-art library of our Reims campus.

On September 4th, 2019, current Dean of General Studies of Columbia University, Lisa Rosen-Metsch, the President of Sciences Po, Frédéric Mion, former Vice-President of International Affairs, Francis Verillaud, the Dean of the Undergraduate College, Stéphanie Balme, campus director, Tilman Turpin, family, friends, alumni and current students, gathered on the Reims campus for a dedication ceremony that would name the campus library after the late Dean Awn.

Dean of the School of General Studies from 1997 to 2017, Peter Awn, together with Francis Verrillaud, was the co-founder of the dual BA program between Columbia University and Sciences Po. Their shared vision of a world-class, international and multicultural education resulted in the creation of a program that would allow students to study two years at Sciences Po (in Reims, Le Havre or Menton), and two years at Columbia University in the city of New York.

According to students and colleagues, both past and present, Peter J. Awn was more than just a professor or a Dean - he was an inimitable institution of the Morningside campus. His fame was not limited to Columbia, however, as he was well-loved and respected by all who had the privilege of meeting him. He possessed an inexhaustible desire to improve the lives of students, and it was this shared desire that helped Columbia University and Sciences Po make the dual BA program between Columbia University and Sciences Po the success it is today. But his role did not end there: Dean Awn visited the three participating campuses twice a year, meeting students from the incoming cohorts and ensuring that they already felt part of Columbia University. President Mion described him as a francophile, and Vice-Dean Curtis Rodgers recounted how much he cherished meeting students during his bi-annual visits to France.

Dean Awn was part of the School of General Studies for four decades, and it is not difficult to understand why he became almost synonymous with the institution. “GS” (as it is informally known) was created in 1947 with the purpose of allowing WWII veterans to return to university and rebuild their lives. A former Jesuit priest-turned-scholar of Islam, Dean Awn believed in second chances, and so he took this vision and expanded it to all 'non-traditional' students (be it veterans, performers, entrepreneurs, career-changers, or clergymen) who had had to interrupt their higher education or start at a later age due to various circumstances. The dual BA, launched in 2010, was perhaps the most innovative extension of these values.

Awn, who had since retired from the position of Dean but continued to teach at Columbia University, kept a close relationship with students and alumni of the dual BA until his death in February 2019. Sciences Po chose to honour its colleague and friend through the naming of the recently created Reims campus library, a place of intellectual reflection and curiosity.

The dedication ceremony was conducted in the former refectory, where campus director Tilman Turpin, President Mion, Vice-Dean Curtis Rodgers, Francis Verillaud, Dean Rosen-Metsch, Elif Naz Coker, an alumna of the program, as well as Norman Laurila, a lifelong friend of Dean Awn, addressed the gathering. In a poignant series of tributes, speakers recounted memories, told anecdotes, and paid their respects to a figure who dedicated his life to the pursuit of excellence in education, but most importantly, to education that is accessible to all. To close the ceremony, President Mion and Dean Rosen-Metsch unveiled the plaque honouring Dean Awn that will henceforth adorn the entrance of the bibliothèque, a sacred space that symbolizes knowledge and education and where students spend countless hours during their studies.

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No Barriers to Education: Financial Aid at Sciences Po

4 in 10 Sciences Po students benefit from financial aid
  • ©Caroline Maufroid / Sciences Po©Caroline Maufroid / Sciences Po

At Sciences Po, we firmly believe that financial barriers should not get in the way of education. That is why each year we dedicate 10.5 million euros in scholarships and financial aid. Thanks to this proactive social policy, every year we help 4 in 10 students (figures from 2017-2018).

1 in 3 students studies for free

Sciences Po’s first engagement in its social policy is carried out in its tuition fees. In 2005, Sciences Po devised an innovative system for students of the European Economic Area: tuition fees are determined according to household income, on a sliding scale with 14 different rates of tuition. The first of these 14 ranks, is the zero fee level. This fee waiver is not just applicable to CROUS scholarship holders, but also to non-scholarship holders from low income backgrounds, and to all students with a disability. The result: 1 in 3 students were exempt of tuition fees in 2017-2018. 

What is a CROUS scholarship?

European students who have studied in France for at least one year are eligible to apply for the CROUS need-based scholarship. These need-based scholarships are awarded by the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research to students under 28 years of age depending on family situation and household income. In 2016, 26% of Sciences Po students were CROUS scholarship fellows.

Living cost loans for hassle-free study

For students from a low-income background, studying for free may not be enough: living costs can be just as expensive. That is why all European students benefiting from the CROUS scholarship – 26% of our students in the 2017/2018 academic year – are also entitled to additional financial aid from Sciences Po, as a top-up to fee exoneration. Any Sciences Po student falling within the lowest CROUS percentile receives 971 euros a month, as opposed to 555 euros a month at any other French institution (2017 figures). In the 2017/2018 academic year, these grants allowed 2,400 European students to complete their studies free of financial constraints.

Faithful to its European commitments, Sciences Po makes additional efforts to help European scholarship students. Although European students aren’t eligible for a CROUS scholarship until their second year in France, Sciences Po substitutes the CROUS scholarship during their first year, a supplementary support which is unique amongst French higher education institutions. 

Over 30 scholarships and financial aid opportunities exist for non-European students too, particularly the Emile Boutmy scholarship, named after the university’s founder. Awarded according to both academic and social criteria, there were 281 Boutmy scholars in 2017-2018. Boutmy scholarships can amount to 19,000 euros a year. Other programmes are also available, such as the Mastercard Foundation Scholars Programme, specifically designed to aid gifted African students. 

Finally, many Sciences Po students benefit from public or private scholarship programmes. 

On the whole, Sciences Po helps nearly 4 in 10 students: 36% of students are exempt (totally or partially) from paying tuition fees or receive financial aid. 

Mobiliy Grants for the Year Abroad

At Sciences Po, a mandatory part of the degree is the 3rd year abroad. This is an unforgettable experience for students but not everybody has the financial means to cover living costs in a foreign country. In order for all students to choose the country of their choice, our mobility grants provide students with financial difficulties the means to pay for the extra costs of a year abroad, or, to make the necessary arrangements in the case of a handicap.

Emergency hardship: tailor-made support

Beyond these financial aid initiatives, Sciences Po’s welfare services are available to support all students so that daily living costs, administrative costs, or any unforeseen challenges they may face do not add excess pressure on their studies. 

  • The housing service collects adverts and postings, supports students in their search for accommodation whilst proposing housing options in student residences, and can also provide financial aid.
  • To help overcome unforeseen financial difficulties or a delayed loan payment, our student welfare and support service adapts to each individual case, even giving out emergency help. 
  • We also provide help for non-European students with administrative procedures involved in obtaining visas and residence permits or renewing them.
  • Finally, to help students make ends meet, we offer more than 600 student jobs each year. 

And for concerns that are not uniquely financial, our Health Centre is available to provide further support.

Source: Financial aid policy and student services, admissions report 2017-2018 

A Back-To-School Programme Centred Around Ecology

Discover the programme
  • Students listening to inaugural lecture in amphitheatre @Judith AzemaStudents listening to inaugural lecture in amphitheatre @Judith Azema

On your marks, get set… the start of the new academic year is upon us! Some students will be taking their first steps at Sciences Po as freshmen, others will be returning to familiar ground. Like every year, a back-to-school ceremony is held on each Undergraduate College campus and for each of the seven graduate schools. This year, the central theme of these ceremonies is the future of our planet. See details below.

The beginning of each new academic year is a formal occasion which celebrates the values and ambition of Sciences Po's educational programme. This is highlighted by the inaugural lectures given by a special guest of honour. It is often the first time that new students meet our director, Frédéric Mion, and the pedagogical teams that will monitor their progress throughout the year.

Discover the programme.

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Highlights of the 2019 Graduation Ceremonies

An Exceptional Diversity of Talent
  • Graduate receiving her diploma 2019 ©Corinne HauryGraduate receiving her diploma 2019 ©Corinne Haury

Over 7,300 people attended the four graduation ceremonies of the Class of 2019 on June 28 & 29, 2019. Graduates walked under the proud gaze of their parents, friends, teachers, companions, and sometimes children to receive their diploma. Relive these unforgettable moments in video.

For the first time, the Sciences Po graduation ceremonies were held in the great hall Pierre Boulez of the Philharmonie, the newest concert hall in Paris designed by renowned architect Jean Nouvel. Over two days, the ceremonies filled the room with intense pride and joy. On stage, at the microphone, in the room, the singularity of the Sciences Po experience was expressed with fervor. The exceptional diversity of the student community was shown off proudly, from shimmering saris to kilts to military uniforms; talents from all walks of life walked across the stage, smiles on their faces and diplomas in hand.

An Exceptional Diversity of Talent

Our student speakers shared their vision on what brought their talent together, beyond the diversity of their origins, their choice of Master's, and their projects. Graduates of honour, grateful and free-spirited, embody the qualities that Sciences Po strives to place in the forefront: Fatoumata Diallo's commitment, Marie Geoffreoy's duty of impertinence, Anne-Sophie Travert's open-mindedness, but also Mas Mahmud's resilience.

A Diploma and a Responsibility

For the guests of honour, the diploma received is a passport, but also a responsibility. Journalist Gilles Bouleau urged graduates to "reach out beyond themselves." Jacques Toubon, human rights defender, pushed the urgency to think about "the absolute right of dignity." For Entrepreneur Emmanuelle Duez, graduation plants the seed of the energy to create, for Mary Robinson, first woman president of Ireland, the categorical imperative to act against the climate crisis.

Graduates were told to use their diploma to make an impact, but without forgetting to "love with passion", in the words of President Frédéric Mion. The deans of the seven Sciences Po graduate schools also delivered a powerful message: rewatch the speeches of Pierre François of the Doctoral School, Patrick Le Galès of the Urban School, Bruno Patino of the School of Journalism, Christophe Jamin of the Law School, Marie-Laure Djelic of the School of Management and Innovation, Yann Algan of the School of Public Affairs and Enrico Letta of the School of International Affairs.

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The Summer Reading List is Here!

Use the hashtag #ScPoSummerReading on social networks to discover more recommendations
  • Open book on a beach ©MaleWitch/ShutterstockOpen book on a beach ©MaleWitch/Shutterstock

Summer is here, and so is our 2019 Summer Reading List! We asked our community to give us their reading recommendations using #ScPoSummerReading, and here is our final selection of 10 summer must-reads!

Use the hashtag #ScPoSummerReading on social networks to discover more recommendations, and don’t hesitate to share your reading wherever you may be spending your summer!

Educated by Tara Westover // 2018

Educated by Tara Westover

Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches. A true autodidact for whom learning and education was just the start of her journey. She went on to study at Harvard and Cambridge. Educated is an account of the struggle for self-invention. It is a tale of fierce family loyalty and of the grief that comes with severing the closest of ties.

Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami // 2006

kafka on the shore by haruki murakami

Kafka on the Shore, a tour de force of metaphysical reality, is powered by two remarkable characters: a teenage boy, Kafka Tamura, who runs away from home either to escape a gruesome oedipal prophecy or to search for his long-missing mother and sister; and an aging simpleton called Nakata, who never recovered from a wartime affliction and now is drawn toward Kafka for reasons that, like the most basic activities of daily life, he cannot fathom. Their odyssey, as mysterious to them as it is to us, is enriched throughout by vivid accomplices and mesmerising events.

Jog On by Bella Mackie // 2018

Jog On - Bella Mackie

In Jog On, Bella explains with hilarious and unfiltered honesty how she used running to battle crippling anxiety and depression, without having to sacrifice her main loves: alcohol, cigarettes, and ice cream. With the help of a supporting cast of doctors, psychologists, sportspeople and friends, she shares a wealth of inspirational stories, research and tips that show how exercise often can be the best medicine. This funny, moving and motivational book will encourage you to say ‘jog on’ to your problems and get your life back on track – no matter how small those first steps may be.

The Shape Of The Ruins by Juan Gabriel Vasquez // 2015

The Shape Of The Ruins - Juan Gabriel Vasquez

The Shape of the Ruins is a masterly story of conspiracy, political obsession, and literary investigation. When a man is arrested at a museum for attempting to steal the bullet-ridden suit of a murdered Colombian politician, few notice. But soon this thwarted theft takes on greater meaning as it becomes a thread in a widening web of popular fixations with conspiracy theories, assassinations, and historical secrets; and it haunts those who feel that only they know the real truth behind these killings.  This novel explores the darkest moments of a country’s past and brings to life the ways in which past violence shapes our present lives. 

 

The Long Song by Andrea Levy // 2011

The Long Song - Andrea Levy

The Long Song is written as a memoir by an elderly Jamaican woman living in early 19th-century Jamaica during the final years of slavery and the transition to freedom that took place thereafter. It tells the tale of a young slave girl, July, who lives at Amity – a a sugarcane plantation. She lived through the 1831 Baptist War, and then the beginning of freedom.

Machines Like Me by Ian McEwan // 2019

Machines Like Me - Ian McEwan

"The present is the frailest of improbable constructs. It could have been different.” Machines Like Me takes place in an alternative 1980s London. Political events and the lives of great historical personalities are reversed - notably for Margaret Thatcher, JFK, John Lennon, and Alan Turing, who steers British society into a new technological age with his invention of near-human androids. Charlie a bright student who lives with a terrible secret, comes into money, he buys Adam, one of the first synthetic humans and—with Miranda's help—he designs Adam's personality. The near-perfect human that emerges is beautiful, strong, and clever. It isn't long before a love triangle soon forms, and these three beings confront a profound moral dilemma. 

The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars by Michael Mann // 2012

The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars -Michael Mann

A book about climate change by the American climatologist and geophysicist Michael E. Mann. In the book Mann describes how he became a researcher investigating the temperature record of the past 1000 years and was lead author, with Raymond S. Bradley and Malcolm K. Hughes, on the 1999 reconstruction that was the first to be dubbed the hockey stick graph. He concisely explains the basics of climate science including statistical methodology dealing with paleoclimate proxy data, and examines the tactics which opponents of action on climate change use to distort the science and attack the reputations of climate scientists. The book describes both the hockey stick controversy and the broader context of skepticism in science and contrarians rejecting evidence of human influence on climate.

The Perfect Nanny by Leila Slimani // 2018

The Perfect Nanny: A Novel - Leila Slimani

When Myriam, a French-Moroccan lawyer, decides to return to work after having children, she and her husband look for the perfect nanny for their two young children. They never dreamed they would find Louise: a quiet, polite, devoted woman who sings to the children, cleans the family’s chic apartment in Paris’s upscale tenth arrondissement, stays late without complaint, and hosts enviable kiddie parties. But as the couple and the nanny become more dependent on one another, jealousy, resentment, and suspicions mount, shattering the idyllic tableau. Building tension with every page, The Perfect Nanny is a compulsive, riveting, bravely observed exploration of power, class, race, domesticity, and motherhood—and the American debut of an immensely talented writer.

A Woman is No Man by Etaf Rum // 2019

A Woman is No Man - Etaf Rum

In Brooklyn, eighteen-year-old Deya is starting to meet with suitors. Though she doesn’t want to get married, her grandparents give her no choice. History is repeating itself: Deya’s mother, Isra, also had no choice when she left Palestine as a teenager to marry Adam. Though Deya was raised to believe her parents died in a car accident, a secret note from a mysterious, yet familiar-looking woman makes Deya question everything she was told about her past. As the narrative alternates between the lives of Deya and Isra, she begins to understand the dark, complex secrets behind her fragile community.

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion // 2013

The Rosie Project - Graeme Simsion

Don Tillman, professor of genetics, has never been on a second date. He is a man who can count all his friends on the fingers of one hand, whose lifelong difficulty with social rituals has convinced him that he is simply not wired for romance. So when an acquaintance informs him that he would make a “wonderful” husband, his first reaction is shock. Yet he must concede to the statistical probability that there is someone for everyone, and he embarks upon The Wife Project. In the orderly, evidence-based manner with which he approaches all things, Don sets out to find the perfect partner. She will be punctual and logical—most definitely not a barmaid, a smoker, a drinker, or a late-arriver.

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