The peculiarities of the "future industry"

Ariel Colonomos, a CNRS research professor at CERI Sciences Po, has just been awarded the 2017 International Studies Association (ISA) Ethics Book Award for his book Selling the Future: The Perils of Predicting Global Politics. In this book, Ariel Colonomos investigates the paradoxes of forecasting and future-telling, and explores today’s knowledge factories to reveal how our futures are shaped by social scientists, think-tanks and rating agencies. Interview.

Is the future something that can be sold and bought on a market? How can a price be put on the future? Does the rule of supply and demand apply?

Ariel Colonomos: The future is an idea about a forthcoming state of affairs. In order to make this idea heard, you need to enter a public space where many other future tellers gather. You then have to have people listen to your claims. My book focuses on those who make claims about political or financial futures. In some cases, future claims are just a work of expertise that you need to pay for, as in the case of rating agencies. Think tank experts are paid as well, based on the funding that they receive which depends upon their reputation. So money does play a role.

However, the “marketplace of ideas” is metaphorical. My book explores the relation between those who supply ideas about the future and those who demand their expertise, including policymakers, the media, and the general public. The marketplace of ideas is the space where this supply and demand meet.

What is specific about this metaphorical market?

Ariel Colonomos: This game of supply and demand does indeed have its peculiarities. Although most Western societies are “knowledge societies,” there is little diversity when it comes to the “future industry”; future claims converge on focal points and strong consensuses prevail about which futures deserve to be studied and which answers should be provided.

Policymakers or journalists to whom these claims are addressed are aware of the limitations of predictions or forecasts but never sanction those they find to be of unsatisfactory quality. Why? Vague future claims give policymakers significant leeway when they have to make decisions. If future claims were considered trustworthy and accurate, it would put some constraints on political institutions.

You devote a chapter in your book to credit rating agencies, as they influence future behaviour in financial markets and temper their own predictions...

Ariel Colonomos: Rating agencies are one of the few market-based organisations whose purpose is explicitly to provide “opinions about the future” (this is how Standard & Poors defines its ratings). There are several reasons why this is an interesting and important phenomenon. Rating agencies are important actors in the financial and economic worlds. We hear a lot from them in the public space, as ratings are widely publicised especially in the case of sovereign ratings (ratings about the creditworthiness of states). These ratings can also have an impact on state diplomacy, as state leaders usually make public comments and try to justify themselves when rating agencies have downgraded their country.

The book takes a critical stance towards the US think tank establishment and Washington more generally...

Ariel Colonomos: DC is a very important example. Worldwide, Washington has the highest degree of political expertise concentrated in what is a relatively small city, due, of course, to the fact that the US is the leading power and that such expertise is also heard beyond US borders. The professionals who make claims about the future are what I call “oracles’ networks” based, as a first historical example, on the oracles that led Oedipus to killing his father and eventually to his own tragic fate. As in the myth of Oedipus, a series of indicators that are provided by future tellers constantly orient our trajectories in one way or the other (even as we have some degree of control over them). Professional future tellers are also interconnected and part of a same social world. In DC, think-tankers know each other well, and they know each other’s institutions. Rating agencies include other indexes in their own calculations and the sovereign ratings they produce are part of other risk indexes that are being produced by other companies.

All in all, do futurists provide us with more certainty or uncertainty about the future?

Ariel Colonomos: We have an interesting paradox here. The expansion of the global marketplace of ideas about the future is driven by the perception that we live in a world where risk, and therefore uncertainty, prevail. It doesn’t matter whether this perception is true or false. What matters is that there is a demand for predictions and forecasts, so that this information might improve the quality of our decision-making. This is an illusion because the quality of future claims is very low and the informational value of predictions and forecasts, as it is acknowledged in most cases by those who frame them and those to whom they are addressed, is extremely limited.

Is this because it is not possible to have a better understanding of the future (i.e., there are radical limits to our knowledge of the future)? I argue that this is not the case, and therein lies the paradox. I have shown in my book that those who participate in the supply and demand market for the future acquiesce to this state of affairs. This would mean that we don’t really want to know more than what we already know (very little). To some extent, then, futurists reproduce the very uncertainty that was the initial reason for which they were brought into play. To answer your question, futurists’ ‘raison d’être’ is uncertainty and, with the consent of those who surround them and have asked them for advice, they perpetuate it. In doing so, they also perpetuate the role they have been assigned to. In one sense this is reassuring, as it means we can keep a high degree of control over our lives. This would not be the case if we knew the future as our choices would be predetermined.

Ariel Colonomos was interviewed by Jason Nagel and Miriam Perier

Related link

Les sciences sociales au prisme du genre

Les sciences sociales au prisme du genre

PRESAGE, le Programme de recherche et d’enseignement des savoirs sur le genre de Sciences Po, a été créé en 2010. Destiné à promouvoir la recherche sur le genre, à développer l’offre de cours et à diffuser les savoirs sur ce champ, c’est l’un des plus anciens programmes transversal et pluridisciplinaire dédié au genre en France. Rencontre avec ses fondatrices, Hélène Périvier et Françoise Milewski, chercheuses à l'Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques.

Lire la suite
Ne jetez plus vos couverts, mangez-les !

Ne jetez plus vos couverts, mangez-les !

Écologiste convaincue et diplômée de Sciences Po en 2015, Tiphaine Guerout a mis ambition entrepreneuriale au service de la cause environnementale. Elle a fondé Koovee, une start-up qui propose une alternative aux couverts jetables en plastique : des cuillères et fourchettes en biscuit, fabriqués en France, qui ont la particularité d’être suffisamment résistants pour que l’on puisse manger avec. Rencontre avec une jeune diplômée qui ambitionne d’inonder les marchés français et européens dans les prochaines années.

Lire la suite
La France est-elle vraiment une

La France est-elle vraiment une "startup nation" ?

Spécialiste de l’histoire politique des États-Unis, Denis Lacorne enquête dans son ouvrage Tous Milliardaires !, paru chez Fayard en novembre 2019, sur le mythe de la "startup nation". L'ambition de la France à figurer parmi les nations capables de produire des géants du numérique est-elle une réalité ?

Lire la suite
Patrick Chamoiseau, nouvel écrivain en résidence

Patrick Chamoiseau, nouvel écrivain en résidence

Après Kamel Daoud et Marie Darrieussecq, Patrick Chamoiseau est le nouveau titulaire de la chaire d’écrivain en résidence de Sciences Po. Lauréat du Prix Goncourt 1992, primé à maintes reprises, Patrick Chamoiseau est auteur de romans, contes, essais, scénarios. À partir de janvier 2020, il donnera cours aux étudiants de Sciences Po.

Lire la suite
Et si vous étudiiez à Sciences Po cet été ?

Et si vous étudiiez à Sciences Po cet été ?

Vous êtes lycéen ou étudiant ? Vous souhaitez étudier les sciences humaines et sociales à Sciences Po le temps d'un été ? Les candidatures pour l’édition 2020 de la Summer School sont ouvertes, avec deux programmes distincts, l'un pour les étudiants, l'autre pour les lycéens. Voici ce qu’il faut savoir avant de déposer sa candidature.

Lire la suite

"On peut sortir de la croissance sans sortir du capitalisme"

Économiste engagé pour une société visant le bien-être, Éloi Laurent démontre dans son dernier ouvrage, Sortir de la croissance, mode d’emploi, pourquoi la crise écologique ne pourra être résolue sans abandonner l’objectif de croissance. Utopiste ? Non, d’après lui, il s’agit au contraire d’un objectif non seulement humaniste mais aussi tout à fait réaliste. Preuves à l’appui.

Lire la suite
Vêtements durables, mode d'emploi

Vêtements durables, mode d'emploi

Étudiante en master Innovation & transformation numérique, Camille Gréco a rejoint l'École du management de Sciences Po après des études de mode à Londres. Passionnée par le secteur de la mode et du textile, mais soucieuse de le rendre plus durable et moins polluant, elle crée en 2017 CrushON, une plateforme en ligne qui rassemble l’offre de friperies. L'objectif : démocratiser l’achat de vêtements vintages, dans une optique de consommation écoresponsable. Explications.

Lire la suite

“CO2 ou PIB, il faut choisir”

“CO2 ou PIB, il faut choisir”

Précis, véhément et volontiers iconoclaste, l'ingénieur et spécialiste du climat Jean-Marc Jancovici a délivré aux étudiants de deuxième année une leçon en forme de démonstration sur l’inéluctable fin de l’âge d’or énergétique. En la matière, point de compromis possible : décarboner l’économie, c’est aussi en finir avec la course éperdue à la croissance. Retour sur les points-clés d’une démonstration salutaire, à revoir en intégralité.

Lire la suite
Jacques Chirac, un

Jacques Chirac, un "étudiant d'avenir'

“Contre toute attente, je me plais très vite à Sciences Po”, raconte Jacques Chirac dans ses Mémoires. Soigneusement conservé dans les archives de Sciences Po, son dossier étudiant retrace la trajectoire de comète d’un jeune homme pressé que ni l’envie, ni son milieu ne prédisposait à aborder ce “nouveau monde”. Contre toute attente, ce n’est pas la passion pour la politique que l'ancien président de la République découvre et explore rue Saint-Guillaume, mais celle de “l’aventure”. Plongée dans le dossier d'un de nos plus illustres alumni disparu le 26 septembre 2019.

Lire la suite
Fariba Adelkhah a entamé une grève de la faim

Fariba Adelkhah a entamé une grève de la faim

26 décembre 2019 - En cette période de fêtes de fin d’année, notre collègue et amie Fariba Adelkhah, injustement emprisonnée en Iran depuis plus de six mois, a débuté une grève de la faim illimitée. Cette grave nouvelle nous bouleverse profondément et porte à son comble l’inquiétude que nous éprouvons devant le sort terrible imposé à nos collègues.

Lire la suite