Justice in Civil War Contexts

Adam Baczko conducts research on the formation of legal institutions by armed movements and international actors in contexts of armed conflict, with a particular focus on Afghanistan and Syria. Adam joined CERI as CNRS researcher in September 2019.

Interview conducted by Corinne Deloy and translated into English by Miriam Perier and Caitlin Gordon Walker (CERI).

You joined CERI in September 2019. What is your academic background?

After a double BA in War Studies and History at King’s College London, I did my Master’s and my PhD in social sciences (with a major in Political Science) at the EHESS (Ecole des Hautes études en Sciences Sociales) in Paris. My PhD was entitled Laws at War: Justice, Domination and Violence in Afghanistan (2001-2018) and was co-supervised by Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau and Gilles Dorronsoro. In September 2014, I was invited to join a programme called Order, Conflict and Violence, directed by Stathis Kalyvas at Yale University. In 2015 I spent one semester at the Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen (IWM), Vienna. The next year I received the Trajectories of Change Fellowship from the Zeit-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius, a German foundation funding a programme on the transformations of states and contemporary societies. Until I arrived at CERI this autumn, I was also a member of the research team of the ERC called “Social Dynamics of Civil Wars” directed by Gilles Dorronsoro at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.

What are your current research themes?

I work on justice in civil war contexts, in particular in Afghanistan, Syria, and, in my forthcoming research, Mali. I question the sociological approaches to the state and to law by conceptualising civil wars not as lawless situations but as a struggle between competing legal systems. I examine how the different parties at war work at having the decisions of their judges recognised as judicial documents in a context in which doing justice is inseparably a political act, a tool for social control, and an issue at stake in the war.

I am currently finishing a book drawing from my PhD. Based on twelve months of fieldwork in Afghanistan stretched between 2010 and 2016, I analyse the social and political implications of the formation of a juridical system by the Taliban insurgency. I show that the Taliban have established their own courts in a context of radical juridical uncertainty caused by decades of civil war and nourished by the western military intervention launched in 2001. In order to ensure their judges’ impartiality, the insurgency integrates them in an institutional system and tries to frame their practices in rudimentary procedures of objectivisation. While being caught in war, this juridical system allows the armed movement to solve certain private disputes and thereby to legitimate its territorial grip and apply its political programme.

I have also analysed the trajectory of the Syrian civil war, with a specific focus and interest on the formation of legal institutions by various belligerents between 2011 and 2015-16. This research, which I did with Gilles Dorronsoro and Arthur Quesnay produced the book entitled Syrie. Anatomie d’une guerre civile (CNRS Éditions, 2016).

I am currently starting new research on the legal production of foreign actors during international interventions, through the case of Mali in particular. I am interested in studying how expertise circulates and how programmes are applied, in terms both of the official legal system and of more informal projects of dispute settlement. The case of Mali is of particular interest because the programmes linked to law and justice share many features with those I have observed in Afghanistan in the 2010s. The differences I have observed between the two countries are equally interesting because they determine what is at stake during the various western military interventions since the end of the Cold War.

Why have you chosen to work on justice and armed groups? Where does your interest for such themes come from?

I started being interested in armed groups during my BA in War Studies. In the context of post-9/11 military interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan I wanted to better understand the social rooting of insurgencies resisting the American army. I felt that the usual European and American descriptions of these armed groups were too simplistic and that they did not allow a good understanding of these movements’ growing settlement in these two countries, despite the technological superiority of the American military. I started traveling to Iraq in 2009, and then to Afghanistan in order to better understand the social and political dynamics underlying these armed conflicts.

My interest for legal issues comes from my first conversations with Afghans living in the countryside and whose daily lives were marked by war. While I was asking questions about the insurgency, they were way more talkative on private disputes they were part of, in particular those related to land, and which role seemed crucial in the population’s assessment of the different parties at war. During one of my fieldwork visits in 2011, two opponents to the Taliban explained to me that they preferred to make use of the insurgency’s judges rather than the regime’s. Then they started to praise the insurgency’s judicial institutions yet they had started the conversation by fiercely criticising the armed movement. I understood that something major was going on and I decided to examine the Taliban courts.

And when I started wanting to explain why such an armed movement invested in law, in a comparative perspective, I realised that was the case everywhere, with the LTTE in Sri Lanka, FARC in Colombia, post-2011 insurgency and PYD in Syria. These legal systems are generally mentioned too succinctly and their social effects are underestimated. In each conflict I have observed, behind the military confrontation there is a juridical struggle for recognition as the legal, official authority, the one capable to state the law and therefore to define which social practices are authorised and which ones are forbidden.

What collective projects do you contribute to here at CERI and elsewhere?

I am not yet part of a collective project here at CERI but I would very much like to contribute to organise one around the legal issues in relation to armed conflicts, terrorism, all the issues that deal with the interweaving of national and international jurisdictions. Additionally, I have recently become part of the editorial board of Critique internationale, a journal that defends the comparative approach to social sciences, something I consider crucial today.

As I mentioned earlier, I am a member of the ERC’s “Social Dynamics of Civil Wars”, a project coordinated by Gilles Dorronsoro from the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne until the end of the project, next year. The project gathers about fifteen researchers specialising in civil wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Mali, South Sudan, Ivory Coast, and Ukraine. This research group analyses comparatively contemporary civil wars in a sociological perspective, which constitutes a rupture from the mainstream approach that examines armed conflict from an ad hoc perspective, as if the central concepts of social sciences, socialisation, institutionalisation, or domination were no longer relevant as soon as men take up arms. On the contrary, we consider that the social sciences’ theoretical tools help us better understand the underlying social dynamics of conflict, which an exclusive focalisation on armed violence hides. In return, this perspective helps us to rethink some of our concepts that are too often characterised by biases caused by the concentration of most sociological and political work on European and North American societies.

Related links:

"Un cours comme un point d'interrogation"

Quoi de plus iconique qu’un cours sur “l’abécédaire du politique” à Sciences Po ? Un grand classique, certes, mais qui n’exclut pas l’originalité. En convoquant théorie politique, philosophie, littérature, et anthropologie, Astrid Von Busekist questionne le champ du politique et mène les étudiants vers une réflexion “un peu ordonnée” avec un seul credo : penser, c’est argumenter. 

Lire la suite
L’armée algérienne à l’épreuve du mouvement citoyen du Hirak

L’armée algérienne à l’épreuve du mouvement citoyen du Hirak

Par Luis Martinez (CERI) - Aux yeux de l’armée, le mouvement dit Hirak, qui balaie l’Algérie depuis maintenant près d’un an, exprime avant tout la colère du peuple à l’encontre du système Bouteflika – un système caractérisé par la présence au gouvernement de nombreux civils, souvent accusés de corruption. La réponse politique des militaires, qui tiennent les rênes du pays depuis la démission de Bouteflika en avril 2019, a donc été de mettre en place un gouvernement de technocrates présentés comme compétents et intègres. L’armée ne souhaite pas démocratiser le régime, mais seulement améliorer la gouvernance afin de pouvoir répondre aux besoins socio-économiques de la population.

Lire la suite
5 conseils avant les écrits

5 conseils avant les écrits

Samedi 22 et dimanche 23 février prochains, vous serez des milliers de candidats à plancher sur les épreuves écrites pour l’entrée en 1ère année à Sciences Po. C’est le moment d’avoir confiance en soi : voici quelques rappels utiles pour arriver sereins. 

Lire la suite
Fabrice Amedeo, de Sciences Po au grand large

Fabrice Amedeo, de Sciences Po au grand large

Diplômé de Sciences Po en 2002, Fabrice Amedeo a déjà plusieurs vies. Journaliste, auteur, et désormais navigateur au long cours, ce quarantenaire s'apprête à prendre le départ du Vendée Globe 2020 à la barre d'un monocoque doté de capteurs ultra-sophistiqués qui lui permettent d'allier passion pour la voile et protection de l'environnement. Portrait en vidéo.

Lire la suite
Transition écologique : Sciences Po lance un programme d’action à 3 ans

Transition écologique : Sciences Po lance un programme d’action à 3 ans

Face à l’urgence climatique et aux bouleversements environnementaux planétaires, Sciences Po se donne une feuille de route sur trois ans dans le cadre de l’initiative globale « Climate Action : Make it work » lancée en 2015. Elle engage l’institution à la fois en tant que lieu de formation et de savoir, et en tant que lieu d’études et de travail, à Paris et sur ses six campus en région.  

Lire la suite
Admissions 2019 : nouveau record de candidatures

Admissions 2019 : nouveau record de candidatures

Le dernier bilan des admissions confirme l’attractivité de Sciences Po avec plus de 20 000 candidatures en 2019. 4218 nouveaux étudiants issus de 137 pays ont rejoint nos cursus de premier cycle, de master et de doctorat. Les effectifs totaux de Sciences Po restent stables, et la sélectivité est en hausse avec un taux d’admis de l’ordre de 20%. 

Lire la suite
Solidarité avec nos chercheurs captifs en Iran

Solidarité avec nos chercheurs captifs en Iran

Fariba Adelkhah et Roland Marchal, tous deux chercheurs au Centre de recherches internationales de Sciences Po (CERI), ont été arrêtés en Iran au début du mois de juin 2019. Depuis lors, ils sont toujours incarcérés. Le 31 janvier 2020, le CERI organisait un colloque, « Captifs sans motif », visant à contribuer à la mobilisation en faveur de leur libération et à sensibiliser aux divers enjeux (diplomatiques, politiques, intellectuels et humains) que soulève leur détention. De nombreux chercheurs, mais aussi des personnalités familières de la question des arrestations arbitraires, étaient présents. Retour en vidéo sur leurs échanges.

Lire la suite
Hommage à David Kessler, enseignant et compagnon de route de Sciences Po

Hommage à David Kessler, enseignant et compagnon de route de Sciences Po

Disparu le 3 février 2020, David Kessler, intellectuel, haut fonctionnaire, conseiller politique et acteur majeur du secteur culturel en France, a enseigné à Sciences Po durant une trentaine d’années. Avec lui, Sciences Po perd un enseignant de talent et un compagnon de route très fidèle, attentif et bienveillant, qui a soutenu l’institution dans toutes les grandes transformations qui ont marqué les dernières décennies. 

Lire la suite
Amérindiens, leur combat pour la planète

Amérindiens, leur combat pour la planète

Les peuples amérindiens qui vivent en dehors de la mondialisation industrielle représentent près de 400 millions de personnes dans le monde. Ils constituent une part significative de la population de certains pays et régions et leur survie n'est pas seulement un enjeu à l'échelle de leurs peuples. "Nous avons besoin de ces populations pour préserver les 4/5e de la diversité biologique qui se trouvent concentrés sur leurs terres", souligne ainsi Sébastien Treyer, directeur général de l'Iddri. Ce 29 janvier, Davi Kopenawa, chaman et porte-parole des Indiens Yanomami du Brésil et Almir Narayamoga Surui, leader des Paiter Surui du Brésil, sont venus débattre à Sciences Po de leur combat.

Lire la suite
Après le Brexit, une Europe des 27 plus unie ?

Après le Brexit, une Europe des 27 plus unie ?

Par Christian Lequesne et Thierry Chopin. Le Brexit n’est pas une bonne nouvelle pour l’Union européenne : il représente une amputation, en termes de poids commercial, politique et stratégique. Il rend aussi plus difficile le discours normatif sur le modèle européen de régionalisme dans le monde. Au Brésil, en Inde ou en Afrique du Sud, le modèle apparaît comme une entreprise qui se délite. Par ailleurs, le Brexit acte la possibilité d’une véritable réversibilité politique, si bien que certains ont même parlé d’une désintégration de l’Union européenne. Malgré cela, du point de vue des gouvernements nationaux, il est remarquable que les 27 autres États membres aient présenté dans les négociations un « front uni » face aux divisions britanniques.

Lire la suite