Joseph Stiglitz: Economics against Inequalities

Closely associated with our university for many years, Joseph Stiglitz, recipient of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics, is spending the Autumn 2019 semester at Sciences Po, sharing the results of his work with students and fellow researchers. In this video, he reflects upon the motivations of his career, his past influences and his convictions for better policy making.

In recognition of his work and his strong links to Sciences Po, Joseph Stiglitz will be awarded the title of Doctor Honoris Causa, along with sociologist Vivianne Zelizer, during a ceremony on Wednesday, 13 November 2019. 

>> Attend the ceremony of honour by registering here (FR)

He spoke at a conference on 4 November titled 'Measuring what counts for economic and social performance'. Watch a replay of the debate below. 

Attend his upcoming conference:

About Joseph Stiglitz:

Born in 1943, Joseph Eugene Stiglitz is an American neo-Keynesian economist. Recipient of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics, he is one of the founders of the neo-Keynesian movement. Between 1960-63, he studied at Amherst College, before obtaining his Master's and PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He spent four years at Cambridge University as well, arriving as a Fulbright Scholar. He has had an extensive academic career, teaching at prestigious universities such as Yale, Stanford, Princeton and Oxford, and is currently at Columbia University in several capacities. He has also been politically active, having been the President of the Council of Economic Advisors in the Clinton Administration, Chief Economist at the World Bank and an advisor to the Obama Administration as well as the UK's Labour Party. In 2001, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics, along with George Akerlof and Michael Spence, for contributions to market analyses in situations of asymmetric information. His most notable works include Globalization and Its Discontents (W.W. Norton, 2002), The Roaring Nineties: A New History of the World's Most Prosperous Decade (W.W. Norton, 2003), Making Globalization Work (W.W. Norton, 2006) and The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future (W.W. Norton, 2012).

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