Astrid LAVILLE, Class of 2021

Public Relations Officer at the Paris Peace Forum
  • Astrid Laville, Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (2021)Astrid Laville, Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (2021)

Graduated from the Master in Policital Science, Programme in International Relations

Can you tell us about your academic background?

After obtaining my baccalaureate in 2016, I enrolled in “B/L” (Literature and Social Sciences) preparatory classes in Lille. Over a two-year period, I was able to develop my knowledge of history, sociology, and economics, while pursuing my interest in philosophy, literature, and languages. Those two years were probably the richest of my university career, when I felt I discovered and learned the most. However, I have always been attracted to international relations, and I chose to study political science at Panthéon Sorbonne University.

From the first semester of the third year of my degree, I knew I had made the right choice! I took courses on the workings of the European Union and on the history of the international system. The latter course absolutely fascinated me, especially as it informed me about the main currents of opinion in international relations. My interest in theory led me to apply for the Master’s in Political Science, specialising in International Relations, at the School of Research. Although I did not yet have a fully defined career plan, I knew that I wanted to discover the world of research.

What did your years of study at the Sciences Po School of Research (formerly the Doctoral School) bring you?

This answer may seem a bit obvious, but first and foremost I learned how to conduct research, i.e. how to build a project, how to choose and implement research methods, and how to draw conclusions by analysing the results. The School of Research teaches students to combine curiosity and caution: conducting rigorous research implies looking beyond one’s preconceived ideas, questioning one's own biases, accepting criticism and self-questioning.

Research training enables students to specialise in their chosen subject while keeping an open mind, because of the diversity of the courses. It also sharpened my critical thinking skills.

Which teacher or teaching has had the greatest impact on you?

Without hesitation: Frédéric Ramel, my thesis supervisor. First of all, he’s an excellent teacher who knows how to make his classes exciting. Secondly, he was very approachable, and we regularly discussed the progress of my work. He advised me on methodology, and encouraged me to learn about certain concepts or to read certain books. I particularly remember discovering through him the work of Baptiste Morizot, a specialist in the philosophy of living beings. This was not at all related to my subject, which was diplomacy. However, one of his books completely fascinated me and I used it to contribute to my thought process. That was his influence on me: he pushed students to cut across disciplines and perspectives to produce original thinking.

What is your current role?

After officially completing my Master's degree, I did an internship at the Paris Peace Forum as a Public and Diplomatic Relations Assistant. I was involved in managing relations between the Forum’s Permanent Secretariat and the embassies and official events in Paris, with the aim of negotiating and organising the participation of heads of state, government and international organisations in the Forum’s annual event. I now hold the position of Public Relations Officer.

How has your education contributed to the position you hold today?

The position I hold today is directly related to my research topic. In fact, I had chosen to specialise in summit diplomacy, and the Paris Peace Forum was one of my case studies. I conducted two interviews with members of the Forum Secretariat in the winter of 2021. The knowledge I gained about foreign policy and the summit meetings organised by France was useful in helping me adapt quickly to the workings of the Forum Secretariat.

What advice would you give to a student wanting to go into your current field?

Firstly, choose your research topic carefully: it allows you to network with professionals or specialists in the field you are interested in, or even to do an internship. Don't hesitate to ask your teachers for help with this - they are usually very amenable to helping you. Secondly, seize every opportunity that comes your way: involvement in an association, writing articles, internships during the summer when possible. This will allow you to meet people from a variety of backgrounds and learn new skills. Finally, persevere, especially in these times of Covid-19! Everyone’s pathway is unique, and there are many ways of getting a foot in the door.

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=> See all the Graduates' Portraits

[ February 2022 ]

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COGITO - Research Magazine n°17

  • CogitoCogito

This issue showcases history: that of the fate of airmen who fell from the sky during World War II, of criticism of a civil service considered excessive, of the creation of a census in Spain, and of the operation of the French and American states.

States are also discussed in their contemporaneity: the protection of their constitutions, the remuneration of care workers, the alignment of anti-corruption campaigns, and the integration of gender issues in international climate policies.

The environment is also covered in an analysis of its close link with modern political theories. Finally, we delve into the resistance of the French media to populist drifts and present innovative research on the fragility of supply chains.

Enjoy the read!

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CIVICA Research Excellence Tour

Governance for transformative change: Lessons from the EU’s sustainability transition 23 May 2022, from 10:30am-12pm (CET) at Sciences Po.
  • CIVICA Research CIVICA Research

This seminar, hosted by Sciences Po, is the first to take place under the CIVICA Research Excellence Tour series.

Speaker Jerneja Penca will discuss her research on the relationship between transformative change and governance, drawing on examples from the EU's efforts in furthering governance for and through biodiversity.

Jerneja Penca is a scholar in environmental governance at the Euro-Mediterranean University (EMUNI), where she serves also as the Head of academic affairs. Her research in the area of environmental governance and sustainable development has spanned over various regimes, including biodiversity, climate change, fisheries and plastics pollution. She has published in international legal and interdisciplinary journals, including Marine policy, Fish and fisheries, Transnational environmental law, Review of European, comparative & international environmental law, Legal studies, International Journal of marine and coastal law, and Governance: An international journal of policy and administration. Her interest lies particularly in how social paradigms influence law-making in the areas of resource management, environment and sustainability. 

23 May 2022 from 10:30am-12pm (CET) at Sciences Po. 

REGISTRATION

More about Jerneja Penca

Civica Research

 

 

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60 minutes with Volodymyr Zelensky

Wednesday 11 May 2022 | Live from Kyiv - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
  • 60 minutes with Volodymyr Zelensky - Live from Kyiv60 minutes with Volodymyr Zelensky - Live from Kyiv

President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine will address students of French Universities on Wednesday 11 May at 1:00 pm for an exceptional lecture.

In his first speech aimed at students, he will speak remotely from Kyiv and will then answer a few questions taken from amphitheater Boutmy.

Mathias Vicherat, President of Sciences Po, will give introductory remarks. Arancha González, Dean of Sciences Po-PSIA, will moderate the discussion.

Students are invited to attend this event on campus in the amphitheaters Boutmy and Chapsal. The event will also be broadcasted by livestream.

President Zelensky will speak in Ukrainian. A simultaneous translation will be provided in French and in English. Please note that the timing of the event is subject to change.

=> Registration compulsory

#ScPoZelensky

Crédit photo : The Presidential Office of Ukraine

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Louise BOSETTI, Class of 2008

Disarmament, Debomilization and Reintegration Officer at United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti (BINUH) | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science
  • Louise BOSETTI | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (2008)Louise BOSETTI | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (2008)

Can you tell us about your academic background? How did your interest in political science begin?

I entered Sciences Po in 2006 as a Master's student, after three years of preparatory classes at the Lycée Henri IV ("B/L" stream, i.e. literature and social sciences) and an equivalency in History obtained at Paris-Sorbonne University.

I must admit that at the time I was not very sure of my choice of Master's degree, I was coming from a programme where I’d been prepared for other universities and hadn’t been made aware of the options available to me at Sciences Po. However, having developed a taste for research during my years of preparatory classes, I decided to pursue a Master's in Comparative Politics, which incorporated elements of the Sciences Po core curriculum and specific courses from the School of Research. As for the choice of the Latin America specialisation, this was born from a lifelong interest in the region, due to my Spanish-speaking roots and my linguistic proximity to the region, and from a particularly striking context at the turn of the millennium in this part of the world. Indeed, the political and social developments that have marked the subcontinent since the turn of the 21st century particularly sharpened my interest in a region that had long aroused my curiosity.

What did your years of study at the Sciences Po School of Research (formerly the Doctoral School) bring you? What memories do you have of your school, your class, your teachers?

Without hesitation a great open-mindedness and an incredibly international outlook. I still remember my year group, which was mostly comprised of Latin American students, and it was of exceptional richness!

The flexibility of the research Master's degree also allowed me to develop my intellectual independence and discover a region that was unknown to me until then. At the time (I don't know if it is still the case today), the second year of the Master's degree was devoted to research work for the dissertation. Even though I was a little anxious in the beginning, it turned out to be a very formative and enriching experience. I ended up spending over two months in San Salvador, with another classmate, and this taught me to develop not only my research skills but also my ability to adapt in such a different and, at the time, quite volatile security context.

More than 14 years later, I am very happy to be back in this region which I discovered thanks to Sciences Po and the School of Research.

Which teacher or teaching had the greatest impact on you?

It’s difficult to choose! However, I have a very vivid memory of Bertrand Badie's lectures on what was then called “the global space”. The clarity of his arguments gave me interpretation methods that continue to enlighten me today and help me to read and understand current events and contemporary world history. At the School of Research, I was particularly marked by Yves Surel’s public policy courses; he became my thesis supervisor and supervised me during my doctoral studies, before I ended up deciding to opt for another path. Finally, the kindness of Oliver Dabène, then director of the Latin America specialisation, and his deep knowledge of the region also had a great impact on me and made my time at the Graduate School extremely formative, both academically and personally.

What is your current role?

I’m currently working with the United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti (BINUH)in Port-au-Prince, in the section that deals with Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration and Community Violence Reduction. I’ve been working with the United Nations for over 10 years, starting in 2011 as a Junior Associate Expert at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Vienna, Austria. Since then, I’ve had the opportunity to work with various United Nations entities in Japan, Colombia and, more recently, Haiti.

What were the main stages in planning your career path?

To be quite honest, my career path has been somewhat fluid and full of twists and turns, not always carefully planned!

After having first tried the academic path by registering for a PhD at the Sciences Po School of Research in 2008 straight after my Master's degree, I gradually realised that this was not my path, at least not at that time. I still felt too young to be able to fully contribute to the academic debate and I felt the need to gain professional experience outside the academic field to be able to contribute further upstream. That’s how I decided to leave the School of Research’s doctoral programme at the end of 2010. I’m mentioning this here because you don't often hear about people who decide to drop out of their PhDs and the opportunities that can also come from changing direction mid-career. It’s an important message that I want to communicate to the readers of this page! Even though, at the time, it could have been perceived as a failure (giving up my scholarship, leaving the doctoral programme), I’m convinced that it was the right decision and that it allowed me to find my way in a field in which I’ve felt really fulfilled for over 10 years!

It was then by chance, when I was seeking to gain further international experience, that I came across the call from the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the recruitment of Junior Professional Officers (JPO) in different United Nations agencies. It was through this programme that I joined the research department of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Vienna, Austria. After three years at UNODC, I applied for a position as a Research Associate at the Centre for Policy Research), which had just been created within the United Nations University. At the time I knew nothing about this organisation, but the prospect of joining a team from its inception and contributing to the development of its strategic vision appealed to me. That's how I spent two and a half years in Tokyo!

After more than five years working at various UN headquarters, I sought to gain field experience in peace missions. I was placed on a roster for this type of position after a competitive process, and I ended up joining the United Nations Verification Mission in Colombia shortly after the signing of the peace agreement between the government and the former FARC-EP guerrillas. This experience was an important turning point in my career. I rediscovered a love of being in the field and the true meaning of UN work. I felt the impact of the values of this organisation, and the confidence that it could generate, especially with the ex-combatants who handed their weapons over to us.

What did your training and education contribute to the position you hold today?  

Nearly 14 years after completing my Master's degree in Comparative Politics/Latin America specialisation at Sciences Po (which doesn't make me any younger!), here I am working in Haiti with the United Nations: I believe that the contribution that my training and education has made speaks for itself! It was in answering your questions that I realised just how much my training and education has guided and helped me throughout my career.

During my Master's degree at Sciences Po, I began to take an interest in issues of crime and governance in the countries of the Latin American region, and particularly in Central America. At the time, I did my dissertation research on anti-gang policies in El Salvador (the gangs are called maras and/or pandillas), and today I’m in Haiti working on these same issues. There’s no doubt that the regional, linguistic and technical skills I gained at Sciences Po have greatly contributed to my ability to perform my duties at the United Nations.

Would you have any advice to give to a student who wants to go into the field in which you work today?

For those who want to start a career at the United Nations, I highly recommend closely following the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ recruitment calendar for the Junior Professional Officer (JPO) Programme, it really opened the doors to what I have been passionate about for more than 10 years! It allowed me to get a foot in the door of an organisation that can often seem impenetrable and inaccessible. I also recommend applying to the International Volunteers Programme, I’ve worked with many of them and it’s also a good way to gain experience in the organisation and start your career at a relatively junior level.

In my case, having a regional specialisation has greatly helped me, not only at the beginning but throughout my career. Indeed, at the time of my job interview with the UNODC team more than ten years ago, they told me that they were going to start a regional report on Central America and the Caribbean, and that was why they liked my profile: I had both the necessary language skills and the knowledge of the region, due to my research work at Sciences Po. The fact of having worked on and in Latin America, particularly in the context of my research at the School of Research, also helped me to raise my profile with the United Nations Verification Mission in Colombia, and more recently, to join the United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti. 

Learn more

=> See all the Graduates' Portraits

[ April 2022 ]

 

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Louise BOSETTI, Promotion 2009

Pouvez-vous retracer votre parcours universitaire ? Comment est né votre intérêt pour la Science politique ?

Je suis rentrée à Sciences Po en 2006 en Master, à l’issue de trois années de classes préparatoires au lycée Henri IV (filière « B/L », soit lettres et sciences sociales) et d’une équivalence obtenue à l’Université de La Sorbonne en Histoire.

Je dois avouer qu’à l’époque je n’étais pas très sûre de mon choix de Master, venant d’une filière où l’on m’avait plutôt préparée pour d’autres Ecoles et pas tant sensibilisée sur les options qui s’offraient à moi à Sciences Po. Cependant, ayant développé un goût pour la recherche durant mes années de classes préparatoires, j’ai décidé de mon tourner vers un Master Politique Comparée qui intégrait à la fois des éléments du « tronc commun » de Sciences Po et des enseignements spécifiques de l’Ecole de la Recherche. Quant au choix de la spécialité Amérique Latine, il est né à la fois d’un intérêt de toujours pour cette région, du fait de mes racines hispanophones et de ma proximité linguistique avec la région, et d’un contexte particulièrement marquant au tournant des années 2000 dans cette partie du monde. En effet, les développements politiques et sociaux qui ont marqué le sous-continent à partir du tournant du XXIème siècle ont particulièrement avivé mon intérêt pour une région qui suscitait, depuis longtemps déjà, ma curiosité.

Que vous ont apporté vos années d’études à L’École de la recherche (Ex École doctorale) ? Quels souvenirs gardez-vous de votre école, de votre promotion, de vos enseignant-e-s ?

Sans hésitation une grande ouverture d’esprit et une ouverture sur le monde incroyable. Je me souviens encore de ma promotion, majoritairement intégrée par des étudiantes et étudiants latino-américain(e)s, c’était d’une richesse fabuleuse !

La flexibilité du Master de recherche m’a également permis de développer mon indépendance intellectuelle et de découvrir une région qui m’était jusqu’alors inconnue. A l’époque (je ne sais pas si c’est encore le cas), la deuxième année du Master était consacrée au travail de recherche pour le mémoire. Même si au départ cela m’angoissait quelque peu, au final cette expérience a été grandement formatrice et enrichissante. J’ai fini par passer plus de deux mois à San Salvador, avec un autre compagnon de promotion, ce qui m’a appris à développer non seulement sur mes aptitudes de recherche mais également mes capacités d’adaptation dans un contexte tellement différent et, à l’époque, assez volatile au niveau sécuritaire.

Plus de 14 ans plus tard, je suis très heureuse de me retrouver à nouveau dans cette région que j’ai découvert grâce à Science Po et à l’Ecole de la Recherche.

Quel est l’enseignant-e ou l’enseignement qui vous a le plus marqué ?

Il est difficile de choisir ! cependant j’ai un souvenir très vif des cours magistraux de Bertrand Badie dans le cadre de ce qui s’appelait alors « espace mondial ». La clarté de ses arguments m’a donné des grilles de lecture qui continuent aujourd’hui de m’éclairer et m’aident à lire et comprendre l’actualité et l’histoire mondiale contemporaine. A l’Ecole de la Recherche, j’ai particulièrement été marquée par les cours de politiques publiques d’Yves Surel, qui est devenu mon directeur de mémoire et qui m’a accompagnée pendant mes quelques années de thèse, avant que je ne décide finalement d’opter pour une autre voie. Enfin la gentillesse d’Oliver Dabène, alors directeur de la Spécialité Amérique Latine, et sa connaissance profonde de la région m’ont également grandement marquée et ont fait de ce passage par l’Ecole Doctorale un moment extrêmement formateur, tant sur le plan académique que personnel.

Quelle fonction occupez-vous aujourd’hui ?

Actuellement je travaille au sein du Bureau Intégré des Nations Unies en Haiti (BINUH), à Port-au-Prince, dans la section qui s’occupe des thèmes de Désarmement, Démobilisation et Réintégration et de Reduction de la Violence Communautaire. Cela fait plus de 10 ans que je travaille avec les Nations Unies, où j’ai commencé à travailler en 2011 comme Jeune Experte Associée au Bureau des Nations Unies contre la Drogue et le Crime (ONUDC) à Vienne, en Autriche. Depuis j’ai eu l’opportunité de travailler avec différentes entités des Nations Unies tant au Japon, qu’en Colombie et, depuis peu, en Haïti.

Quelles ont été les principales étapes de la construction de votre projet professionnel ?

Pour être tout à fait honnête, la construction de mon projet professionnel a été quelque peu mouvante et pleine de rebondissements pas toujours soigneusement prémédités !

Après avoir tout d’abord tenté la voie académique en m’inscrivant a un Doctorat à l’Ecole de la Recherche de Sciences Po en 2008 juste à la sortie de mon Master, je me suis progressivement rendu compte que ce n’était pas ma voie, du moins pas à ce moment-là. Je me sentais encore trop « jeune » pour pouvoir contribuer pleinement au débat académique et je ressentais le besoin d’acquérir de l’expérience professionnelle hors du champ académique pour éventuellement y contribuer plus en amont. C’est ainsi que j’ai décidé de quitter le programme doctoral de l’Ecole de la Recherche fin 2010. J’en parle ici car on n’entend pas souvent parler des personnes qui décident d’abandonner leur doctorat et des opportunités qui peuvent également découler d’un changement d’orientation en cours de carrière. C’est donc un message important que je veux communiquer aux lecteurs et lectrices de cette page ! Même si, à ce moment-là, cela pouvait être perçu comme un certain « échec » (renoncer à ma bourse, quitter le programme doctoral), je suis convaincue que c’était la bonne décision et qu’elle m’a permis de trouver ma voie dans un domaine dans lequel je m’épanouis pleinement depuis plus de 10 ans !

C’est alors un peu par hasard, cherchant à internationaliser davantage mon profil, que je suis tombée, début 2011, sur l’appel du Ministère des Affaires Etrangères pour le recrutement de Jeunes Experts Associes (JEA) au sein de différentes agences des Nations Unies. C’est par ce programme que j’ai intégré le département de recherche du Bureau des Nations Unies contre la Drogue et le Crime (ONUDC) à Vienne, en Autriche. Après trois années passées à l’ONUDC, j’ai postulé à un poste de Chercheuse Associée auprès d’un centre de recherche (Centre for Policy Research) qui venait d’être créé au sein de l’Université des Nations Unies. A l’époque je ne connaissais rien de cette organisation, mais la perspective de rejoindre une équipe dès sa création et de contribuer au développement de sa vision stratégique m’a séduite. C’est ainsi que j’ai passé deux ans et demi à Tokyo !

Après plus de cinq ans à travailler dans différents sièges des Nations Unies, j’ai cherché à acquérir une expérience de terrain au sein de missions de paix. Suite à mon placement sur un « roster » pour ce genre de poste au terme d’un processus compétitif, j’ai finalement intégré la Mission de Vérification des Nations Unies en Colombie peu après la signature de l’accord de paix entre le gouvernement et l’ancienne guérilla des FARC-EP. Cette expérience a marqué un important tournant dans ma carrière. C’est là que j’ai redécouvert l’amour du terrain et la véritable signification du travail onusien. C’est là que j’ai ressenti l’impact des valeurs de cette organisation, et la confiance que cela pouvait générer auprès notamment des anciens combattants qui nous remettaient leurs armes.

Quelles ont été les contributions de votre formation à la fonction que vous occupez aujourd'hui ?  

Près de 14 ans après avoir terminé mon Master en Politique Comparée/Spécialité Amérique Latine à Sciences Po (ce qui ne me rajeunit pas !), me voici travaillant en Haïti avec les Nations Unies : je crois que la contribution de ma formation parle d’elle-même ! C’est d’ailleurs en répondant à vos questions que je me suis rendu compte à quel point ma formation m’avait guidée et aidée tout au long de ma carrière.

Dès mon master de recherche à Sciences Po j’ai commencé à m’intéresser aux questions de criminalité et de gouvernance dans les pays de la région latino-américaine, et particulièrement en Amérique Centrale. A l’époque, j’ai réalisé mon mémoire de recherche sur les politiques de lutte contre les gangs au Salvador (là-bas appelées maras et/ou pandillas), et aujourd’hui je suis en Haïti travaillant sur ces mêmes questions. Il ne fait aucun doute que les compétences tant régionales, linguistiques que techniques apprises à Sciences Po ont largement contribué à ce que je puisse aujourd’hui réaliser les fonctions qui m’incombent aux Nations Unies.

Auriez-vous un conseil à donner à un-e  étudiant-e qui souhaite s'orienter vers le secteur d’activité dans lequel vous travaillez aujourd'hui ?

Pour qui veut commencer une carrière aux Nations Unies, je ne peux que chaudement recommander de suivre de près le calendrier d’appel au recrutement de Jeunes Experts Associes (JEA) du Ministère des Affaires Etrangères, il m’a vraiment ouvert les portes de ce qui depuis plus de 10 ans me passionne ! Cela m’a permis de mettre un pied dans une organisation qui peut souvent paraitre hermétique et inaccessible. Je recommande également de postuler au programme de Volontaires Internationaux, j’ai travaillé avec beaucoup d’entre eux et c’est également une bonne façon d’acquérir de l’expérience dans l’organisation et de commencer sa carrière à un niveau relativement junior.

Dans mon cas, le fait d’avoir une spécialisation régionale m’a grandement aidée, non seulement au début mais aussi tout au long de ma carrière. En effet, au moment de mon entretien d’embauche avec l’équipe de l’ONUDC il y a plus de dix ans, ils m’ont indiqué qu’ils allaient commencer un rapport régional sur l’Amérique Centrale et les Caraïbes, et c’est pourquoi mon profil leur a plu : j’avais à la fois les compétences linguistiques nécessaires et la connaissance de la région, du fait de mes travaux de recherche menés à Sciences Po. Par la suite, le fait d’avoir travaillé sur et en Amérique Latine, notamment dans le cadre de mes recherches à l’Ecole de la Recherche, m’a également aidé à valoriser mon profil auprès de la Mission de Vérification des Nations Unies en Colombie, et plus récemment, de rejoindre le Bureau Intégré des Nations Unies en Haiti. 

En savoir plus

=> Voir tous les portraits de diplômées et diplômés

[ Avril 2022 ]

 

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Save the date - Political Theory – SPOT seminar

Populism and Civil Society - Book party with Jean L. Cohen and Andrew Arato , MAY 20, 2022 3pm – 7 pm

Sciences Po 1, place saint Thomas, 75007 Paris K wing, Room K008.

Guest speakers : 

Jean L. Cohen and Andrew Arato (Columbia University, the New School)
Pierre Rosanvallon (Collège de France)
Stefan Rummens (KUL Leuven)
Oliver Gerstenberg (UCL)

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QS Rankings 2022

Sciences Po ranked 3rd best university in the world in "Politics & International Studies"
  • QS Rankings 2022QS Rankings 2022

QS 2022 : For nearly 10 years, QS World University Rankings, which compares more than 1,500 universities worldwide, has consistently confirmed Sciences Po as one of the best higher education and research institutions in the social sciences.

This year, Sciences Po is ranked 3rd in "Politics & International Studies" ahead of the London School of Economics and Political Studies and Princeton University. At the European Union level, Sciences Po is ranked first in this subject.

Worldwide, Sciences Po is ranked 20th in Social Policy and Administration; 31st in Sociology; 34th in Development Studies; 51st in Law; 82nd in Economics & Econometrics

Find more out

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PhD Candidate in comparative politics and representation

ANR-DFG programme UNEQUALMAND - Call to application
  • Actualité Sciences PoActualité Sciences Po

The Center for European Studies and Comparative Politics (CEE) at Sciences Po invites applications for a PhD fellowship on political inequalities in mandate representation, as part of the ANR-DFG project "Unequal mandate responsiveness? How electoral promises and their realizations target groups in France and Germany" (UNEQUALMAND).

The position is announced for a period of 3 years. There are no teaching obligations. Yet, a daily involvement in the project’s and research center’s activities is expected. The starting date for the fellowship is 1 September 2022.

Environment: The Center for European Studies and Comparative Politics

The CEE is a joint research unit of CNRS (UMR8239) and Sciences Po. It was founded in 2005 to pursue three main missions: to develop research on European questions and comparative politics at Sciences Po; to facilitate Sciences Po’s insertion in European research networks; to foster the European debate on the future of Europe. The quality of the CEE was acknowledged by the CNRS, granting a full integration of the CEE.

It is currently bringing together 34 full-time researchers and professors, 26 PhD students, and a large number of research associates and guest researchers. They form a strong team through their shared approach to research and participatory governance.  The Centre’s researchers are affiliated with four departments (political science, sociology, law and history), with the School of Research as well as with the Paris School for International Affairs (PSIA), Urban School and School of Public Affairs.

Most of the research projects carried out at the CEE adopt an international and/or comparative approach, and the results are published in international peer-reviewed journals. About 90 scientific events take place every year, gathering scholars, media and civil society. The CEE contributes to the structuration of the European Research Space in social and political sciences, especially through the design and management of various programs and partnerships supported by EU institutions like the European Research Council.

With international research as its main purpose, the CEE sets major emphasis on PhD students’ training and supervision.

The PhD will benefit from all the facilities at Sciences Po, including a workplace, an extended access to the library and the electronic resources and a scientific support within the research center. This includes opportunities to develop scientific exchange as part of the teams working on the center’s various key themes, in particular on “strains on democratic representation” and “the state as producer of public policies”.

Project

Led by Isabelle Guinaudeau, Elisa Deiss-Helbig and Theres Matthiess, UNEQUALMAND examines political (in-)equality in France and Germany through the lens of group representation, with a focus on mandates and their realization in the form of policies. The project looks at the supply as well as the demand-side of political competition. How do pledges and fulfilled policy appeal to groups with different characteristics? How and under what conditions do citizens respond to group targeting in electoral manifestos (prospective) and pledge fulfillment (retrospective)? These questions will be addressed using an innovative research design that combines data on electoral promises, surveys, experimental designs, and case-studies. The project is based at Sciences Po, the University of Trier, and University of Stuttgart.

Job description

The tasks include:

•  Own scientific qualification (PhD)
•  Involvement in collecting the data relevant to own PhD research
•  Case studies on group-targeting in electoral pledges and effective policy
•  Supporting the organization of team meetings and workshops
•  Assistance with project reports and publications

Supervision and PhD programme

• The PhD will be co-supervised by Isabelle Guinaudeau and Emiliano Grossman at Sciences Po, CEE, with additional opportunities to exchange with the UNEQUALMAND international research team.
• The successful candidate will be enrolled in the PhD programme of Sciences Po (School of Research) and the work will result in a doctorate in political science.

Requirements are:
• a master's degree in political science or a related discipline,
• excellent academic track record
• interest in research on representation, party competition, voting, and/or political inequality,
• ability to work both in a team and independently
• excellent French and English language skills

Desirable, but not required:
• Knowledge of German
• Knowledge of social science methods, text analysis, statistical software (e.g. R, Stata) and/or mixed methods
• Knowledge of LaTeX
• Knowledge of Git

We offer
In addition to the benefits of taking a team PhD as part of UNEQUALMAND, Sciences Po offers:
• Competitive salary
• Academically stimulating working environment
• Vibrant, integrated and international research community

Application procedure

Applications must be submitted by 18 May 2022:  
Online Admission: The application must be submitted exclusively online, according to the Admissions calendar.

The application must include the following documents:
• Copy of ID
• Letter of motivation
• Outline of ideas for the doctoral project (2,000-3,000 words) and a summary
• Copy of BA and MA (if already available) degree diplomas
• CV with full summary of education, practice, academic and non-academic work experience, language proficiency, positions of trust, and other qualifying/extra-curricular activities. The period of enrolment (admission-completion) in the Master’s study programme must be specified
• If applicable: up to two academic publications (i.e. MA thesis or published articles)
• Optional: up to two references

As the application is completed, please send an email to Linda Amrani, General Secretary of the CEE (linda.amrani@sciencespo.fr) to confirm that you have applied for the UNEQUALMAND PhD position.

Equally well qualified disabled persons will be given priority. Women and people with an immigration background are expressly invited to apply.

If you have any questions, please send an e-mail to Isabelle Guinaudeau ( iguinaudeau@gmail.com)

Job interviews are planned for 31 May, 2022.

Download: 

=> PhD Candidate in comparative politics and representation (ANR-DFG programme UNEQUALMAND) (PDF 116 Ko)

Tags :

Colombe SAILLARD, Class of 2021

PhD Student at the Collège de France and the EHESS | Graduated from the Master in Sociology
  • Colombe SAILLARD | Master in Sociology © Patrick Imbert / Collège de FranceColombe SAILLARD | Master in Sociology © Patrick Imbert / Collège de France

Can you tell us about your academic background?

After obtaining a scientific baccalaureate in Nantes, I entered the University of Rennes 1 to do a degree in mathematics with a parallel degree in philosophy. Having confirmed my interest in mathematics during the first year, I chose to join the University of Paris 6 (now Paris Sorbonne University) to complete my degree in mathematics. 

At the end of this degree, I entered the ENSAE (École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Economique), which seemed to me to be the ideal place to continue receiving a stimulating and demanding education in mathematics while re-engaging with humanities and social sciences disciplines such as economics and sociology.

Having greatly appreciated the sociology courses given at the ENSAE, I wanted to take the “Data Science and Social Sciences” track in my third year and join the Sociology Master's programme at the School of Research as part of the dual degree agreement between the ENSAE and Sciences Po.

The training provided by Sciences Po seemed to me to be a useful complement to the training I received at the ENSAE from the point of view of survey methods, themes and conceptual approaches. I was particularly interested in the sociology of science, an interest that was confirmed at Sciences Po when, in my second year, under the supervision of Jérôme Aust, I wrote a research paper on the creation of a museum space for the general public in a large Parisian research institute. This year I am continuing my studies with doctoral research, on a subject that is still related to mathematics but which I am examining more from a sociology of education perspective, under the supervision of Pierre-Michel Menger.

How did your interest in sociology begin?

My initial contact with sociology goes back to my year on the philosophy degree, where, in the context of a course on the epistemology of the humanities and social sciences that I appreciated very much, I was able to familiarise myself with the great founding authors of the discipline (Durkheim, Marx, Weber, etc.).

Afterwards, I didn’t have the opportunity to read or do sociology until I entered the ENSAE, where an introductory course in this discipline was given in the first year. I really liked the very empirical approach of this course, which allowed me to gain a very concrete idea of the type of results that a research practice in sociology could produce. So I started to read articles and books in sociology related to this course, and in my everyday life I also started to pay attention to the effects that the sociological approach, as an endeavour to objectify social realities via specific methods of inquiry, could or might have on a number of issues occupying the public debate.

At the end of my first year at the ENSAE, I did an internship at the Centre for Studies in Social Change (OSC) under Louis-André Vallet, which I enjoyed immensely, particularly in that it allowed me to put into practice the technical tools that I had already acquired, in order to produce knowledge on absolutely fascinating issues of intergenerational social mobility.

It seems to me that this internship constituted a second important moment in initiating my interest in sociology; beyond what this discipline seemed to me to bring on the theoretical and practical level, I learned to appreciate the daily work of the researcher in sociology, which seems to me to be particularly varied and stimulating.

What did your years of study at the Sciences Po School of Research (formerly the Doctoral School) bring you?

The main contributions of my studies at the School of Research are threefold. First of all, I found the training to be extremely comprehensive in terms of the survey methods it introduced us to; already being familiar with quantitative surveys due to my previous studies, I appreciated the discovery of qualitative survey methods such as biographical or organisational interviews, non-participant ethnographic observation and the analysis of written sources.

More generally, I have the impression that my time on this Master's programme has provided me with the keys to constructing a sociological process of asking questions and to building a research approach and a methodology of investigation that allow me to answer them. This aspect is, in my opinion, crucial in the practice of research in sociology, and it seems to me to be essential to try it (notably through the writing of the dissertation) before committing oneself to a doctorate.

Secondly, in this Master's degree I seem to have discovered a number of research themes in sociology that I would not have been spontaneously interested in, but which have enabled me to attain a better understanding of what constitutes current research, and to have some important references on a certain number of subjects.

Finally, the third contribution of this training is more concerned with the aspects of socialisation to research; it seems to me that by discussing with other students, our teachers and our dissertation supervisors, we have begun to get an idea of the issues and the main difficulties of the profession of researcher in sociology.

Which teacher or teaching has had the greatest impact on you?

One course that has had a huge impact on me is the Sociology of Public Action taught by Christine Musselin and Philippe Bézès. It was an extremely dense course, dealing with issues that I was not particularly sensitive to at the outset, but which both teachers made me see the interest in. In retrospect, this course seems to me to be very important in the context of our training insofar as aspects of public policy are likely to be found in most of the subjects on which we will choose to work in the future. I had the impression that I came away from this course having acquired a certain number of tools for analysing public action that I will be able to apply to various subjects, while also knowing how to contextualise them conceptually, referring in particular to the extremely extensive reading lists that were given to us in each class. We had the opportunity to put these tools into practice directly in the course validation exercise, which consisted of an analysis of a public policy of our choice or proposed by the teachers.

What memories do you have of your school, your class, your teachers?

Unfortunately, it seems to me that my experience at Sciences Po was not really what it should have been because of the COVID epidemic which forced us to follow the course via distance learning for more than a year. Nevertheless, there was a very supportive environment between most of the students during this period, without which it would have been difficult to keep going. I also remember the kindness of some teachers and members of the administrative staff, and more generally the impression of having been intellectually stimulated and humanly accompanied throughout my two years of Master’s study.

What is your current role?

I am now in my first year of doctoral studies at the Collège de France and the EHESS. I am working on educational and extracurricular trajectories in mathematics. The objective of my work is to describe and understand the mathematical pathways (in terms of performance, orientation and subjective experience) of French primary and secondary school students in and around school. One of the main issues of the work is to try to understand how social factors, and also the school context, allow us to account for failure and success in mathematics (as characterised by the school institution) and especially for how this is concentrated in different social spaces. I seek to answer these questions by mobilising both the quantitative exploitation of large national and international surveys, and fieldwork (observations and interviews).

Would you have any advice to give to a student who wants to go into the field in which you work today?

My initial experiences in the field of sociological research lead me to believe that it is above all important for students who wish to pursue this path to be confronted with the practice of sociological inquiry through internships or methodology courses. Indeed, it seems to me that beyond an interest in the discipline and the questions it allows us to ask, it is necessary to ensure that one enjoys doing the work that constitutes the daily life of a sociology researcher.

Learn more

=> See all the Graduates' Portraits

[ April 2022 ]

 

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Sciences Po at 150

Discover the editorial and events programme
  • Sciences Po |Roots of the future (1872-2022)Sciences Po |Roots of the future (1872-2022)

L'ouverture de notre nouveau campus au 1 Place Saint Thomas le 28 janvier était la première d'une série d'événements marquant le 150e anniversaire de l'université. Sciences Po dévoile aujourd'hui le programme éditorial et événementiel d'une année consacrée à la célébration du patrimoine et au partage des savoirs. Entre récits passés, présents et futurs, tout au long de l'année 2022, Sciences Po s'appuiera sur son histoire pour se projeter dans l'avenir sous différents formats et supports.

Poésie parlée pour le film anniversaire

Sciences Po continues to follow in the footsteps of its founders: working to advance the common good by training informed and responsible leaders who are mindful of their impact on future generations. In under two minutes, this anniversary film brings together past, present and future generations. It highlights Sciences Po’s pioneering role in various fields: the design of innovative educational programmes in the humanities and social sciences; interactive teaching methods; internationalisation; social inclusion; gender equality and welcoming refugee students. The video features imagery from Sciences Po's picture archives and a spoken word poem recited by members of the Sciences Po community: students, faculty, researchers, administrative staff and alumni.

A calendar of key events

To mark the anniversary, Sciences Po has organised an exciting programme of events.

Highlights include an inaugural lecture by Beate Klarsfeld on the theme of transmission and engagement, which will mark the opening of the new academic year at the end of August 2022. All staff and students are invited to attend the lecture, which will also be streamed online for the general public.

Another key event of the year will be our 150 Years Festival, taking place on the weekend of 16, 17 and 18 September as part of Europe Heritage Day 2022. The festival will be an opportunity for all of Sciences Po’s communities and international partners to gather and celebrate their collective work to advance education and knowledge. It will also be a chance for the wider public to (re)discover the university’s buildings and architectural heritage, activities and careers, as well as its communities.

A detailed programme of events for your agenda will be published shortly on the 150 Years website.

A beautiful book retracing the history of Sciences Po was published by the Sciences Po University Press last June. It is illustrated with images from an unpublished photo-report by Philippe Chancel, taken at the new Paris campus, and from Sciences Po’s rich picture and document archive. While our university is often the subject of myths and fantasies, this new book strives to provide a more faithful representation of the university and an explanation of its origins.

Podcasts revisiting talks by major speakers at Sciences Po

Sciences Po has teamed up with France Culture to produce a series of inspiring lectures, inaugural speeches and courses recorded since the 1990s, which you can now listen to in podcast format. Discover talks by politicians, academics, researchers, artists and writers from France and abroad, grouped into collections by theme and available on the 150 Years website, the franceculture.fr website and the radiofrance app.

A first collection published after the first round of the French presidential election explores the topical theme of “Politics, Democracy and Elections”.

Find out more about the podcasts you can listen to: A new partnership with France Culture: Inspiring podcasts, presidential election analysis (Fr)

A new CEVIPOF survey of Sciences Po students

20 years after the first study conducted by Anne Muxel, the Centre for Political Research at Sciences Po (CEVIPOF) is launching a new survey of Sciences Po students to get a clearer sense of their ideas and concerns. How do they see the world and what are their values? What can we take away from their concerns and expectations about their individual and collective futures? What causes do they support, what are their views on citizenship and politics? Look out for the results of the study when they are published in autumn 2022.

A new 150 Years website 

The full editorial and events programme for the 150th anniversary celebrations is now available on a dedicated website.  A digital timeline charting “150 Years of History” tells the story of Sciences Po since its founding in 1872.

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Présidentielle 2022

Les démocraties à l’épreuve de l’extrême droite en France et en Europe
  • Actualité Sciences PoActualité Sciences Po

Le 24 avril, pour la troisième fois dans l’histoire de la Ve République, une candidate de l’extrême droite sera présente au second tour de l’élection présidentielle et pourrait arriver à l’Elysée. Cette possibilité soulève une série d’interrogations : que représente exactement cette famille politique historiquement et présentement, quel est son programme politique, économique, social et culturel, de quelle base sociologique dispose-t-elle, qu’est-ce que sa force actuelle révèle-t-elle de l’état de la démocratie française ? Politistes et historiens répondront à ces questionnements dans une première table ronde.

Mais la France n’est pas un cas exceptionnel. Nombre de pays européens enregistrent une progression de l’extrême droite qui peut constituer une force importante d’opposition mais aussi accéder au pouvoir et gouverner, instaurant, dans certains cas, des démocraties illibérales. Au Parlement européen, les représentants de ces partis tentent d’imposer leurs orientations critiques de l’Union européenne. Le seconde table ronde s’intéressera à l’analyse des caractéristiques et aux développements de l’extrême droite en Europe.

10h15-10h25 : Introduction par Mathias Vicherat, directeur de Sciences Po.

10h25-11h35 : L’extrême droite en France

  • Martial Foucault, Centre de recherches politiques de Sciences Po (CEVIPOF)
  • Florence Haegel, Centre d’études européennes et de politique comparée de Sciences Po
  • Eric Heyer, Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques (OFCE)
  • Nonna Mayer, Centre d’études européennes et de politique comparée de Sciences Po
  • Gilles Richard, Société française d’Histoire politique.

11h40-12h15 : L’extrême droite en Europe

  • Marc Lazar, Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po
  • Olivier Rozenberg, Centre d’études européennes et de politique comparée de Sciences Po
  • Jacques Rupnik, Centre de recherches internationales de Sciences Po (CERI).

Les tables rondes seront animées par deux journalistes de France Culture Emmanuel Laurentin et Chloé Cambreling.

Cet événement est proposé par plusieurs centres de recherche de Sciences Po : Centre d’études européennes et de Politique comparée ; Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po ; Centre de recherches internationales (CERI) ; Centre de recherches politiques (CEVIPOF) ; Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques (OFCE).

En partenariat avec France Culture.

#ScPo2022

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The Academic Board calls to defeat Marine Le Pen

  • Actualité Sciences PoActualité Sciences Po

Declaration adopted by the Academic Board of the Institut d'Etudes Politiques on April 19, 2022, by 20 votes in favour, one against and two abstentions.

Since 1872 and especially since the creation of the Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques (FNSP) in 1945, our university has always promoted values of freedom, social and international openness and humanism, and has made academic freedom an essential framework.

Currently, threats and intimidation by the far right are widespread, as with the intimidation suffered by students in Nancy on Wednesday 13 April and the attack on students peacefully demonstrating in front of 27 rue Saint-Guillaume on Thursday 14 April by individuals claiming to be from Génération Zemmour, the Cocarde étudiante and the national branch of the UNI union.

The approach of the second round of the French presidential election sees its share of alternative truths, threats, and violence fueled by an extreme right that has retained its ideological matrix: discrimination against foreigners under the guise of national preference; rejection of the rule of law by challenging the preamble to the 1946 Constitution and the role of the Constitutional Council; threats to social achievements as essential as the abolition of the death penalty.

Because we are an international university open to the world, with 50% international students;

Because we welcome students and researchers who are refugees from Afghanistan, Ukraine and other countries that are suffering from wars and the suppression of fundamental freedoms;

Because we refuse to discriminate against foreigners under the guise of national preference;

Because we are attached to the defense of the rule of law protected by the preamble of the 1946 Constitution and the role of the Constitutional Council.

Because we have been involved for several decades in the development of Europe's academic ambition (and recently through the CIVICA network);

Because the Rassemblement National is part of a long tradition of violence in universities and jeopardizing the principle of academic freedoms;

Because throughout history and in contemporary examples (Hungary, Poland, Brazil, etc.), the far right in power has always had the goal of bringing universities under control, and in particular the humanities and social sciences;

Because we are committed, in our research and educative work, to the fight against discrimination and inequality and in favour of the ecological transition;

Because we participate in the promotion of exchange and tolerance, as illustrated by the interfaith Emouna project which celebrates its fifth year of existence;

Because we are committed to the values of the Republic, which were the foundation of Sciences Po since its creation by Emile Boutmy at the beginning of the Third Republic;

Because the ideas of the Rassemblement National are in clear contradiction with a democratic society that relies on science;

The Academic Board calls more than ever on voters to defend, through their vote, all the freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution and by law, in particular the freedom of education and research which is essential for the future of our society. This demand implies the full respect of the procedures that have governed the revision of the Constitution since 1958.

Therefore, the Academic Board resolutely calls to defeat Marine Le Pen on 24 April.

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Research Career Week

18 - 22 April, at Sciences Po
  • Research Career Week Research Career Week

What does a researcher's job involve? Whether they work in academic or applied research, researchers contribute to the growth of knowledge in their field by conducting research and scientific projects on new issues in a vast field of the humanities and social sciences: law, economics, history, sociology, political science, international relations, data and urban planning, environment… Whatever their discipline, researchers promote and disseminate their results to the scientific, institutional and economic communities (companies and organisations).

PROGRAM

TUESDAY 19 APRIL

12h30 - 2h00 pm: Opening Round Table: Working in research

Speakers:

  • Hugo de Tarlé, Spécialiste en études économiques à la Banque de France (Master de sociologie, 2018) 
  • Delphine Allès Professeure des universités en Science politique à l’INALCO (Doctorat de Science politique, 2011)
  • Lucas Spinosa, Researcher Enel Foundation , (diplômé Ecole d'affaires publiques de SciencesPo & Fudan University, 2020)
  • Hemal Thakker, Research Assistant, Observatory of Populism, Institut Montaigne and Consultant at Expertise France (diplômé de PSIA, School of International Affairs, Master in Environmental Policy)
  • Parnika Ray, Director at New Global Perspectives, (diplômé de PSIA, School of International Affairs, Master in Advanced Global Studies)

Modération étudiante : Léa Settepani, étudiante en master Economie, membre du bureau de l'Association SORA (School of Research Association).

Learn more and subscribe

THURSDAY 21 APRIL 

5h00 - 6h30 pm: Round Table: Working in applied research

Speakers: 

  • Elise Cathala, Chargée d'études opinion chez Viavoice (Master en science politique, 2020)
  • Agnès Casado, Manager - Innovation et politiques publiques, chez ALCIMED (Master en histoire 2013) 
  • Julie Lenoir, Informaticienne au Services des Enquêtes de l'Ined (Master en économie, 2018)  
  • Gabriele Mariani, Research Executive chez Kantar Public (Master en sociologie, 2021) 
  • Hugo Plassais, Apprenti rédacteur Affaires économiques chez Business France (Master en sciences politique, 2020) 

Modération étudiante : Jeanne-Louise Roellinger, étudiante du master en science politique étudiante, majeure Relations internationales et Simon Audebert, étudiant en master en science politique, majeure comportement politique, tous deux membres du bureau de l'Association SORA (School of Research Association).

Learn more and subscribe

6h30 - 8h00 pm: Networking rersearch careers

Meet Sciences Po graduates working in applied research, within companies and organisations, or in academic research. They will be able to tell you more about how they have built up their careers and provide you with precious advice.

See the list of graduate students already enrolled...

=> Learn more and subscribe 

 

 

 

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Tribute to Jean-Paul Fitoussi

  • Jean-Paul Fitoussi, professeur des universités émérite à Sciences Po © T. ArrivéJean-Paul Fitoussi, professeur des universités émérite à Sciences Po © T. Arrivé

Laurence Bertrand Dorleac, Chair of the National Foundation of Political Science (FNSP) and Mathias Vicherat, President of Sciences Po have the great sadness to inform that Jean-Paul Fitoussi, Professor Emeritus at Sciences Po, former President of the OFCE, former Chairman of our Academic Board and former member and Vice President of our Board of Directors, passed away last night in his 79th year.

Born in La Goulette, Tunisia, in 1942, Jean-Paul Fitoussi began his teaching career at the University of Strasbourg at the end of the 1960s, before joining the European University Institute in Florence in 1979; both Italy and Tunisia remained close to his heart. Attracted to Sciences Po by the economists of rue Saint-Guillaume and, more particularly, by Jean-Marcel Jeanneney, he succeeded the founder of the OFCE (French Economic Observatory) in 1989 and remained President of this important centre of research and expertise until 2010.

A brilliant and committed economist, internationally recognised by his peers, respected and loved by generations of students, consulted and listened to by the highest political leaders, read and heard by a wide audience, Jean-Paul Fitoussi was an eminent figure in his discipline.

Jean-Paul Fitoussi always endeavoured to put the most rigorous research and solidly substantiated studies at the service of economic policy, but also and above all at the service of citizens, who could not fully exercise their sovereignty today without what could be called a ‘general economic culture’. Jean-Paul Fitoussi promoted this general economic culture in two ways, in the lecture halls of Sciences Po and on the public stage.

Among all the commissions and councils he chaired or served on, there is one that was particularly close to his heart, the “Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress”, which, together with his two friends Joseph Stiglitz and Amartya Sen, he led in 2008-2009.

Jean-Paul Fitoussi was familiar with the greatest economists (Amartya Sen, Edmund Phelps and Joseph Stiglitz to name but a few) who, thanks to him, were frequent visitors to the OFCE and the Department of Economics, and the latter two of whom Sciences Po awarded honorary doctorates. Fitoussi’s modesty did not prevent him from showing his pleasure in and taste for intellectual dialogue and collective research with his peers, allowing Sciences Po to benefit from his prestigious network.

Jean-Paul Fitoussi contributed to many institutions in France, Europe and beyond, but he served none better and more faithfully than Sciences Po.

For forty years, he was one of the great architects of our establishment.

By presiding over and promoting the OFCE for more than twenty years, and by founding the Department of Economics at Sciences Po, Jean-Paul Fitoussi was foremost in contributing to making economics a major discipline at Sciences Po.

He played a central role in the life of our institution. President of the Academic Board from 1997 to 2010, member of the FNSP Board of Directors, representative of the founders for twenty years (2001- 2021), he contributed very actively to the transformation of our institution into an international research university, and played a very active and valuable role in shaping the future of Sciences Po until the last hours of his final mandate in May 2021.

One of his essential contributions was the reform of Sciences Po's tuition fees, based on the principles of progressiveness and redistribution. In 2003, the “Fitoussi Commission” submitted a report and recommendations to Richard Descoings to rethink social justice at Sciences Po. Jean-Paul Fitoussi knew that no issue is more important for our knowledge-based economies and for our open societies than the democratisation of access to higher education institutions.

A man of conviction, a courageous intellectual with a lively and piquant pen (as shown by his latest books), a subtle professor, an affable and elegant man, Jean-Paul Fitoussi was one of the emblematic figures of Sciences Po.

The thoughts of all the Sciences Po communities are with his wife, Annie, and his two children, Lisa and David.

 

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Premier Networking des métiers de la recherche

  • Actualité Sciences PoActualité Sciences Po

RENCONTREZ LES DIPLÔMÉS PARTICIPANTS


Carlos BENITEZ, Research Executive - YouGov

Carlos  BENITEZ,  Research Executive -  YouGov | Diplômé 2021, Master en Sociologie

Titulaire d’un master de sociologie à Sciences Po Paris et d’une licence de sociologie à l’Université catholique d’Asunción (Paraguay) et ancien assistant de recherche dans cette même université. J'ai été consultant dans le développement international, et notamment dans le programme Démocratie et gouvernance de CEAMSO/USAID (2016-2019). Je suis aujourd'hui Research Executive chez YouGov, un institut d’études de marché, de sondages et de data analytics. 

=> Voir sa page Linkedin 

Elise CATHALA, Chargée d’études opinion - Viavoice

Elise CATHALA, Chargée d’études opinion - Viavoice | Diplômée 2020, Master Science-politique, Politique comparée

Après deux années en hypokhâgne-khâgne lettres et sciences humaines, j'ai bifurqué vers les sciences sociales en intégrant une troisième année de licence Sociologie-Sciences politiques à l'Université Paris Dauphine. J'ai ensuite poursuivi en master de Science Politique - Politique comparée à l'École de la recherche de Sciences Po, où j'ai choisi d'approfondir en particulier la sociologie politique. Après Sciences Po, j'ai choisi de faire un Master 2 supplémentaire plus professionnalisant à Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, sur la concertation et participation citoyenne. Je travaille aujourd'hui au sein de l'institut d'études Viavoice où je suis chargée d'études qualitatives et quantitatives.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin 

Sophie CETRE, Chef du laboratoire d'économie du risque nucléaire - Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire

Sophie CETRE, Chef du laboratoire d'économie du risque nucléaire - Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire
| Diplômée 2020, Doctorat en Économie

J'ai effectué une thèse en économie à Sciences Po de 2016 à 2020 portant sur les déterminants des inégalités salariales, du point de vue de la microéconomie appliquée et de l'économie comportementale. J'ai ensuite intégré l'Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire en qualité d'économiste, sur un poste à mi-chemin entre la recherche et les études économiques en support à l'expertise. Je suis à présent chef du laboratoire d'économie du risque nucléaire de l'IRSN.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Hugo DE TARLÉ, Chargé des relations extérieures - Banque de France

Hugo DE TARLÉ, Chargé des relations extérieures - Banque de France | Diplômé 2018, Master en Sociologie

Après avoir obtenu diplôme de Sciences Po, j'ai travaillé pendant un an dans un cabinet de conseil et d'études dans le domaine de l'éducation. Puis j'ai préparé l'agrégation de sciences économiques et sociales dans les ENS parisiennes, et de mon côté, les concours de la Banque de France. A l'issue cette année de préparation, j'ai intégré la Direction des Activités Fiduciaires de la Banque de France où j'assure les relations européennes sur les sujets en liens les espèces (billets et pièces).

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Julie LENOIR, Ingénieure développeuse informatique - Institut national d'études démographiques (Ined)

Julie LENOIR, Ingénieure développeuse informatique - Institut national d'études démographiques (Ined) | Diplômée 2018, Master in Economics  

Julie Lenoir est diplômée d'un master de recherche en Economie de l'École de la Recherche de Sciences Po Paris. Elle a rejoint l’Institut national d’études démographiques (Ined) en 2020 en tant qu'ingénieure développeuse informatique et travaille à la fois sur la programmation des outils de collecte et de suivi des enquêtes ainsi que sur l’optimisation des processus de diffusions des données et métadonnées.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Gabriele MARIANI, Research Executive - Kantar Public

Gabriele MARIANI, Research Executive - Kantar Public | Diplômé 2021, Master en Sociologie

Passionate about social research and political science, after graduating from the Master in Sociology at the Sciences Po Research School in 2021, I have joined Kantar Public as an intern within their Paris-based think tank, the Centre Kantar sur le Futur de l'Europe. Following this stimulating experience, I was hired at Kantar Public Belgium, working on public opinion evidence and policy evaluation studies for the European Union and other Bruxelles-based international organizations, NGOs, academic and research institutions.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Hugo PLASSAIS, Apprenti rédacteur affaires économiques - Business France

Hugo PLASSAIS, Apprenti rédacteur affaires économiques - Business France | Diplômé 2020, Master en Science politique, relations internationales

J’ai réalisé ma recherche à Sciences Po sur la Chine et le maintien de la paix dans les livres blanc de la défense. J’ai ensuite travaillé dans un centre de recherche du MEAE à Prague, en même temps que je contribuais à l’écriture d’un documentaire sur l’économie chinoise. En rentrant, j’ai été analyste quelques mois à l’École militaire avant de rejoindre Business France où je rédige des notes sur les questions d’attractivité économique.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Justine SOBIECK, Senior Consultante - KYU Associés

Justine  SOBIECK,  Senior Consultante -  KYU Associés | Diplômée en 2016, Master en Sociologie

Consultante senior dans le cabinet KYU, je travaille depuis 6 ans dans le domaine de l'emploi-formation (études prospective, AMO, certification, data, diagnostics et audits...) et développe de nombreuses activités au sein de mon cabinet (pilotage d'équipes et de projet, management, communication, veille réglementaire...).

Voir sa page Linkedin 

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African Careers Week

From 4 to 8 April at Sciences Po
  • Semaine des carrières en Afrique Semaine des carrières en Afrique

In collaboration with the Mastercard Foundation Scholars Programme and with the Sciences Po's Directorate of International Affairs, Sciences Po Careers invites you to discover the wide variety of careers in Africa after Sciences Po. You will also have the opportunity to meet employers at the Africa Career Fair Online organised in partnership with Ashesi University in Ghana .

More information and register

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Carlos BENITEZ-ROLON, Class of 2021

Research Executive at YouGov | Graduated from the Master in Sociology
  • Carlos BENITEZ-ROLON, Graduated from the Master in Sociology (Class of 2021)Carlos BENITEZ-ROLON, Graduated from the Master in Sociology (Class of 2021)

Can you tell us about your academic background?

After a obtaining the literary baccalaureate at the French Lycée in Asunción (Paraguay), I enrolled in a Sociology degree at the Catholic University of Asunción. As well as providing me with the foundations of theory and practice, my years there made me want to continue my sociology training, which I was able to do by joining the Sciences Po School of Research, from which I graduated in 2021.

How did your interest in sociology begin?

During my final years in high school, I found the social situation in Paraguay challenging. I needed to understand the social processes – why certain changes were taking place and others were failing – which naturally led me to sociology, a field that was still underdeveloped in the country at that time.

What did your years of study at the Sciences Po School of Research (formerly the Doctoral School) bring you?

My two years at the School of Research provided me with sound, high-quality theoretical and practical training. The various courses, both in quantitative and qualitative methodology, deepened my understanding of various topics. Writing my dissertation was a formative experience, and the knowledge and research skills I acquired have proven very useful in my current work.

Which teacher or teaching has had the greatest impact on you?

I learned a lot from most of the courses I attended, but I must say that the dissertation experience (data collection and writing the text) was particularly inspiring, and I am very grateful to Professor Bruno Cousin for his invaluable support throughout this journey, and for the opportunity to discover, thanks to his guidance, the exciting world of the sociology of elites. I was also greatly impressed by Professor Agnès van Zanten’s course on the sociology of education, through which I discovered the field of the structures, causes and consequences of educational inequalities.

What memories do you have of your school, your class, your teachers?

I have very good memories of my time at the School of Research – a place where I met teachers and fellow students not only of great intellect, but also great humanity.

What is your current role?

I work as a Research Executive at YouGov, a market research, polling and data analytics company.

What were the main stages in the construction of your career plans?

Before joining Sciences Po, I had already worked in Latin America, notably at a consulting firm and in an NGO-established development programme. These experiences led me to join Sciences Po, and my degree and training enabled my entry into the world of social, political and market research.

How have your studies contributed to the position you hold today?

My training in various social research methods (especially quantitative) has proven very useful in the position I hold today. Developing my knowledge of the programming language and software R (*) and the opportunities I had to work on various problems also helped prepare me for this position.

Would you have any advice to give to a student who wants to go into the field in which you work today?

The Master's degree in Sociology from the Sciences Po School of Research offers comprehensive training that can open many doors, particularly in the world of social, political and market research. I would advise anyone who wishes to embark on a career in this field to take advantage of the good methodological training (especially quantitative) that the Master's degree offers – training that will be of great use when conducting any type of study.

 

(*) R is a programming language for statistical computing and graphics supported by the R Core Team and the R Foundation for Statistical Computing. Created by statisticians Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman, R is used among data miners, bioinformaticians and statisticians for data analysis and developing statistical software.

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=> See all the Graduates' Portraits

[ April 2022 ]

 

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Premier Networking des métiers de la recherche

à Sciences Po, Jeudi 21 avril de 18h30 à 21h , Cafétéria du 1St-Thomas
  • Networking des métiers de la rechercheNetworking des métiers de la recherche

 Rencontrez les diplômés participants

Carlos BENITEZ, Research Executive - YouGov

Carlos  BENITEZ,  Research Executive -  YouGov | Diplômé 2021, Master en Sociologie

Titulaire d’un master de sociologie à Sciences Po Paris et d’une licence de sociologie à l’Université catholique d’Asunción (Paraguay) et ancien assistant de recherche dans cette même université. J'ai été consultant dans le développement international, et notamment dans le programme Démocratie et gouvernance de CEAMSO/USAID (2016-2019). Je suis aujourd'hui Research Executive chez YouGov, un institut d’études de marché, de sondages et de data analytics. 

=> Voir sa page Linkedin 

Elise CATHALA, Chargée d’études opinion - Viavoice

Elise CATHALA, Chargée d’études opinion - Viavoice | Diplômée 2020, Master Science-politique, Politique comparée

Après deux années en hypokhâgne-khâgne lettres et sciences humaines, j'ai bifurqué vers les sciences sociales en intégrant une troisième année de licence Sociologie-Sciences politiques à l'Université Paris Dauphine. J'ai ensuite poursuivi en master de Science Politique - Politique comparée à l'École de la recherche de Sciences Po, où j'ai choisi d'approfondir en particulier la sociologie politique. Après Sciences Po, j'ai choisi de faire un Master 2 supplémentaire plus professionnalisant à Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, sur la concertation et participation citoyenne. Je travaille aujourd'hui au sein de l'institut d'études Viavoice où je suis chargée d'études qualitatives et quantitatives.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin 

Sophie CETRE, Chef du laboratoire d'économie du risque nucléaire - Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire

Sophie CETRE, Chef du laboratoire d'économie du risque nucléaire - Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire
| Diplômée 2020, Doctorat en Économie

J'ai effectué une thèse en économie à Sciences Po de 2016 à 2020 portant sur les déterminants des inégalités salariales, du point de vue de la microéconomie appliquée et de l'économie comportementale. J'ai ensuite intégré l'Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire en qualité d'économiste, sur un poste à mi-chemin entre la recherche et les études économiques en support à l'expertise. Je suis à présent chef du laboratoire d'économie du risque nucléaire de l'IRSN.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Hugo DE TARLÉ, Chargé des relations extérieures - Banque de France

Hugo DE TARLÉ, Chargé des relations extérieures - Banque de France | Diplômé 2018, Master en Sociologie

Après avoir obtenu diplôme de Sciences Po, j'ai travaillé pendant un an dans un cabinet de conseil et d'études dans le domaine de l'éducation. Puis j'ai préparé l'agrégation de sciences économiques et sociales dans les ENS parisiennes, et de mon côté, les concours de la Banque de France. A l'issue cette année de préparation, j'ai intégré la Direction des Activités Fiduciaires de la Banque de France où j'assure les relations européennes sur les sujets en liens les espèces (billets et pièces).

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Julie LENOIR, Ingénieure développeuse informatique - Institut national d'études démographiques (Ined)

Julie LENOIR, Ingénieure développeuse informatique - Institut national d'études démographiques (Ined) | Diplômée 2018, Master in Economics  

Julie Lenoir est diplômée d'un master de recherche en Economie de l'École de la Recherche de Sciences Po Paris. Elle a rejoint l’Institut national d’études démographiques (Ined) en 2020 en tant qu'ingénieure développeuse informatique et travaille à la fois sur la programmation des outils de collecte et de suivi des enquêtes ainsi que sur l’optimisation des processus de diffusions des données et métadonnées.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Gabriele MARIANI, Research Executive - Kantar Public

Gabriele MARIANI, Research Executive - Kantar Public | Diplômé 2021, Master en Sociologie

Passionate about social research and political science, after graduating from the Master in Sociology at the Sciences Po Research School in 2021, I have joined Kantar Public as an intern within their Paris-based think tank, the Centre Kantar sur le Futur de l'Europe. Following this stimulating experience, I was hired at Kantar Public Belgium, working on public opinion evidence and policy evaluation studies for the European Union and other Bruxelles-based international organizations, NGOs, academic and research institutions.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Hugo PLASSAIS, Apprenti rédacteur affaires économiques - Business France

Hugo PLASSAIS, Apprenti rédacteur affaires économiques - Business France | Diplômé 2020, Master en Science politique, relations internationales

J’ai réalisé ma recherche à Sciences Po sur la Chine et le maintien de la paix dans les livres blanc de la défense. J’ai ensuite travaillé dans un centre de recherche du MEAE à Prague, en même temps que je contribuais à l’écriture d’un documentaire sur l’économie chinoise. En rentrant, j’ai été analyste quelques mois à l’École militaire avant de rejoindre Business France où je rédige des notes sur les questions d’attractivité économique.

=> Voir sa page Linkedin

Justine SOBIECK, Senior Consultante - KYU Associés

Justine  SOBIECK,  Senior Consultante -  KYU Associés | Diplômée en 2016, Master en Sociologie

Consultante senior dans le cabinet KYU, je travaille depuis 6 ans dans le domaine de l'emploi-formation (études prospective, AMO, certification, data, diagnostics et audits...) et développe de nombreuses activités au sein de mon cabinet (pilotage d'équipes et de projet, management, communication, veille réglementaire...).

Voir sa page Linkedin 

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Nour AL SHEIKH HASSAN, Class of 2019

Project Officer at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science, Programme in Comparative Politics
  • Nour AL SHEIKH HASSAN | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (2019)Nour AL SHEIKH HASSAN | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (2019)

Can you tell us about your academic background?

After obtaining my scientific baccalaureate, I did a year of literary preparatory classes before taking the Sciences Po competitive entrance exam and enrolling at Sciences Po Rennes. During my bachelor's degree, I specialised in social sciences and did several professional and linguistic internships in the Middle East. Afterwards, I joined a dual Master's programme in political science research on the Middle East / Maghreb region, run by Sciences Po and INALCO (*). I graduated in 2019.     

How did your interest in political science begin?

I am of Syrian origin, and I grew up with an interest in the geopolitics of the Middle East.
I wanted to study the region I come from, which in the West is mostly portrayed in a negative, caricatured and partial way. This is where my attraction to political science, and social sciences in general, comes from, as they are essential fields of study for anyone who wants to understand the complexity of the world. Political science provides edifying frameworks for analysing the functioning of our societies, so we can understand each other. Beyond intellectual reflection, political science also enables action because it is by understanding the ins and outs of a crisis or conflict that we can advocate for sustainable and effective solutions.

What were the main stages in the construction of your career plans?

During my years of study, the Syrian crisis led me to become involved in the refugee issue, particularly from the point of view of women. While I was profoundly enriched by the teachings of the School of Research (formerly the Doctoral School), as well as the work I did on my research thesis, I realised that I did not want to continue in the field of research. I specialised in the sociology of migration and gender studies, and my professional roles have always related to these fields. Today, I am happy to have joined the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in France as a project officer on refugee participation. This has allowed me to reconnect with my preferred subject.       

What have been the contributions of your education to the position you hold today?  

My political science research background has allowed me to sharpen my critical and analytical skills. Intellectual rigour is essential for research work, and I have developed a multidisciplinary and complex understanding of the subjects I work on, both of which are very valuable assets. Research, especially fieldwork and data collection, requires excellent interpersonal, adaptive, and listening skills, which are extremely important qualities in the professional field. My training at Sciences Po also allowed me to acquire a work methodology, particularly through the mastery of qualitative research tools, that I re-use for each of my roles.

Would you have any advice to give to a student who wants to go into the field in which you work today?

Having worked in the social sector and now in the humanitarian field, I think it is essential to always distance yourself from and maintain a critical perspective of your work. This is why it is important to have developed, upstream, a theoretical and empirical knowledge of the subjects one wishes to engage with. It is also essential to question your own position as a future professional and to practise humility. In the social and humanitarian sector, the relationship between professionals and the end user must be one of reciprocity: the people concerned are the most likely to know their needs and must be an integral part of project development. This is how we can ensure the relevance of a project in which the people concerned determine their own emancipation. 

=> (*): This double degree (Sciences Po / INALCO) is no longer offered at the Research School.

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=> See all the Graduates' Portraits

[ March 2022 ]

 

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Marie DURRIEU

reçoit le 2ème prix de l’Institut des hautes études de défense nationale (l'IHEDN)
  • Marie DURRIEU | 2ème prix de l’IHEDN 2021Marie DURRIEU | 2ème prix de l’IHEDN 2021

pour son mémoire de master en science politique, mention relations internationales « L’humiliation : la variable oubliée des négociations internationales les cas des Accords d’Oslo et des Accords de Vienne sur le nucléaire iranien » soutenu en 2020, et mené sous la direction de Frédéric CHARILLON, Professeur des universités à  l'université Clermont-Auvergne.

Nous lui adressons toutes nos félicitations.

Son mémoire de recherche a fait l’objet d’une publication : « Du conflit israélo-palestinein au nucléaire
iranien : l'humiliation, la variable oubliée des négociations »
 aux éditions de l’Harmattan en partenariat avec l’@iREMMO en septembre 2021.

Marie DURRIEU est actuellement doctorante à l’Université Clermont-Auvergne associée à l’Institut de recherche stratégique de l’École militaire (IRSEM) et enseignante à Sciences Po et à l’Université de Clermont Ferrand Auvergne.

Résumé :

« Du conflit israélo-palestinein au nucléaire iranien : l'humiliation, la variable oubliée des négociations », Marie DURRIEULes accords israélo-palestiniens de 1993 et l'accord sur le nucléaire iranien de 2015 représentaient un espoir pour la paix, rapidement déçu par l'échec de leur mise en oeuvre qui a replongé le Moyen-Orient dans l'incertitude. À l'heure où la région est embrasée, où les tensions resurgissent, et où le nucléaire iranien est au sommet de l'agenda diplomatique, il devient urgent de comprendre les mécanismes qui bloquent la résolution de ces conflits. Cet ouvrage s'intéresse à une variable trop souvent oubliée : l'humiliation. A-t-elle un rôle dans l'impossible résolution de ces conflits ? Par la diplomatie, nous savons faire la paix avec un ennemi, mais peut-on faire la paix avec celui qui nous a humiliés ?

 

Dernière publication : Marie Durrieu : « Nous avons été humiliés » : le discours du Kremlin sur les années 1990 et la crise russo-ukrainienne, in The Conversation (27 février 2022)

_____________________

Les prix scientifiques de l’Institut des hautes études de défense nationale (IHEDN) ont pour but de mettre en valeur la recherche consacrée notamment aux questions de défense, de sécurité, de relations internationales, de politique étrangère, d’armement et économie de défense.
Ils permettent également de favoriser les liens entre l’IHEDN et le monde universitaire.
Créés en 1998, ils récompensent chaque année des chercheurs en master II recherche et en doctorat, dont les travaux, soutenus dans l’année, font progresser les connaissances dans le domaine des sciences humaines et sociales. En savoir plus

[ Mars 2021 ]

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Marie DURRIEU, Class of 2020

Teacher and Associate Doctoral Student at the Institute for Strategic Research of the Ecole Militaire (IRSEM) | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science, Programme in International Relations
  • Marie DURRIEU | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (Class of 2020)Marie DURRIEU | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (Class of 2020)

Can you tell us about your academic background?

I was in my penultimate year of high school, in the science stream at the Lycée Français de Barcelone, when I learned about the existence of Sciences Po’s regional campuses, which combine international openness, a multidisciplinary approach, and dynamic student life. I had reservations about leaving the hard sciences for the social sciences, but the discovery of Sciences Po and the Euro-American programme in Reims convinced me to make the change.

I spent two richly educational years on the Reims campus, discovering Science Po’s diverse disciplines, after which international relations caught my attention. Before definitively choosing my Master's degree, I did an intense and unusual third year at the University of Texas in Austin, where I chose to study philosophy – a discipline I love and which I had put aside after high school. Eventually, I realised that I did indeed want to focus on international relations.

I hesitated for a long time between a Master's degree at Sciences Po’s Paris School of International Affairs or a Master's degree at the School of Research, which offers a Political Science curriculum with a specialisation in international relations. The research path ultimately seemed the way to combine my vocation – international affairs – with my interest in philosophical conceptual analysis. For two years, I followed the Master's programme at the Sciences Po School of Research, which combines learning about social science research and methodology, acquiring a foundation in political science, and deepening one’s understanding of international affairs.

In addition, I was required to write a research paper as part of my Master's degree. I chose to work on the role of humiliation in international relations, under the supervision of Professor Frédéric Charillon. I was able to examine a subject little explored within the discipline, to conduct fieldwork in Israel and Palestine, and to write a thesis that was subsequently published in book form by L'Harmattan (*). It was an exciting experience that was pivotal for my subsequent career.

Once you’ve tasted research, you’ll never leave it. When I entered the Master's programme at the School of Research I wasn’t aiming to do a PhD, but I was so passionate about my subject that I ended up deciding to pursue a doctorate. I’m currently in the second year of my PhD and I’m a contractual doctoral student associated with the Institute for Strategic Research at the Military School (IRSEM).

What did your years of study at the Sciences Po School of Research bring you?

For me, the School of Research was a turning point on several levels.

First, during my initial three years at Sciences Po I gained a very broad base of knowledge and skills in the social sciences. However, I felt the need to specialise and go deeper. By enrolling in the School of Research, I fulfilled this desire in two ways. On the one hand, the teaching allowed me to enhance my understanding of certain ideas and concepts in Political Science and International Relations. On the other hand, I gained in-depth knowledge of research methods and tools that now enable me to independently study certain international issues. For example, since leaving the School of Research, I have published several articles analysing international news events – my ability to analyse international affairs stems largely from the training I received.

Secondly, when I joined the School of Research, I didn’t want to do a PhD (I wasn't sure where I was going to end up after graduation!). However, I’m currently in the second year of my thesis; it is therefore clear that the School of Research helped me to find my way. I am extremely grateful to the teachers of this course, especially Professor Guillaume Devin who directed the Master’s course and Professor Frédéric Charillon who supervised my thesis, for helping me to find my vocation.

What memories do you have of your school, your class, your teachers?

I feel that the School of Research is a special little microcosm at Sciences Po. Research is a path that is often misunderstood by those who don’t choose it, and so the School of Research is a small, self-contained universe. It's a world where theoretical debates take place at the coffee machine and lunches are animated by discussions on the latest books we’ve read. Our teachers wrote our textbooks and lead the conferences we attend. It’s a universe where we’re constantly trying to understand the world around us and how it works – one that is very often stimulating and sometimes unnerving.

What is your current role?

I’m currently a PhD student and teacher.

I’m working on a thesis exploring the function of humiliation in international relations, particularly in the Middle East. I work under the co-supervision of Professors Frédéric Charillon and Thomas Lindemann, at the Centre Michel de l'Hospital research laboratory. My doctoral contract is financed by the DGRIS (department of the Ministry of Defence). I am, therefore, an associate doctoral student at the Institute for Strategic Research at the Military School.

In addition, I combine my research with multiple teaching activities. I teach several courses in Political Science and International Relations on the Reims campus. It is especially meaningful for me to be on the other side of the same classroom my academic journey began. I was in these students’ shoes not too long ago and I’m thrilled to be able to share my passion with them. I also teach an introductory lecture course in Political Science at the University of Clermont Ferrand Auvergne – a completely different experience, but just as influential and enriching. In addition, I have several other teaching projects coming up, including a course that combines negotiation simulation and International Relations Theory that I will be offering for the first time this summer at the Sciences Po Summer School. I would never have imagined teaching, but actually it’s an activity I find extremely stimulating and I recommend it to anyone who is embarking on the solitary journey of a doctorate.

(*) Publications 

Marie Durrieu : Du conflit israélo-palestinien au nucléaire iranien : l'humiliation, la variable oubliée des négociations. Collection Bibliothèque de l'iReMMO - Maghreb, Moyen Orient - Edition l'Harmattan (Septembre 2021)

Marie Durrieu : « Nous avons été humiliés » : le discours du Kremlin sur les années 1990 et la crise russo-ukrainienne, Article in The Conversation (27 février 2022)

Learn more

=> See all the Graduates' Portraits

[ March 2022 ]

 

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Recruitment of a PHD Researcher in cyberlaw

  • Jardin du 13U © Caroline Maufroid / Sciences PoJardin du 13U © Caroline Maufroid / Sciences Po

The Sciences Po Law School is looking for a doctoral researcher in law and the digital environment as part of the New Digital Rule of Law project funded by the McCourt Institute.

In the frame of a research project on The New Digital Rule of Law, funded by the McCourt Institute, The Sciences Po Law School is offering a Doctoral position in the field of law and the digital environment. The researcher will be hosted by the Sciences Po Law School for three year, starting in September 2022. He/she will be expected to carry out a postdoctoral research within the Law School’s New Digital Rule of Law project.

The McCourt research project aims at studying the legal governance/regulation of the Internet and digital technologies and at investigatingthe necessary role of law in current internet evolution. Amongst the questions relevant to the projects: How can the values and rights needed to sustain democracy and the common good be upheld and ensured in our digital world? What is the role of the law in doing so? What is the value of constitutional law concepts for a digital rule of law? How to govern AI to make it compatible with democracy? How do code and design interact with regulation in the digital age? How do infrastructures govern and how to govern infrastructures to address data inequality and shape a less concentrated web? The goal of the project is to understand what kinds of new concepts and regulatory mechanisms need to be devised to face these challenges.

Sciences Po Law School welcomes doctoral project applications related to issues of the rule of law in the digital environment in a vast array of fields: constitutional law, legal jurisprudence, AI and algorithms, innovation, the regulation of the web… The selection will be based on the excellence of the candidate and on the originality ad relevance of the PhD proposal.

ELIGIBILITY

The program is open to students holding the equivalent of a Master degree from a French or a foreign institution, preferably in law . The candidate will be expected to have some knowledge of the scholarship of cyberspace law and to be fluent in English, both in speech and writing. French language would be a plus, as well as any experience in the research topics developed above.

WORK ENVIRONMENT

Sciences Po Law School offers an ambitious doctoral program, located in the Sciences Po School of Research. Doctoral candidates are encouraged to pursue critical and rigorous research in various fields of law to amass technical as well as theoretical knowledge. Our doctoral candidates are well-versed in diverse methods and perspectives, open to multidisciplinary approaches to law, as well as to diverse legal cultures.

The doctoral program of the Law School provides PhD candidates with excellent research facilities (workstation, access to Sciences Po library, etc). PhD candidates also benefit from a net monthly amount of approximately 1500€ for the three years of the PhD curriculum). Academic events at the Law School are extremely accessible and students enrolled in the program are regularly associated to the scientific events organized by SPLS scientific community (workshops, seminars...).

ADMISSION PROCESS

Please submit your online application by the 1st of May 2022 at the latest (for admissions' results mid-July 2022). Pay attention: this deadline for the McCourt PhD Program is sooner than the deadline for the general application to Sciences Po PhD program.

The application is available exclusively online. See the list of documents to attach to your application.

In parallel to applying online, please send to severine.dusollier@sciencespo.fr - open in new window">severine.dusollier@sciencespo.fr by the 1st of May 2022 an email with the header “ PHD application McCourt”, indicating that you are applying for the McCourt PhD scholarship and that you have completed your online application.

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Juliette GUILBAUD, Class of 2021

Cybersecurity and Digital Trust Analyst at Wavestone | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science, Programme in International Relations
  • Juliette GUILBAUD | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (2021)Juliette GUILBAUD | Graduated from the Master in Policital Science (2021)

Can you tell us about your academic background?

After obtaining the literary baccalaureate, I did a bachelor's degree in political science at Sciences Po Le Havre, which ended with an exchange year at Sofia University in Tokyo. I became acquainted with the major concepts of political theory and explored international relations in East Asia in particular. As I was planning to continue my studies with a research thesis and I wanted to learn methods that would allow me to independently explore the subjects of my choice, I then joined the master's degree in International Relations offered by the School of Research. The two years of study were rich in encounters and I produced a dissertation focusing on the dissemination of standards for the protection of personal data online in the European Union and Japan, under the supervision of Delphine Allès.

What did your years of study at the Sciences Po School of Research (formerly the Doctoral School) bring you?

The two years of study were very intense and allowed me to acquire a more complete vision of the discipline of international relations while developing research skills.
The curriculum encourages us to read a lot and the teachers gave us a lot of freedom in the choice of subjects, which allowed me to explore themes that particularly resonated with me such as the way in which standards are disseminated, and the influence of emotions on actors’ behaviours.
The work of writing the dissertation allowed me to acquire a scientific approach, to demonstrate critical thinking, and to be autonomous, all the while benefiting from my supervisor’s welcome guidance. It was also a moment that pushed me to question my career orientation and the sectors that might interest me at the end of my studies.

Which teacher or teaching has had the greatest impact on you?

There are several teachers who have had a particular impact on me throughout my studies. As far as my years at the Undergraduate College are concerned, I will particularly remember the history courses taught by Meha Priyadarshini. She encouraged us to explore history by examining specific focal points of the periods studied, an approach that proved to be exciting and rich in discoveries and which also relied heavily on observation and independent research. I particularly remember a lecture on Zheng He's expeditions and the diplomatic practices employed during these voyages.
It would be harder to choose a specific master's teacher because the courses were often very complementary and very well structured; the quality of the courses was consistent and everything was relevant.

What memories do you have of your school, your class, your teachers?

Although part of the master's programme was taught remotely, I benefited from a small class size which allowed me to meet inspiring people with a wide range of interests and aspirations. This is definitely one of the strengths of this master's degree: I have excellent memories of the debates in class, whether on zoom or over a drink with the other students, all of whom were kind, open to discussion and passionate about their subject. I learned a lot from them and this social aspect of the master's programme, which the teachers encouraged, was very fulfilling.
The teaching staff were also very present and constantly pushed us to question ourselves, to explore international relations further, and to demonstrate critical thinking. Above all, it's a master's degree where you read a lot and spend time talking about what you've read, a habit that remains after you graduate.

What is your current role?

I currently operate cybersecurity consulting missions for a digital transformation consulting firm. It’s a challenging job, for which you need a strong sense of engagement, and it also requires regular monitoring of current and future issues and challenges. I have become familiar with the more technical aspects of securing an information system, something that is not necessarily possible with a political training alone. I have, for example, written safety guidelines and policies for a health care organisation, worked on a compliance programme for a European directive, and I’m currently carrying out an assignment for a humanitarian organization.

What were the main stages in the construction of your career plans?

First of all, I began asking questions about the cybersecurity issues raised by the increasing digitisation of our lives as result of my personal readings and due to current events such as the Cambridge Analytica scandal and the “sunburst” attack. This led me to focus on these issues as the subject of my master's thesis, with a particular focus on the protection of personal data online.
A research internship in energy geopolitics, one of the aspects of which was related to the security of supply and therefore partly to cybersecurity issues, further strengthened my interest in this path.
Most importantly, as I was completing my master's thesis, I noticed that it had been particularly difficult for me to study how actors take ownership of the standards relating to the protection of personal data online. I studied the emergence of the standards, and their dissemination, but ultimately, I was able to study very little of how they are taken on board by the actors at the operational level. This made me want to explore this aspect on my own, and consulting quickly became the best way to do so. This desire was coupled with the desire to develop a better technical knowledge of cybersecurity issues, in order to develop a more complete vision of the challenges facing our societies.  

What have been the contributions of your studies to the position you hold today? 

My master's thesis allowed me to acquire solid knowledge of the main issues relating to cybersecurity. It also reinforced my belief that working to protect users is essential as our societies become more and more digitised.
I think that my employer was sensitive to my personal motivations and today I am working, for example, to facilitate compliance with a European standard, an assignment that echoes my research work for my master's degree.
In addition, a number of qualities cultivated within the School of Research are particularly useful in the consulting profession, such as the ability to find information efficiently and to process a large amount of data, and having a good knowledge of international organisations.

Would you have any advice to give to a student who wants to go into the field in which you work today?

First of all, I think it's worth remembering that students trained in research are valued in consulting, and this is even more true in cybersecurity where autonomy is valued. The master's thesis can be made conspicuous to recruiters and is a gateway for students who may not have an engineering background or may not have followed specific courses in cybersecurity.
Another thing to keep in mind is that the cybersecurity industry is changing and constantly evolving. It is essential to keep abreast of the major trends and future challenges that will arise in order to better understand them and respond appropriately. I think that to flourish in this field and find your place in it, you have to cultivate an everyday sense of curiosity, seek to learn about innovations and don't hesitate to go and ask questions of people involved in the cybersecurity business so that they can tell you about their experiences.

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=> See all the Graduates' Portraits

[ March 2022 ]

 

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Insights on the War in Ukraine: Sciences Po's Response

  • Crédits @Shutterstock / Golub OleksiiCrédits @Shutterstock / Golub Oleksii

Over the course of the last few days, all eyes have been turned towards Ukraine and the war being waged on the orders of Vladimir Putin. Aggression on this scale, in direct violation of international law, and the unbridled disregard for the value of human life that have been witnessed over the past few days has left many feeling at a loss, unsure of how to process the events that are unfolding on the global stage.

In addition to our efforts to assist students to evacuate the zone of conflict and to provide material and psychological support to students, researchers, and professors in exile or who are affected by this war, Sciences Po is  strongly committed to providing a scientific  perspective and concrete intellectual frameworks with which to understand our current moment. As an international research university, Sciences Po pledges to research, teach, and study the major issues of this region.

With this in mind, Sciences Po will hold a series of lectures featuring specialists from our academic community and public figures. This will allow a rational and scientific analysis of the facts to be shared through the prism of the human and social sciences.

Below, you will find an evolving list of the Sciences Po events. We will continue to add events in the coming days and weeks.

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#ScPoUkraine

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