Bernardino Leon Reyes

Phone: +447547784839 - bernardino.leonreyes@sciencespo.fr
 Bernardino Leon Reyes is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Sciences Po’s Centre for International Studies (CERI). He is undertaking his doctoral studies as a researcher for GUARDINT, a 3-year-long project that analyses the limitations and potentials of intelligence agencies’ oversight mechanisms, with the support of a full doctoral Fellowship. His research looks specifically at the “everyday” accountability processes that scrutinize intelligence agencies beyond the state and the strategies that actors follow to unveil, inter alia, recurrent violations of human rights and mass surveillance by these agencies.

Bernardino holds an MSc in International Relations Theory from the London School of Economics and Political Science, an MSc in the Anthropology of Politics, Violence and Crime from University College London and a BA in Philosophy and Sociology from Sorbonne Université. He has previously been a “La Caixa” Fellow (one of Spain’s most prestigious scholarships) at UCL Anthropology, where he convened the Reading and Research Group (RRG) “Anthropology of/in International Relations”. He has also worked as a member of Millennium: Journal of International Studies’ editorial board, as an intern at the Delma Institute (a security think tank based in Abu Dhabi), and as a teaching assistant in Political Philosophy at Colegio Estudio in Madrid.

His research interests revolve around critical (in)security studies, the anthropology of political violence (in particular revolutions and genocide) and the sociology of science in IR Theory. He is especially stimulated by the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, James Scott, George Marcus, Christopher C. Taylor and the Comaroffs.
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Thesis

“Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?”: An Anthropological Study of “Everyday” Intelligence Oversight

Work in Progress

The oversight of intelligence agencies, critical (in)security studies, anthropology of political violence, IR Theory