Poor indicators make poor policy

In his new book Measuring Tomorrow: Accounting for Well-Being, Resilience, and Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century, OCFE* researcher Eloi Laurent challenges existing economic indicators and invites us to rethink the economy from top to bottom. We asked Dr Laurent more.

In your new book, Measuring Tomorrow, growth and gross domestic product (or GDP) get a bad name. Why?

Because “growth”, that is the growth of GDP, captures only a tiny fraction of what goes on in complex human societies. It tracks some but not all of economic well-being (saying nothing about fundamental issues such as income inequality), it fails to account for most dimensions of well-being (think about the importance of health, education or happiness for your own quality of life), and it completely ignores sustainability, which basically means well-being in the future as well as the present (imagine your quality of life in a world where the temperature is six degrees higher).

My point is that because well-being (human fulfillment), resilience (resistance to shocks) and sustainability (caring about the future) have been overlooked by mainstream economics in the last three decades, our economic world has been mismanaged and our prosperity is now threatened by inequality and ecological crises. Understanding how the things that matter to human beings can be properly accounted for is the first step towards valuing and taking care of what really counts.

Economics, as I understand it, is precisely the discipline that measures what really matters for human beings, then designs incentives and provides policy makers with tools to shape human behaviours and attitudes so that societies have a chance of reaching the goals they set themselves. At its best, economics measures what counts and provides societies with the means to make it count. Among the most powerful of these are good indicators.

Can you give an example of how conventional economic indicators can mislead policy makers?

Take the US economy today. One of the things Donald Trump likes to brag about is the record-breaking mood his election triggered on stock markets. Markets were indeed driven up all through 2017 by the prospect of large increases in corporate profits, themselves conditioned on considerable federal tax cuts, which are eventually likely to boost growth. But stock markets, profits and growth are the holy trinity of economic mismeasurement.

Consider another US trinity—inequality, health and trust—and the picture changes radically. Recent data show that income inequality is higher today than it was during the Gilded Age and is relentlessly fracturing the American society; that Americans in large numbers have been “dying of despair” since the late 1990s while the economy (not to mention corporate profits) was growing; and that the level of trust in Congress is now three-and-a-half times lower than in the mid-1970s with political polarisation at an all-time high, while GDP per capita roughly doubled over the same period. There is every reason to believe that, once enacted, the Republican tax bill that the US Congress passed last year will degrade the country on all three counts while further increasing corporate profits, stock market indices and GDP growth.

Quite simply, growth, profits and stock markets cannot help us understand let alone solve either of the major crises that mark the early twenty-first century: inequality (the growing gap between the haves and the have-nots) and ecology (the alarming degradation of the climate, ecosystems and biodiversity that threatens human well-being).

But alternative indicators themselves are debatable, aren’t they?

Of course they are and they should be! We have plenty of pointed critiques of GDP but we also need to address the limitations of alternative indicators. Dozens of these are created or updated each year, but their conceptual and empirical foundations are sometimes obscure or weak. What exactly do they measure? How well do they measure it? This book is not only a (necessarily partial) guide to alternative indicators, but a guide to understanding their meaning, accuracy, and usefulness.

So how can we accelerate what you call in the book the “well-being and sustainability transition”?

This transition is actually already under way—it is part of the “Great Transition” which we explore with Marie-Laure Djelic and Dominique Cardon in a new class at the School of Management and Innovation. Economic research is devoting far more attention to the question of inequality, while sustainability analysis has made valuable progress in recent years. To take just two examples, US scholars and (some) policy makers increasingly recognise the importance of paying attention to inequality rather than just growth, while China’s leaders acknowledge that sustainability is a much better policy target than explosive economic expansion. But progress toward well-being and sustainability should indeed be accelerated.

First, we need to engage in a transition in values to change behaviours and attitudes. We live in a world where many dimensions of human well-being already have a value and often a price; it is the pluralism of value that can therefore protect those dimensions from the dictatorship of the single price.

Next we need to understand that the challenge is not just to interpret or even analyse this new economic world, but to change it. We therefore need to understand how indicators of well-being and sustainability can become performative and not just descriptive. This can be done by integrating indicators into policy through representative democracy, regulatory democracy and democratic activism. If private and public decision makers apply them carefully, well-being and sustainability indicators can foster genuine progress.

Finally, we need to build tangible transitions at the local level. Well-being is best measured where it is actually experienced. Localities (cities, regions) are more agile than states, not to mention international institutions, and better able to bring well-being indicators into play and translate them into new policies. We need what the late Elinor Ostrom called a “polycentric transition,” where each level of government seizes the well-being and sustainability transition as an opportunity. There is so much exciting work to be done!

Eloi Laurent, Measuring Tomorrow: Accounting for Well-Being, Resilience, and Sustainability in the Twenty-First Century, Princeton University Press

*The Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques (OFCE), or French Economic Observatory, is a Sciences Po research unit.

Read more

La démocratie en clair-obscur

La démocratie en clair-obscur

Par Olivier Dabène (CERI). À quelques semaines d’intervalle, le Venezuela et la Colombie ont tenu des élections présidentielles que tout oppose. Le 20 mai, au Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro a mis en scène sa réélection à l’issue d’un simulacre de scrutin que l’opposition avait boycotté. La participation électorale n’a pas atteint les 50 %, alors qu’elle avait flirté avec les 80 % en 2013, et le candidat chaviste a été crédité de 67 % des voix. La Colombie, de son côté, a connu ses premières élections sans violence dans un contexte inédit de post-conflit.

Lire la suite

"Montrer la révolution entrepreneuriale au féminin"

Diplômée du master en communication de Sciences Po, Nora Poggi est la réalisatrice du film documentaire « She Started It ». Projeté plus de 300 fois, entre autres aux universités de Harvard, de Columbia, de Yale… mais aussi à la Banque Mondiale, à Disney, ou encore chez Google et dans de nombreux festivals, ce film suit le parcours de cinq jeunes femmes qui ont lancé leur start-up dans la Silicon Valley. Interview avec la réalisatrice à l’occasion d’une conférence à Sciences Po.

Lire la suite
Un nouveau master en marketing et luxe

Un nouveau master en marketing et luxe

À la rentrée 2019, l’Ecole du management et de l’innovation ouvre un nouveau master intitulé « Master Marketing : New Luxury & Art de Vivre ». Entièrement en anglais, il a pour vocation d’accueillir 25 étudiants français et internationaux. Les participants auront des parcours très divers. Des connaissances préalables en marketing ne sont pas nécessaires.

Lire la suite
Réussissez le Bac avec Sciences Po !

Réussissez le Bac avec Sciences Po !

Vous révisez le Bac ? Sciences Po vous accompagne dans la dernière ligne droite avec ses tutoriels en vidéo. Dans “Sciences Po passe le Bac”, nos profs planchent sur un sujet et donnent leurs conseils pour le traiter. Dans nos fiches méthodo, on vous explique comment éviter le hors-sujet, lire une carte ou encore travailler en temps limité. De quoi se préparer aux épreuves en toute sérénité.

Lire la suite
« Le campus s'inscrit dans notre vision du grand paris »

« Le campus s'inscrit dans notre vision du grand paris »

Adjoint à la mairie de Paris, chargé de l’urbanisme, de l’architecture, des projets du Grand Paris, du développement économique et de l’attractivité, Jean-Louis Missika a suivi le projet du campus de l’Artillerie depuis ses prémisses. Il raconte comment la Ville de Paris s’est impliquée dans le dossier. L’enjeu ? Le déploiement, au cœur de l’espace urbain, d’un campus symbolisant le rôle prépondérant que les établissements universitaires sont appelés à jouer dans la métropole de demain.

Lire la suite
Mieux prévenir la criminalité

Mieux prévenir la criminalité

Comment prévenir la criminalité ? L’incarcération permet-elle de réduire durablement la récidive ? Roberto Galbiati, chercheur à Sciences Po, se penche sur “l’économie du crime”. Il propose d’ouvrir la boîte noire des politiques d’incarcération et de lutte contre la récidive en France, en Italie et aux États-Unis. Il présentera les enseignements de ses travaux le 4 juillet prochain lors d’un colloque co-organisé par le Laboratoire interdisciplinaire d’évaluation des politiques publiques de Sciences Po, en partenariat avec France Stratégie.

Lire la suite
La cogestion

La cogestion

En mai et juin, Sciences Po dévoile des documents et archives inédits sur les événements de mai 68 survenus dans ses murs. Photos, témoignages vidéos… L’ambition de cette série d’articles est de redonner la parole aux acteurs, de saisir l’événement sur le vif et de comprendre la parole de 68 autant que son contenu. Septième épisode de “Ça s’est passé…” : le 17 juin 1968, le statut de cogestion, élaboré par le comité paritaire des études, est voté par les étudiants. Il sert de matrice à la réforme des statuts de l’IEP de janvier 1969.

Lire la suite
Core : un autre enseignement de l'économie est possible

Core : un autre enseignement de l'économie est possible

Enseigner l’économie comme si les 30 dernières années avaient vraiment eu lieu. Et (re)donner le goût pour cette discipline aux étudiants. Telles sont les ambitions de CORE, un nouveau cours et son manuel élaborés par des professeurs d’économie du monde entier, parmi lesquels Yann Algan à Sciences Po. Objectif de ce cours : montrer que l’économie, jugée souvent trop abstraite et théorique, peut contribuer à résoudre les problèmes et les crises du monde réel.

Lire la suite
Le mai des professeurs et des chercheurs

Le mai des professeurs et des chercheurs

En mai et juin, Sciences Po dévoile des documents inédits sur les événements de mai 68 survenus dans ses murs. Photos, témoignages, archives… L’ambition de cette série d’articles est de redonner la parole aux acteurs, de saisir l’événement sur le vif et de comprendre la parole de 68 autant que son contenu. Sixième épisode de “Ça s’est passé…”, le 8 juin 1968, les enseignants de Sciences Po se réunissent pour la seconde fois en Assemblée générale. Leur action, conjointe à celle des étudiants, contribue à révolutionner leur statut au sein de l’école.

Lire la suite
Le mai de l’administration

Le mai de l’administration

En mai et juin, Sciences Po dévoile, à travers une série d’articles, des documents inédits sur les événements de mai 68 survenus dans ses murs. Photos, témoignages, archives… L’ambition est de redonner la parole aux acteurs, de saisir l’événement sur le vif et de comprendre la parole de 68 autant que son contenu. Cinquième épisode de “Ça s’est passé…” : le 21 mai 1968, la direction, ayant pris acte de l’occupation de Sciences Po, cherche à composer avec le mouvement étudiant.

Lire la suite