Emmanuel Macron, French president-elect, Class of 2001

Emmanuel Macron was 21 years old when he arrived at Sciences Po. After three years of preparatory classes in the arts section at lycée Henri IV and two failed attempts at the entrance exams for the École Normale Supérieure, he is said to have gone to Sciences Po to “lick his wounds,” perhaps even “with a certain spirit of revenge”. In any case, he was recommended by his prépa professors in his application for Sciences Po as a “likeable” candidate “who inspires confidence”, and an “enthusiastic and lively personality”. His plans for the future were still wide open, but thoughts of a career in higher education, “possibly abroad”, prompted him to choose the International section (one of four programmes offered at the time).[1]

“Public service” and political philosophy

Macron’s time at Sciences Po, though often reduced to a one-line mention between his preparatory studies in the Latin Quarter and his years at the École nationale d’administration (ENA), was in fact a more decisive period than it may seem. First of all, for his choice of a public career. At the start of the third year of what was then a three-year degree programme, he swapped sections to join the Public Service section. He spread this third year over two years so that, in parallel, he could complete his studies in philosophy at the University of Nanterre. There, he earned an honour’s and a Master’s degree with dissertations on two political philosophers, Machiavelli and Hegel. To round out his timetable, the busy young man became editorial assistant to Paul Ricœur for his book La mémoire, l’histoire, l’oubli, published by Seuil in 2000.

“Obvious aptitude”

This didn’t get in the way of him being a brilliant student at Sciences Po, and he just kept improving. Was this a sign that he had made the right choice with the Public Service section, or that spreading his courses over two years meant he could better reconcile all his academic commitments? In any case, the year he earned his Sciences Po degree, he got the top mark in his “Advanced Economics”, “Political Issues” and “Public Finance” lectures. The assessment by his professor for the “Social Protection” course— “a brilliant pupil”, “very mature” with “original and well-constructed thinking” and an “obvious knowledge of the subject”—set the tone. Most professors sung his praises, particularly stressing his “obvious aptitude for public speaking, as much in substance as in form”. His involvement in drama since his high school years, complemented by workshops at Cours Florent drama school, was suitably appreciated at Sciences Po, the university where eloquence is king.

Meetings that count

Young Macron clearly liked to talk, but not to hold forth. “He was the best student in my lecture,” recalls Ali Baddou, who was one of his teachers, “but I especially remember that he loved to ask questions, to discuss things.” The Sciences Po appariteurs—campus porters in constant contact with the students—have a similar recollection: “he was close to us and would always come over to talk.” Another of his professors, historian François Dosse (who introduced him to Paul Ricœur), stressed “his ability to summarise and link different classes and reuse the material”² and that he was “constantly leading debate in the group, always at an excellent level”.

The conversation begun at Sciences Po with his professor Jean-Marc Borello has been going on for seventeen years. This social economy entrepreneur (SOS group, 15,000 employees) is now one of the pillars of En marche! The same is true of Macron’s former classmate Aurélien Lechevallier, with whom he studied for the ENA entrance exams and who is now his international affairs advisor; of Benjamin Griveaux (class of 1999), now spokesperson of En Marche; and not to forget his close friend, economist Marc Ferraci, now his economic advisor. These connections and friendships have obviously lasted longer than his passing interest in Jean-Pierre Chevènement’s movement. Macron attended the party conference of the Mouvement des Citoyens in Perpignan in 1998 and in 2000 he interned in the office of George Sarre, mayor of the 11th arrondissement and a close supporter of Chevènement. “The adventure was to end there,” writes Nicolas Prissette in his book on Macron.¹

“Moral elegance” and “a very friendly spirit”

His relationship with Sciences Po, on the other hand, has never ended. Fresh out of ENA, and “while the other members of the Inspection Générale des Finances traditionally return to give economics classes at the Republic’s elite schools,” writes François-Xavier Bourmaud, “he chose to teach ‘general knowledge’ at Sciences Po”.[2] A few years later, Macron would show himself to be equally generous with his talents as an orator for the next generation of Sciences Po students: he was guest of honour at the 2015 graduation ceremony and returned three times in 2016, for the student Gala evening, the Paris School of International Affairs symposium (a debate on Europe) and... the send-off for a retiring appariteur he had befriended.

At Sciences Po, before his mastery of rhetoric had been honed by experience, his enthusiasm and aptitude for writing occasionally made him a little too voluble; “too long” appears in red pen on several of his papers. Another (minor) failing of this exemplary student was “a tendency to be too sure of himself”, as one teacher noted, “counterbalanced by a very friendly spirit”. But it is probably the assessment of one of Sciences Po’s main professors of the history and law of states that best reflected young Macron’s potential: an “exceptional student in all respects”; “a lot of intelligence and moral elegance”; “real generosity. An uncommon intellect.” The title of the course the student so excelled in? “The French State and its Reform”.

 

  • [1] Quoted in “L’ambigu Monsieur Macron”, Marc Endeweld, Flammarion (2015), page 50.
  • [2] Macron, l’invité surprise, François-Xavier Bourmaud, l’Archipel (2017)
“Nous devons tous habiter quelque part”

“Nous devons tous habiter quelque part”

Le logement est-il un bien ? Est-il un droit ? De Bombay à Paris, en passant par les grandes villes des États-Unis, Sukriti Issar invite chaque semaine ses étudiants à réfléchir au rôle du logement au sein des villes et dans la vie des individus. Un sujet qui mêle l’intime à l’économie, la sociologie au droit, à la croisée des disciplines.

Lire la suite
Fin du blocage des bâtiments à Sciences Po

Fin du blocage des bâtiments à Sciences Po

Après deux jours de blocage par un groupe d'étudiants mobilisés contre la loi Orientation et réussite des étudiants (ORE), l'occupation du site principal du campus parisien de Sciences Po a pris fin vendredi 20 avril en début d'après-midi. L’accès à tous les bâtiments du campus de Sciences Po à Paris est à nouveau possible pour l’ensemble des étudiants, enseignants et salariés. Les enseignements ont repris normalement dès vendredi après-midi.

Lire la suite
Réconcilier “humain” et

Réconcilier “humain” et "droits de l’homme”

Pour elle, c’est bien plus qu’une vocation. Étudiante en master "Human Rights and Humanitarian Action" à l'École des affaires internationales de Sciences Po (PSIA), Vanessa Topp se rend chaque semaine dans le quartier de la Porte de la Chapelle à Paris à la rencontre des migrants pour leur apporter son soutien. Portrait vidéo d'une jeune femme pour qui étude des droits de l'homme rime avec engagement.

Lire la suite
Vers l’orbanisation de l’Europe ?

Vers l’orbanisation de l’Europe ?

Par Sylvain Kahn - Viktor Orban et la Fidesz ont remporté les élections législatives en Hongrie dimanche 8 avril 2018. Avec plus de 48 % des suffrages et plus du tiers des sièges, ils progressent significativement par rapport aux deux précédents scrutins qui, déjà, les avaient mené au pouvoir en 2010 et en 2014. Cette troisième victoire de rang signale une évolution structurelle de la vie politique européenne. Cette évolution peut être baptisée « l’orbanisation » de l’Europe.

Lire la suite
Jacinda Ardern et Justin Trudeau à Sciences Po

Jacinda Ardern et Justin Trudeau à Sciences Po

Ils ont en commun de compter parmi les plus jeunes chefs de gouvernement au monde. À l'occasion de leurs visites officielles en France, Jacinda Ardern, Première ministre de Nouvelle-Zélande, et Justin Trudeau, Premier ministre du Canada, sont venus donner deux conférences exceptionnelles ce lundi 16 avril 2018 à Sciences Po.

Lire la suite

"Être libre de choisir sa propre vie"

Que signifie être libéral ? Dans son cours “Introduction à la pensée libérale”, le philosophe Gaspard Koenig explore les facettes d’une notion si familière qu’on en oublie l’histoire, la complexité et la profondeur. Car le libéralisme, c'est avant tout une “doctrine de l’individu”, dont les contours et le sens varient en fonction des cultures, des pays, et des courants de pensée. Un cours de philosophie, en sorte, bien plus que de politique.

Lire la suite
S’engager au service des autres

S’engager au service des autres

Nouveauté liée à la réforme du bachelor, le parcours civique propose aux étudiants d’appréhender la citoyenneté et la responsabilité sociale à travers le développement d’un projet personnel au service des autres. Se déroulant hors les murs de Sciences Po, le parcours civique amène les étudiants à rencontrer des personnes de différents milieux travaillant les secteurs de l'éducation, de l'emploi, de l'environnement, de la justice, de la santé, de la paix, etc.

Lire la suite
“C’est la grève générale en France qui a contribué à faire de 1968 une année clé dans le monde”

“C’est la grève générale en France qui a contribué à faire de 1968 une année clé dans le monde”

1968, année de révolutions ? Oui, mais pas seulement en France. Alors que beaucoup cantonnent cette année aux événements de mai et à ses barricades parisiennes, Gerd-Rainer Horn, enseignant-chercheur en histoire politique au Centre d’histoire de Sciences Po, rappelle que de nombreux mouvements étudiants se sont également déroulés partout dans le monde cette année-là. Entretien.

Lire la suite
“Aider les femmes à réaliser leurs ambitions”

“Aider les femmes à réaliser leurs ambitions”

Se lancer dans l’entrepreneuriat, négocier son salaire, accéder à des responsabilités… Comment aider les femmes à atteindre des postes de leadership ? Mieux comprendre les freins auxquels les femmes sont confrontées et mener des actions pour les lever, c’est l’objectif de la nouvelle “Chaire pour l’entrepreneuriat des femmes” lancée par Sciences Po. Interview avec Anne Boring, chercheuse spécialisée dans l’analyse des inégalités femmes-hommes dans le monde du travail et responsable de la Chaire.

Lire la suite
Candidats en 1ère année : 5 idées reçues sur les oraux

Candidats en 1ère année : 5 idées reçues sur les oraux

Vous avez passé l'écrit avec succès ? Bravo ! La deuxième quinzaine du mois de mai 2018, tous les candidats admissibles au Collège universitaire (1er cycle) de Sciences Po sont invités à un entretien. Une épreuve parfois stressante qui génère son lot d’idées reçues : voici quelques conseils pour se débarrasser des clichés et aborder ce dernier round avec le maximum de sérénité.

Lire la suite