A week in Silicon Valley

To get students thinking about the many aspects of the digital revolution, Sciences Po’s Entrepreneurship Centre took fifteen of them to Silicon Valley for a close-up look at technology’s key players, including Facebook, Google and AirBnb. Yaël, who is doing a research-based Master’s in political theory at the Sciences Po Doctoral School, and Thomas, an engineering student at Polytechnique, took part in this immersion-learning trip. Machine learning, blockchain, data science... they told us all about it.

What made you want to take part in this Silicon Valley experience?

Thomas: As an engineering student, Silicon Valley is pretty much legendary, so it’s not the sort of trip you refuse! But I also wanted to go because of some questions I have. This place is home to companies that are changing the world. Everybody from the United States to Africa has Facebook and WhatsApp, for instance. So we need ask ourselves what impacts these companies are having. What do they contribute in terms of democracy and equality?

Yaël: Sciences Po’s Entrepreneurship Centre invited us to go in “tandem”; each Sciences Po student had to pair up with a science or technology student. The questions engineers ask are different from the things Sciences Po students ask and that’s really interesting! When we met with Criteo [a company specialised in targeted advertising] for example, Thomas asked a lot of technical questions about machine learning.

As well as tech giants like Facebook and Google, you met with successful startups like Coursera and researchers from Berkeley and Stanford. What did you get out of meeting such diverse stakeholders?

Yaël: By meeting them in turn, you understand how much everything is interconnected. Silicon Valley is an extremely well established ecosystem, from researchers to investors to companies, which are just one part of the chain. You quickly understand that this fluidity is one of the key elements of Silicon Valley.

Thomas: You also understand that, in the end, the goal of any startup is to go public on the stock market or to find a buyer. And it’s interesting to see that companies such as Uber or Airbnb aren’t based on any real technical innovations. Their main innovation is an idea and how they implement it. In the case of Criteo, which we mentioned before, their targeted advertising is not innovative; it’s their business model that is highly sophisticated. Their edge is more economic than technical.

What surprised you?

Thomas: The entrepreneurial ideology is everywhere and there is no clear division between work and private life. The Facebook campus is a small town, like a little amusement park where food is free and people can spend the day. Each individual is a mini-start up. People go into a company, get fired, start their own business, mess up, start over...

Yaël: The Americans’ constant enthusiasm is a real culture shock. It’s a culture where people think positive about everything, including failure. Which is a good thing, sure, but sometimes you wonder if there’s any room for self-critique. At a meeting with one researcher, we asked him about some of his difficulties and his answer surprised all of us: “We’re not going to get into a criticism of my work!”

Which visits or meetings had the most impact on you?

Yaël: The meeting with Tenzin Seldon, a Tibetan who created a startup, Kinstep, that aims to “match” the skills of refugees with the needs of businesses. She explained to us that hers was a consciously pragmatic solution because that’s how everything works out there: everything is monetized, including philanthropy. Moreover, she was well aware of the limits of this system.

Thomas: I was very interested in our meeting with a “mathlete” [mathematics champion] at Google. He specialises in the development of new machine learning methods in the medical field. He is convinced that the next innovations will be in this area.

Did these encounters inspire you? Did they make you want to transpose certain aspects of Silicon Valley to France?

Thomas: We came back with quite mixed feelings about the Silicon Valley model; in fact our “learning expedition” sometimes turned into a “judging expedition”! The near complete absence of state intervention creates a certain number of “flaws”, particularly social ones: California is the state with the most homeless people, prisoners, poverty, etc. The Silicon Valley milieu is in fact a very ideological, very “solutionist” environment, including for social problems. To give you an example, the company Palantir has a philanthropic department. This department has set up an application to track homeless people and offer housing… to those who cost the most. And that’s not to mention ethical issues, which are set aside and at best considered after the fact, or the question of privacy that no one is asking. It’s all about trying to push the limits as far as possible and the idea of debate has no place there.

Yaël: The principle of a startup is to disrupt a market, which implies having found a flaw, as Airbnb did by proposing a competitive alternative to hotels. But it’s clear that when a market is disrupted, this raises social, legal, economic and other problems. The Silicon Valley model is not ideologically neutral. During our stay, I enjoyed the meeting with Fred Turner, a historian of American culture who has worked extensively on the history of Silicon Valley. He is very critical about inequalities in California. Which clearly poses the problem of whether this model is transposable to France. Our culture is not the same and the startups that are being created here are much more aware of their social and environmental impact. Our ecosystem is more “conscious”, which is a good thing.

The Learning Expedition (FR) is a recurring programme offered by Sciences Po. The next meetings are:

January 2019: A live session on social networks to meet the team that will be heading out to discover the entrepeneurial ecosystem of Boston - M.I.T - Harvard

March to April 2019: Broadcast of the team's productions (educational videos and articles) and thematic afterworks

April 2019: Application period for the next Learning Expedition 2019-2020 (destination still confidential!)

Find out more

Yaël Benayoun has just completed a research Master’s degree in political theory at Sciences Po. She is also president of the association Mouton numérique, which examines our relationship to digital technology.

Thomas Sentis is a student at École polytechnique specialising in artificial intelligence. He is also studying philosophy of science.

Start a business while studying with the Sciences Po incubator

70 chefs d’État au Paris Peace Forum

70 chefs d’État au Paris Peace Forum

Du 11 au 13 novembre 2018, se tient à Paris la première édition du Paris Peace Forum. Initié par le président Emmanuel Macron et co-organisé par 6 membres fondateurs dont Sciences Po, ce forum réunit de nombreux acteurs de la gouvernance mondiale. 70 chefs d’État ont répondu présents.

Lire la suite
États-Unis : des militants écologistes de plus en plus organisés

États-Unis : des militants écologistes de plus en plus organisés

Par Mario Del Pero (CHSP). Les questions environnementales n’ont certes pas été au centre de la campagne des midterms au États-Unis. Mais cette réalité ne signifie pas que le déni de Donald Trump concernant le dérèglement climatique et le démantèlement des règles établies par Barack Obama n’ont pas suscité dans le pays une riposte vigoureuse, et souvent efficace, voire une forme de résistance.

Lire la suite
On vous dit tout sur le Collège universitaire !

On vous dit tout sur le Collège universitaire !

Le Collège universitaire, qui donne le grade de bachelor, est la formation de premier cycle de Sciences Po. On répond à vos questions concernant les procédures d'admission, la préparation aux épreuves, les enseignements ou encore la vie quotidienne sur les sept campus de Sciences Po dans nos émissions live en français le 14 novembre à 19h30 et en anglais le 26 novembre à 14h.

Lire la suite
Nos campus en régions vous ouvrent leurs portes !

Nos campus en régions vous ouvrent leurs portes !

Vous êtes lycéen, vous voulez vous porter candidat à Sciences Po ? Enseignements, vie de campus : venez poser toutes vos questions lors des Journées Portes Ouvertes de nos campus en régions. Une occasion unique de rencontrer étudiants, professeurs et responsables pédagogiques du Collège universitaire (le 1er cycle de Sciences Po en trois ans).

Lire la suite
Engagée pour les océans

Engagée pour les océans

À l’occasion de la Semaine des Océans à Sciences Po, nous avons rencontré Ève Isambourg, étudiante en 3ème année du Collège universitaire et activiste pour la protection des océans. Après deux ans sur les bancs du campus de Paris, Ève a consacré sa troisième année à l’étranger à mobiliser les esprits sur les questions océaniques autour du monde. Dernière étape de sa mission et non des moindres : une conférence devant l’ONU à New York.

Lire la suite

"La guerre m'a fait oublier bien des choses..."

Au milieu de la Première guerre mondiale, alors que la France connaissait une hécatombe sans précédent, ont été créés des enseignements spéciaux pour les officiers blessés au front. Œuvre patriotique, ces enseignements eurent lieu à l’École libre des Sciences politiques - le premier nom de Sciences Po - alors dirigée par Eugène d’Eichthal, de 1916 à 1920. Une promesse d’avenir pour ces hommes qui sortaient de l’horreur.

Lire la suite
1918 et la guerre

1918 et la guerre "mondiale" : la naissance d'un récit géopolitique

Par Karoline Postel-Vinay (CERI). La guerre qui s’acheva à l’automne 1918 portait le nom de « grande guerre » en France et de « great war » en Angleterre. En Allemagne, elle n’était pas « grande » mais planétaire, et s’appelait « Weltkrieg » ou « guerre mondiale ». De même aux États-Unis où, depuis le printemps 1917, on la nommait « world war ». Ce décalage de terminologie recouvrait une différence de vision géopolitique. Le terme de « guerre mondiale » et ce à quoi il faisait, et fait encore, référence – c’est-à-dire un conflit proprement planétaire, englobant tous les pays – n’était pas encore universellement reconnu.

Lire la suite
Que sont devenus les soldats blessés de la Grande Guerre ?

Que sont devenus les soldats blessés de la Grande Guerre ?

En ce mois de novembre 2018 qui marque le centième anniversaire de l’armistice de 1918, nous rendons hommage au près d’1,5 million de soldats français tombés au front. Mais si les livres adaptés en films La chambre des officiers et Au revoir là-haut, ont fait prendre conscience de l’infinie souffrance des « gueules cassés », on sait mal ce que sont devenus les 1,3 million de soldats revenus invalides. C’est à ces hommes – et tout particulièrement à leur retour à la vie professionnelle – que Clément Collard, doctorant au Centre d’histoire consacre sa thèse : “La rééducation et la réintégration professionnelle des mutilés de la Grande Guerre de 1914 à 1940 “. Aperçu.

Lire la suite
Les 7 écoles de Sciences Po répondent à vos questions

Les 7 écoles de Sciences Po répondent à vos questions

Tout au long des mois de novembre et de décembre 2018, les sept écoles de Sciences Po présentent leur offre de masters lors d'émissions en direct sur le site web Campus-Channel. Pendant 40 minutes, les candidats peuvent poser toutes leurs questions aux doyens et aux étudiants de Sciences Po, afin de mieux connaître les programmes et les métiers auxquels préparent les écoles.

Lire la suite