A week in Silicon Valley

To get students thinking about the many aspects of the digital revolution, Sciences Po’s Entrepreneurship Centre took 15 of them to Silicon Valley for a close-up look at technology’s key players, including Facebook, Google and AirBnb. Yaël, who is doing a research-based Master’s in political theory at the Sciences Po Doctoral School, and Thomas, an engineering student at Polytechnique, took part in this immersion-learning trip. Machine learning, blockchain, data science... they told us all about it.

What made you want to take part in this Silicon Valley experience?

Thomas: As an engineering student, Silicon Valley is pretty much legendary, so it’s not the sort of trip you refuse! But I also wanted to go because of some questions I have. This place is home to companies that are changing the world. Everybody from the United States to Africa has Facebook and WhatsApp, for instance. So we need ask ourselves what impacts these companies are having. What do they contribute in terms of democracy and equality?

Yaël: Sciences Po’s Entrepreneurship Centre invited us to go in “tandem”; each Sciences Po student had to pair up with a science or technology student. The questions engineers ask are different from the things Sciences Po students ask and that’s really interesting! When we met with Criteo [a company specialised in targeted advertising] for example, Thomas asked a lot of technical questions about machine learning.

As well as tech giants like Facebook and Google, you met with successful startups like Coursera and researchers from Berkeley and Stanford. What did you get out of meeting such diverse stakeholders?

Yaël: By meeting them in turn, you understand how much everything is interconnected. Silicon Valley is an extremely well established ecosystem, from researchers to investors to companies, which are just one part of the chain. You quickly understand that this fluidity is one of the key elements of Silicon Valley.

Thomas: You also understand that, in the end, the goal of any startup is to go public on the stock market or to find a buyer. And it’s interesting to see that companies such as Uber or Airbnb aren’t based on any real technical innovations. Their main innovation is an idea and how they implement it. In the case of Criteo, which we mentioned before, their targeted advertising is not innovative; it’s their business model that is highly sophisticated. Their edge is more economic than technical.

What surprised you?

Thomas: The entrepreneurial ideology is everywhere and there is no clear division between work and private life. The Facebook campus is a small town, like a little amusement park where food is free and people can spend the day. Each individual is a mini-start up. People go into a company, get fired, start their own business, mess up, start over...

Yaël: The Americans’ constant enthusiasm is a real culture shock. It’s a culture where people think positive about everything, including failure. Which is a good thing, sure, but sometimes you wonder if there’s any room for self-critique. At a meeting with one researcher, we asked him about some of his difficulties and his answer surprised all of us: “We’re not going to get into a criticism of my work!”

Which visits or meetings had the most impact on you?

Yaël: The meeting with Tenzin Seldon, a Tibetan who created a startup, Kinstep, that aims to “match” the skills of refugees with the needs of businesses. She explained to us that hers was a consciously pragmatic solution because that’s how everything works out there: everything is monetized, including philanthropy. Moreover, she was well aware of the limits of this system.

Thomas: I was very interested in our meeting with a “mathlete” [mathematics champion] at Google. He specialises in the development of new machine learning methods in the medical field. He is convinced that the next innovations will be in this area.

Did these encounters inspire you? Did they make you want to transpose certain aspects of Silicon Valley to France?

Thomas: We came back with quite mixed feelings about the Silicon Valley model; in fact our “learning expedition” sometimes turned into a “judging expedition”! The near complete absence of state intervention creates a certain number of “flaws”, particularly social ones: California is the state with the most homeless people, prisoners, poverty, etc. The Silicon Valley milieu is in fact a very ideological, very “solutionist” environment, including for social problems. To give you an example, the company Palantir has a philanthropic department. This department has set up an application to track homeless people and offer housing… to those who cost the most. And that’s not to mention ethical issues, which are set aside and at best considered after the fact, or the question of privacy that no one is asking. It’s all about trying to push the limits as far as possible and the idea of debate has no place there.

Yaël: The principle of a startup is to disrupt a market, which implies having found a flaw, as Airbnb did by proposing a competitive alternative to hotels. But it’s clear that when a market is disrupted, this raises social, legal, economic and other problems. The Silicon Valley model is not ideologically neutral. During our stay, I enjoyed the meeting with Fred Turner, a historian of American culture who has worked extensively on the history of Silicon Valley. He is very critical about inequalities in California. Which clearly poses the problem of whether this model is transposable to France. Our culture is not the same and the startups that are being created here are much more aware of their social and environmental impact. Our ecosystem is more “conscious”, which is a good thing.

Find out more

Yaël Benayoun has just completed a research Master’s degree in political theory at Sciences Po. She is also president of the association Mouton numérique, which examines our relationship to digital technology.

Thomas Sentis is a student at École polytechnique specialising in artificial intelligence. He is also studying philosophy of science.

Start a business while studying with the Sciences Po incubator

Tout savoir sur l’apprentissage à Sciences Po

Tout savoir sur l’apprentissage à Sciences Po

Oui, on peut faire son master en apprentissage à Sciences Po ! Près du tiers des formations de 2ème cycle proposent cette possibilité. Une option plébiscitée par tous : les étudiants pour l’insertion professionnelle, les employeurs pour le recrutement, et l’université pour son intérêt pédagogique. Point d’étape avec Cornelia Woll, Directrice des études et de la scolarité. 

Lire la suite
Frédéric Mion reconduit à la tête de Sciences Po

Frédéric Mion reconduit à la tête de Sciences Po

Les instances de gouvernance de Sciences Po ont décidé de reconduire Frédéric Mion, directeur depuis 2013, pour un second mandat à la tête de l’institution. L’occasion de revenir sur son bilan, et d’esquisser son projet à l’horizon des 150 ans de Sciences Po : ouvrir, rassembler et innover.
Lire la suite

Luca Vergallo reçoit le prix Érignac pour ses simulations qui permettent de mieux comprendre les services de secours

Luca Vergallo reçoit le prix Érignac pour ses simulations qui permettent de mieux comprendre les services de secours

Le Prix Claude Érignac récompense chaque année une étudiante ou un étudiant de Sciences po pour son engagement au service de valeurs républicaines et humanistes. Cette année, c'est Luca Vergallo, étudiant en Master politiques publiques qui a été distingué pour son développement d’une pédagogie innovante qui valorise les services publics de secours et sensibilise à la gestion et à la communication de crise.

Lire la suite
“Si ce Mooc peut ouvrir l’esprit à ceux qui érigent des murs, nous aurons réussi notre pari”

“Si ce Mooc peut ouvrir l’esprit à ceux qui érigent des murs, nous aurons réussi notre pari”

Après le succès du Mooc Espace Mondial et ses 25 000 inscrits, Bertrand Badie présente son nouveau cours en ligne intitulé "Afrique et mondialisation, regards croisés", qui démarre sur la plateforme Coursera lundi 12 février 2018. Accessible à tous et réalisé par une équipe de neuf enseignants africains, latino-américains et européens, ce nouveau Mooc propose une vision inédite du continent et de son avenir. Et invite à repenser la gouvernance globale. Entretien. 

Lire la suite
Comment fonctionne le dopage ? Les enseignements de l’affaire russe

Comment fonctionne le dopage ? Les enseignements de l’affaire russe

Par Didier Demazière (CSO). Le spectre du dopage resurgit avec chaque grand événement sportif. Celui-ci mêle, de façon quelque peu schizophrène, célébration d’une éthique méritocratique fièrement affichée et rumeurs plus ou moins sourdes de tricheries et de manquements à cet idéal. Les Jeux olympiques d’hiver de Pyeongchang en Corée du Sud n’échappent pas à cette règle. En effet, leur préparation a été marquée par l’affaire de la disqualification des sportifs russes, certains étant finalement autorisés à concourir sous la bannière « Olympic Athlete from Russia », sans pouvoir arborer les couleurs de leur pays.

Lire la suite
Une semaine dans la Silicon Valley

Une semaine dans la Silicon Valley

Afin de sensibiliser les étudiants aux révolutions du digital, le Centre pour l’entrepreneuriat de Sciences Po a proposé à quinze d’entre eux de découvrir la Silicon Valley à la rencontre des acteurs du numérique : Facebook, Google, Airbnb... Yaël, en master recherche de théorie politique à l’École doctorale de Sciences Po, et Thomas, étudiant ingénieur à l'École polytechnique, faisaient partie de ce road trip original d’apprentissage par l’immersion. Machine learning, blockchain, data sciences… Ils nous expliquent tout.

Lire la suite
Quels sont les liens entre politique et croyance ?

Quels sont les liens entre politique et croyance ?

Dans l’essai collectif Croire et faire croire. Usages politiques de la croyance (éd. Presses de Sciences Po), Anne Muxel, chercheur au Centre de recherches politiques de Sciences Po (CEVIPOF), a réuni plusieurs contributions sur les ressorts de la croyance dans nos sociétés contemporaines. Des fake news à l’engagement djihadiste, un ouvrage qui met en évidence les liens intimes qu’entretiennent croyance et vérité. Interview.

Lire la suite
À quoi sert le contrôle des chômeurs ?

À quoi sert le contrôle des chômeurs ?

Par Didier Demazière (CSO). Le contrôle des chômeurs s’invite régulièrement dans le débat public. C’est le cas en France à l’occasion de la réflexion gouvernementale sur le renforcement du contrôle de la recherche d’emploi. Cette question polarise les opinions : pour les uns cette politique est souhaitable car elle favorise un retour plus rapide à l’emploi et permet une chasse aux fraudeurs ; pour les autres elle est erronée car l’action publique doit être focalisée sur le soutien aux chômeurs et éviter tout risque de stigmatisation de ces victimes de la pénurie d’emplois. Que sait-on des dispositifs de contrôle et de sanctions ? Quelle est leur efficacité sur l’accès à l’emploi ? Quelles sont leurs conséquences, voulues ou non ? Finalement, quelle est leur légitimité ?

Lire la suite
“Le futur se construit aujourd'hui”

“Le futur se construit aujourd'hui”

Elle vient de Madagascar et aimerait être de ceux qui compteront dans l’avenir de son pays. Fitiavana Andry fait partie de la première promotion des boursiers Sciences Po - MasterCard Foundation, un programme qui permet d’accompagner des étudiants du continent africain engagés.

Lire la suite