How Education Systems Undermine Gender Equity, and Why Culture Change - Not Policy - May be the Solution

Seminar November 20th 2018, 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
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LIEPP's Educational policies research group is glad to invite you to attent the seminar : 

How Education Systems Undermine Gender Equity, and Why Culture
Change - Not Policy - May be the Solution

[language: English]

Tuesday
 November 20th 2018, 4:00 - 6:00
LIEPP's séminar room
254 bd Saint Germain, 75007 Paris

Registration

 

Presentation:

cimpian

 

Joseph Robinson CIMPIAN

Associate Professor of Economics and Education Policy, NYU Steinhardt

 

 

Abstract

From the time students enter kindergarten, teachers overestimate the abilities of boys in math, relative to behaviorally and academically matched girls, contributing to a gender gap favoring boys in both math achievement and confidence. Using data from numerous nationally representative studies spanning kindergarten through university level, as well as experimental evidence, I demonstrate how girls and young women face discrimination and bias throughout their academic careers and suggest that a substantial portion of the growth in the male–female math achievement gap is socially constructed. Each of the studies leads to a broader set of considerations about why females are viewed as less intellectually capable than their male peers. The studies also demonstrate that biases can be exhibited and perpetuated by members of negatively stereotyped groups (e.g., female teachers demonstrate greater bias against girls than do male teachers), and raise questions about the root causes of their biases and the long-term effects of being negatively stereotyped oneself. This research also suggests that comparing boys and girls on metrics such as standardized tests and grades may contribute to a false belief that education systems promote the success of females. Together, the studies suggest several implications for research, teacher professional development, and policy.