Cambridge and Sciences Po strengthen ties

The two universities consolidate their partnership at a time when collaboration across the channel is more crucial than ever.

On 24 November, Frédéric Mion, President of Sciences Po, and Eilís Ferran, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Institutional and International Relations of the University of Cambridge, signed an agreement to strengthen the universities’ long-standing partnership. 

The cooperation framework aims to develop research links in disciplines such as politics, history and public policy, with a strong expectation that the collaboration will develop to include other areas of mutual interest. The signing ceremony held at Sciences Po in Paris on Friday marked the beginning of the initial three-year term of the agreement.

"Collaboration between academic institutions is more crucial than ever before"

Both parties have committed to providing matched funds to finance academic workshops and symposia, travel grants, short-term research visits and visiting professorships at both Sciences Po and Cambridge. Other bilateral activities specified in the agreement include encouraging student mobility and establishing teaching fellowships for Cambridge PhD students at Sciences Po campuses in Reims, Menton and Le Havre, where lectures are given in English.

“This Memorandum of Agreement builds on strong existing relationships between our two world-leading universities,” said Professor Ferran after the signing. “It offers us a formal mechanism to strengthen our partnership at a time when collaboration between academic institutions is more crucial than ever before.”

One of the first joint actions to arise from this new agreement between Cambridge and Sciences Po is a public conference on “The Future of Europe” to be held in Paris in 2018, led by European studies specialists from both institutions.

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