All you need to know about undergraduate applications

The Sciences Po Undergraduate College is now accepting applications from international students for the 2019 intake. To help you with your application, our admissions team has selected some of the most frequently asked questions from prospective international undergraduates.

What are the essential points to include in the personal statement for an undergraduate degree?

For the personal statement, our admissions team is ultimately interested in why you want to study at Sciences Po and what you think you could contribute to the university. The personal statement is an opportunity to present your skills, but the most important thing is to give us a feel for your personality. Sciences Po is looking for students who are motivated, intellectually curious, and committed to their studies.

Do I have to get the qualifications in my application translated?

Copies of your transcripts and qualifications must be uploaded to your personal admissions space in their original language. If necessary, you may be asked for an official French or English translation of these documents. The Menton and Le Havre campuses require a French or English translation of your documents if they are in any other language.

What is the best way to prepare for the admissions interview for international students?

The interview is the second step in the admissions procedure and is only offered to shortlisted students. For the interview, applicants are asked to read and analyse a text within a short period of time, then deliver a structured oral presentation of their commentary. The interviewers then ask the candidate a series of questions pertaining to their presentation and to their application as a whole.

More information on the admissions interview and advice on how to prepare

Which foreign languages (except for French and English) are available on each campus and how much time is spent in language classes?

The time spent in English or French classes differs according to the student’s level in the respective language. Classes are more intensive for those who are less advanced and meet several times a week. For the student’s second foreign language choice, sessions generally take place once a week. Beginners in languages which require the learning of a new alphabet may need to meet more often.

The availability of foreign languages, aside from English and French, depends on each campus’s regional specialisation. Below is a list of the languages taught at each of the seven undergraduate campuses.

Reims campus
  • Europe-North America programme: Spanish, Italian, German, Arabic
  • Europe-Africa programme: Arabic, Portuguese, Swahili
Menton campus
  • Middle East and Mediterranean programme: Arabic, Turkish, Italian, Persian, Hebrew
Le Havre campus
  • Europe-Asia programme: Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indonesian
Dijon campus
  • European - Central and Eastern Europe programme: Hungarian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Czech.
Nancy campus
  • European Franco-German programme: German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, Swedish.
Poitiers campus
  • Europe-Latin America programme: Spanish, Portuguese

More information about language courses at Sciences Po

More information about language admission requirements

How many hours can I expect to spend each week on university courses and study?

The amount of time spent in class each week depends on multiple factors, including your language levels in English and French and the number of courses that you choose to take. The same can be said for the number of hours spent on studying and coursework. Overall, students can expect to spend somewhere between 20-25 hours in class.

What are the tuition fees for undergraduate international students?

For students whose tax residence is within the European Economic Area, tuition fees are calculated according to a sliding scale based on household income, and will fall between €0 and €10,250. Those residing outside of the European Economic Area pay fees of €10,250.

More information on the tuition fee calculator

May I apply for both a dual Bachelor’s programme and an undergraduate programme at Sciences Po simultaneously?

Yes, but whether you will need to submit two separate applications or a single application for both programmes depends on the dual degree in question.

If you are applying to the dual Bachelor’s degree programme with Freie Universität Berlin or the University of Hong Kong, you only need to submit one application through Sciences Po’s system. You must select the dual degree as a first choice of programme and one of our undergraduate programmes as a second choice.

For the dual Bachelor’s programme with UC Berkeley, Columbia University, the National University of Singapore, University of Sydney, University of British Columbia, or University College London, you must submit two applications: one on the website of the partner university for the dual degree (joint admission process) and the other on the Sciences Po website (admission to Sciences Po), where you will be able to select one of our undergraduate programmes.

More information

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