ADMISSIONS REPORT 2017: SCIENCES PO’S ATTRACTIVENESS CONFIRMED

The 2017 admissions report confirms Sciences Po’s attractiveness, with nearly 17,000 candidates in total and international students in particular applying in increasing numbers. The success of our Master’s programmes is also underscored with a 6 percent rise in applications to our seven graduate schools.

Attractiveness, selectivity...

More than 9,600 candidates applied to the Undergraduate College, where Sciences Po’s Bachelor’s programme is offered—a 3.6 percent rise overall compared to 2016. 1,800 were admitted. Boosting overall demand was an 11 percent increase in candidates through the international procedure and to our nine international dual degrees.

Applications to the Master’s programmes delivered at our seven graduate schools increased by 6 percent, with nearly 6,700 candidates and about 2,000 students admitted. Graduate applications through the international procedure and to our 38 dual degrees increased by 9.6 percent.

... and diversity

60 percent of admitted French students come from outside the Paris region, a figure apt to counter a stubborn preconception about Sciences Po’s student body. Our 1,800 new undergraduates come from a thousand different high schools in France and around the world. This is the result of Sciences Po’s commitment to social diversity, which has seen nearly 1,800 students admitted through the Equal Opportunity programme since 2001. And more broadly, it highlights the impact of our unique financial aid and sliding scale tuition fee policy. In 2017, direct aid to students amounted to approximately €10.4 million and benefited 37 percent of students.

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 Read the Sciences Po's Admissions Report 2017

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Meet Sciences Po's 2018 undergraduates

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The Spy Who Studied at Sciences Po

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After graduating at the top of her class in July 1940, Jeannie de Clarens, née Rousseau, set out on an extraordinary career in the world of interpretation and espionage. At 23 years old, she was to hand Allied Forces one of the Second World War’s most precious pieces of intelligence. In memory of de Clarens, a true heroine of the French Resistance, Sciences Po now pays homage by giving her name to a lecture hall.

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Lecture halls renamed after two legends

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Sharyl Attkisson at the School of Journalism

Sharyl Attkisson at the School of Journalism

For the start of this academic year, the School of Journalism’s guest of honour was award-winning investigative journalist Sharyl Attkisson. Formerly an anchor for CNN and CBS News and now host of Full Measure, a US investigative news series, Attkisson has won multiple Emmy Awards and published two best-selling works of non-fiction, The Smear and Stonewalled. In her keynote speech to students, she discussed the state of journalism in a context of “fake news” and addressed the challenges facing anyone wishing to enter the “dynamic, troubled but important and exciting profession of journalism”.

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