A new dual Master’s degree with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto

The Sciences Po School of Public Affairs and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto are launching a dual degree programme between their respective Master in Public Policy (MPP) and Master of Global Affairs (MGA). 

Students will complete the dual degree programme in 24 months, spending the first year at Sciences Po in Paris and the second year at the Munk School of Global Affairs in Toronto. All students will complete an internship (12-16 weeks) during the summer of the first year.

Studying at leading institutions in both Paris and Toronto, students will benefit from varied perspectives on public policies and global affairs in two different contexts (European and North American), thus enhancing their own global experience. Students may choose to study in English or French at Sciences Po. At the Munk School of Global Affairs, courses will be taught in English.

The first cohort of students in the dual degree programme will start classes in Paris in September 2018 with an expected intake of 10 to 12 students.

More information on the dual degree with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto

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