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Fair Access to Higher Education: Global Perspectives. Edited by Anna Mountford-Zimdars, Daniel Sabbagh, and David Post

students

The University of Chicago Press, coming January 2015, 288 p. 

What does “fairness” mean internationally in terms of access to higher education? Increased competition for places in elite universities has prompted a worldwide discussion regarding the fairness of student admission policies. Despite budget cuts from governments—and increasing costs for students—competition is fierce at the most prestigious institutions. Universities, already under stress, face a challenge in balancing institutional research goals, meeting individual aspirations for upward social mobility, and promoting the democratic ideal of equal opportunity. Fair Access to Higher Education addresses this challenge from a broad, transnational perspective...

Fair Access to Higher Education addresses this challenge from a broad, transnational perspective. The chapters in this volume contribute to our thinking and reflection on policy developments and also offer new empirical findings about patterns of advantage and disadvantage in higher education access. Bringing together insights drawn from a variety of fields, including philosophy, linguistics, social psychology, sociology, and public policy, the book sheds light on how “fairness” in university admissions has been articulated worldwide.
 
Fair Access to Higher Education addresses this challenge from a broad, transnational perspective. The chapters in this volume contribute to our thinking and reflection on policy developments and also offer new empirical findings about patterns of advantage and disadvantage in higher education access. Bringing together insights drawn from a variety of fields, including philosophy, linguistics, social psychology, sociology, and public policy, the book sheds light on how “fairness” in university admissions has been articulated worldwide.
Fair Access to Higher Education addresses this challenge from a broad, transnational perspective. The chapters in this volume contribute to our thinking and reflection on policy developments and also offer new empirical findings about patterns of advantage and disadvantage in higher education access. Bringing together insights drawn from a variety of fields, including philosophy, linguistics, social psychology, sociology, and public policy, the book sheds light on how “fairness” in university admissions has been articulated worldwide.
 

 

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Elections in a Hybrid Regime. Revisiting the 2011 Ugandan Polls. Edited by Sandrine Perrot et al.

How different were the 2011 elections? Did the political environment in the run-up to the elections restrict the capacity of political organizations to "organize and express themselves"? Could the relative restriction of civil and political freedoms affect the pattern of voting and electoral outcomes? Do the election outcomes represent the people's view? To answer these questions, this new book edited by Sandrine Perrot, Sabiti Makara, Jérôme Lafargue and Marie-Aude Fouéré applies a multidisciplinary approach to conducting a multifaceted analysis of the 2011 elections in Uganda. 

Fountain Publishers, 2014. 

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Cycles de séminaires en coopération entre Sciences Po – CERI et EDF R&D

Géopolitique de l’énergie


Séminaire 5 : Energie et géopolitique : quelle place pour les énergies fossiles ?


Présidence : François Bafoil, CNRS-SciencesPo/CERI ; Ferenc Fodor, EDF R&D


Energie et géopolitique : en évolution constante

 

Intervenant : Samuel Furfari, Commission Européenne, DG Energie et transport, Professeur à l’Université Libre de Bruxelles


Responsables scientifiques : François Bafoil, CNRS-Sciences Po-CERI, Ferenc Fodor, EDF R&D

 

Lieu : CERI, Salle Jean Monnet (rez-de-chaussée), 56 rue Jacob, 75006 Paris

 

Contact : rachel.guyet@sciencespo.fr



edf
Energie et géopolitique : quelle place pour les énergies fossiles ? 13/03 For more information

Séminaire organisé dans le cadre du groupe de recherche "Environnement et relations internationales" du CERI

 

Intervenant : Brice Lalonde, UN Global Compact

 

Discutante : Krytel Wanneau, doctorante (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

 

 

Responsables scientifiques :

François Gemenne (CEDEM-ULg / CEARC-UVSQ, expert associé au CERI)

Lucile Maertens (doctorante en science politique, Sciences Po-CERI, UNIGE-GSI)

Alice Baillat (doctorante en science politique, Sciences Po-CERI)

 

 

CERI-Sciences Po

56 rue Jacob 75006 Paris

Salle de conférences

 

 

Avec son projet « Paris Climat 2015 : Make it Work », une initiative lancée en avril dernier qui vise à encourager la réussite du sommet de Paris sur le climat, Sciences Po s’est engagé dans la lutte contre le réchauffement climatique.

En savoir plus sur Paris Climat 2015 : Make it Work : blogs.sciences-po.fr/cop21makeitwork

 

-Photo: Paulo Filguerias-


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La coopération internationale en matière de changement climatique 25/02 For more information

Séminaire du groupe de recherche Organisations Internationales du CERI.

 

En partenariat avec l’Ecole doctorale de Sciences Po et le Groupe de Recherche sur l’Action Multilatérale de l'AFSP (GRAM).

 

Avec :

 

Léonard Laborie, CNRS/IRICE

 

Discutant : Jean-Marie Chenou, Université de Lausanne, Suisse 

 

 

Responsables scientifiques : Guillaume Devin (Sciences Po-CERI), Marieke Louis (Sciences Po-CERI), Noël Bonhomme (Université Paris 4/IRICE) et Chloé Maurel (ENS/IHMC).

 

CERI-56 rue Jacob, 75006 Paris / Salle Jean Monnet

Entrée libre dans la limite des places disponibles.


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Les organisations internationales à l'heure d'Internet 12/02 For more information